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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1938

THIS is the month when librarians and library workers everywhere, their holidays over, turn to their winter plans. There are, however, some interesting events to take…

Abstract

THIS is the month when librarians and library workers everywhere, their holidays over, turn to their winter plans. There are, however, some interesting events to take place before the darker and more active months come. The first is the meeting at Oxford on September 21st and subsequent days of the Federation International de Documentation. This will be followed by and merge into the ASLIB Conference, and there is in prospect an attendance of over three hundred. Our readers know that this organization produces and advocates the International Decimal Classification. It is not primarily a “library” society but rather one of abstractors and indexers of material, but it is closely akin, and we hope that English librarianship will be well represented. Then there is a quite important joint‐conference at Lincoln of the Northern Branches of the Library Association on September 30th— October 3rd, which we see is to be opened by the President of the Library Association. Finally the London and Home Counties Branch are to confer at Folkestone from October 14th to 16th, and here, the programme includes Messrs. Jast, Savage, McColvin, Wilks, Carter, and the President will also attend. There are other meetings, and if the question is asked: do not librarians have too many meetings ? we suppose the answer to be that the Association is now so large that local conferences become desirable. One suggestion, that has frequently been made, we repeat. The Library Association should delegate a certain definite problem to each of its branches, asking for a report. These reports should form the basis of the Annual Conference. It is worthy of more consideration.

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New Library World, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

John Fulton and Joanne Pransky

For the time in its 45‐year history, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) reached beyond its standard defense contractors and out to the public, and in…

Abstract

For the time in its 45‐year history, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) reached beyond its standard defense contractors and out to the public, and in 2004 held the DARPA Grand Challenge in an effort to attract innovation in order to achieve a military mandate of having one‐third of America's ground combat vehicles unmanned by the year 2015. DARPA offered a cash prize of US$1 million to an automonous robotic vehicle that could navigate a 142 mile course in the Mojave desert in less than 10 h. Over 100 applications were submitted, and after further evaluations, DARPA narrowed the field to 25 finalists. After qualifying trials, 15 vehicles confronted the starting line on 13 March 2004. Though the farthest a vehicle got was 7.4 miles, the event was viewed as a technological breakthrough. This paper describes the systems that were set‐up to monitor and control the event, and features of the various robots.

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Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1960

ROYAL Alderman T. A. Abbott of Manchester, dealt with somewhat severely by Dr. Savage in his A Librarian's Memories, had at least enthusiasm for libraries. He was mightily…

Abstract

ROYAL Alderman T. A. Abbott of Manchester, dealt with somewhat severely by Dr. Savage in his A Librarian's Memories, had at least enthusiasm for libraries. He was mightily honoured when he became President at our Manchester Conference in 1921. “We are the Royal Library Association”, he declared and should call ourselves that; haven't we a Royal Charter? Our recognition comes direct from the Sovereign”. No doubt a vain wish, although the Library Association seemed to come near it in 1950 when George VI graciously became its Patron and the Duke of Edinburgh its President. Since that date the engineers have become “royal”, but we have slipped back. When Her Majesty came to the Throne, the patronage her father had bestowed was refused, no doubt on the direct counsel of her advisers who would not want so young a Sovereign to assume too many offices. On that view librarians could not murmur. There is a future, however, and in it there will be a new Library Association House next to, almost conjoined with, a new National Central Library. King George V with Queen Mary opened the second, as is well remembered especially by the King's speech, one of the best, most useful, in library history, in which he described the N.C.L. as “a university that all might join and none need ever leave”—words that we hope may somewhere be displayed in, or on, the new N.C.L. building. Royalty and its interest in libraries has been again manifested in the opening last month (July 13th to be precise) by Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, of the new Central Public Library at Kensington. The Royal Family has close relations with Kensington of course. It is recalled, too, that the Manchester Central and that at Birkenhead were opened also by King George V and Queen Mary; and Queen Elizabeth II quite recently opened the Central Library of the re‐created city of Plymouth, the largest new town library since the Second World War. Kensington has now opened the first major London library since 1939. It is not modern in spirit externally and, as is known, is the work of the architect of the Manchester Reference Library, Mr. Vincent Harris, and there is no doubt about its dignity. Its interior methods are, however, quite modern; a few of them were broadcast to us for a few moments by the B.B.C. announcer, to the effect that there were 100,000 books, that returned books in the lending library were not discharged at the counter but slid down a chute to a room below where that was done, etc., with the remark that books not available in the public apartment could be requisitioned from other libraries but, with the large stocks on show and in the building, that did not seem to be very necessary. We sometimes wish that broadcasters, however well intentioned that may have been, knew something about libraries. Happening at about the same time was the removal of the Holborn Central Library stock to its new home in Theobald's Road, a complex process which Mr. Swift and his staff carried out in July without interrupting the public service. We hope that Mr. Swift will be able soon to tell us how he carried out this scheme. Thus has begun what we hope will be a process of replacing many other London libraries with modern buildings more worthy of the excellent work now being done in them.

