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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

John F. Towell and Elizabeth R. Towell

Describes a networked virtual environment, a type of virtualreality most commonly known as a “MUD” or a“MOO”, which was used at an internationally‐attendedscientific…

573

Abstract

Describes a networked virtual environment, a type of virtual reality most commonly known as a “MUD” or a “MOO”, which was used at an internationally‐attended scientific conference held on the Internet. Interviews with conference attendees indicated enthusiasm for the effectiveness of the medium, and revealed how the virtual environment can be modified to improve conferencing efficacy. Such alterations included: novel input‐output control management; automation of conference registration; control of anonymous or guest connections; simplification of conference center topography; an improved methodology for recording discussion sessions; use of moderated rooms to compensate for network lag; and providing buffers to update late arriving participants. Concludes that networked virtual environments provide an inexpensive means for effective international conferencing on the Internet.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1967

Before this great innovation assaults the long‐suffering British public in mind and matter, in the retailer's cash register and the spender's pocket, a brief comparison…

Abstract

Before this great innovation assaults the long‐suffering British public in mind and matter, in the retailer's cash register and the spender's pocket, a brief comparison between the present coinage and the promised decimal one might not be amiss. The £sd system has its faults and understandably is difficult for the foreigner, but no more so than the language and the weather. Like many things British it is so haphazard: why should there be 240 pennies to the pound? Why 12 pennies to the shilling? One thing, however, about this awkward currency is that it is amazingly well‐adapted to price variations at the lower level, and most commodities are in this range. Whether prices have adapted themselves to the flexibility of the coinage or the other way round is immaterial but the centuries have well and truly married the two. As a lowly coin such as the farthing has ceased to have commercial use with the falling value of money, it has disappeared and its place has been taken by the next larger, the halfpenny and then by the penny, and this must surely be the one great advantage of the £sd system.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 69 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

The prayer against the Poultry (Hygiene) Regulations which we briefly mentioned in the editorial of our last issue, was lodged as a result of activity by the Environmental…

Abstract

The prayer against the Poultry (Hygiene) Regulations which we briefly mentioned in the editorial of our last issue, was lodged as a result of activity by the Environmental Health Officers' Association. Incidentally it is the first occasion as far as we can recall that a prayer has been lodged against any of the rash of food regulations of recent years, and reflects the strong feelings of the public health inspectorate.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1964

The Fatstock and Meat Marketing Committee was set up in April, 1962, “To investigate the organisation of the marketing and distribution of fatstock and carcase meat in the…

Abstract

The Fatstock and Meat Marketing Committee was set up in April, 1962, “To investigate the organisation of the marketing and distribution of fatstock and carcase meat in the United Kingdom, and the existing facilities and present methods employed; to consider whether changes are desirable; and to make recommendations.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 66 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1969

The statement of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, coming so quickly after the ban on the use of cyclamates in food and drink in the United States…

Abstract

The statement of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, coming so quickly after the ban on the use of cyclamates in food and drink in the United States, indicates that the new evidence of carcinogenesis in animals, placed at the disposal of the authorities by the U.S. F.D.A., has been accepted; at least, until the results of investigations being carried out in this country are available. The evidence was as new to the U.S. authorities as to our own and in the light of it, they could no longer regard the substances as in the GRAS class of food additives. It is, of course, right that any substance of which there is the slightest doubt should be removed from use; not as the result of food neuroses and health scares, but only on the basis of scientific evidence, however remote the connection. It is also right that there should always be power of selection by consumers avoidance is usually possible with other things known to be harmful, such as smoking and alcohol; in other cases, especially with chemical additives to food and drink, there must be pre‐knowledge, so that those who do not wish to consume food or drink containing such additives can ascertain from labelling those commodities which contain them.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 71 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Mary Walker, Lynn Langmeyer and Daniel Langmeyer

Examines the use of celebrity endorsement in advertising. Reviewsthe results of a recent study looking at the effect of a celebrity′sattractiveness, trustworthiness and…

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Abstract

Examines the use of celebrity endorsement in advertising. Reviews the results of a recent study looking at the effect of a celebrity′s attractiveness, trustworthiness and expertise on product purchase intentions, and of one examining the relevance of physical attractiveness and other symbolic attributes of the endorser in relation to product meaning. Considers implications for marketing managers and concludes that further research is necessary.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1965

Form and procedure for proof of analysis in prosecutions under food and drugs law has become so well established over the years that it is rare for it to be questioned…

Abstract

Form and procedure for proof of analysis in prosecutions under food and drugs law has become so well established over the years that it is rare for it to be questioned. This was done, however, in a Scottish case, reported in this journal (B.F.J., Sept. 1965, 800, 124), in which, the Sheriff dismissed the case because inter alia, the certificate of analysis was not in the form required by the Act, i.e., the Food and Drugs (Scotland) Act, 1936. It appeared from the report of the case that the public analyst had not signed the certificate as such. The Sheriff is reported as saying “All one can say about this certificate is that it is a certificate signed by one named T. M. Clark, who is an analyst”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 67 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Mary Walker, Lynn Langmeyer and Daniel Langmeyer

Considers the results of recent studies of celebrity endorsers inadvertisements. Analyses the results of a particular study evaluatingthree product categories: bath towels

1392

Abstract

Considers the results of recent studies of celebrity endorsers in advertisements. Analyses the results of a particular study evaluating three product categories: bath towels, blue jeans, and VCRs; two endorsers: Madonna and Christie Brinkley; and the product when advertised by each celebrity. Concludes that the endorser tends to pass their own image onto the product, particularly if the product has an undefined image, so it is important that the endorser′s image is consistent with the desired product image.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1970

Long before calories and joules were used to indicate energy values in relation to food, popular belief had it that some foods could increase man's output of labour, his…

Abstract

Long before calories and joules were used to indicate energy values in relation to food, popular belief had it that some foods could increase man's output of labour, his physical strength and endurance, even his fertility. The nature of the foods varied over the years. From earliest times, flesh foods have inspired men to “gird their loins” and “put on armour”, but too long at the feasting tables produced sloth of body and spirit. Hunger sharpens the wit, which makes one wonder if that oft‐quoted statement of poverty and hunger before the Great War—“children too hungry learn”—was quite true; it is now so long ago for most of us to remember. Thetruism “An army marches on its stomach” related to food in general and relating feats of strength to individual foods is something more difficult to prove. The brawny Scot owes little to his porridge; the toiling Irish labourer moves mountains of earth, not from the beef steaks he claims to consume, but for the size of the pay‐packet at the end of the week!

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 72 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1971

The review of food consumption elsewhere in this issue shows the broad pattern of food supplies in this country; what and how much we eat. Dietary habits are different to…

Abstract

The review of food consumption elsewhere in this issue shows the broad pattern of food supplies in this country; what and how much we eat. Dietary habits are different to what they were before the last War, but there have been few real changes since the end of that War. Because of supplies and prices, shifts within commodity groups have occurred, e.g. carcase meat, bread, milk, but overall, the range of foods commonly eaten has remained stable. The rise of “convenience foods” in the twenty‐five year since the War is seen as a change in household needs and the increasing employment of women in industry and commerce, rather than a change in foods eaten or in consumer preference. Supplies available for consumption have remained fairly steady throughout the period, but if the main food sources, energy and nutrient content of the diet have not changed, changes in detail have begun to appear and the broad pattern of food is not quite so markedly stable as of yore.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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