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New Library World, vol. 62 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Publication date: 14 July 2006

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The Hidden History of 9-11-2001
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-408-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Hindy Lauer Schacter

Analyses the Bureau of Municipal Research′s (BMR) role in the 1912New York City School Inquiry to show the democratic orientation of keypeople trying to transfer…

Abstract

Analyses the Bureau of Municipal Research′s (BMR) role in the 1912 New York City School Inquiry to show the democratic orientation of key people trying to transfer scientific management to government. Because much modern public administration literature portrays scientific management as authoritarian, some people assume its proponents wanted to shut the populace out of public‐sector decision making by transfering power from elected officials to experts. The School Inquiry case shows how important reformers committed to scientific management sought to maximize the control that elected officials had over a key administrative function. The BMR stressed this democratic point of view until threats from its principal financial backer forced it to downplay its voice on educational issues and its innovative concept of efficient citizenship.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sarah Tudor and Ruth Helyer

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Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

Nuffield Science — the transition from school to university. The London group of the Society for Research into Higher Education organized recently a seminar with the aim…

Abstract

Nuffield Science — the transition from school to university. The London group of the Society for Research into Higher Education organized recently a seminar with the aim of relating Nuffield thinking on Physical Science to problems of transition from school to university. Dr J. E. Spice, Organizer of the Physical Science Group of the Nuffield Science Teaching Project, opened and guided discussion. The 25 or so university teachers present were mostly teachers of the physical sciences.

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Education + Training, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1952

LIBRARIES of late have not had the radio publicity that was agreeably frequent at an earlier time. Occasionally there are broadcasts that are useful and, we believe…

Abstract

LIBRARIES of late have not had the radio publicity that was agreeably frequent at an earlier time. Occasionally there are broadcasts that are useful and, we believe, effective. A good example was that given by Mr. Charles Nowell on the centenary celebrations on September 2 of the Manchester Public Libraries. He told in a familiar conversational manner of the achievements of the past and the work now being done, with what seemed to this listener to be excellent effect, his voice being, like his manner, admirable for the microphone. Another useful, well balanced broadcast was that given on October 8th on the Home Service programme by Mr. Daniel George on the National Central Library in which an outline of the part played in the library life of the country was put over with simplicity and, again, confidential familiarity. We hope the L.A. and others who can influence the matter will keep the advantages of radio still well in mind. There is also T.V. and what that may do for libraries, or reading in connection with the use of libraries.

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New Library World, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Dr Ruth Helyer

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Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1966

The ILEA's Education Committee was recommended at its meeting on 15th December to approve the establishment of a closed‐circuit educational television service for London…

Abstract

The ILEA's Education Committee was recommended at its meeting on 15th December to approve the establishment of a closed‐circuit educational television service for London. The aim will be to open the service in the north‐east of London (covering Islington, Hackney and Tower Hamlets) in September 1968 and to have the service in operation throughout London by 1969–70.

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Education + Training, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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