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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Paul R. Baines and John Egan

Questions the nature of marketing methods in political campaigns based on a grounded theoretical approach conducted using in‐depth interviews. Suggests that if marketing…

Abstract

Questions the nature of marketing methods in political campaigns based on a grounded theoretical approach conducted using in‐depth interviews. Suggests that if marketing success is measured solely by the level of turnout then the use of marketing in political campaigns would appear to be failing. Other reasons, however, may also explain this lack of success. The use of marketing may be less effective because the “market” is more restrictive, or marketing methods whilst actually being appropriate may be being used inappropriately. Concludes that, although the political “market” is different and restrictive, this does not negate the role of marketing in political campaigning.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Anna Watson, David A. Kirby and John Egan

Franchising has shown considerable growth in recent years and in advanced economies, such as the USA and the UK, and currently accounts for approximately one‐third of all…

Abstract

Franchising has shown considerable growth in recent years and in advanced economies, such as the USA and the UK, and currently accounts for approximately one‐third of all retail sales. It would seem, therefore, that franchising and retailing represent a fruitful partnership, though there has been little research as to why this should be. In this article the authors seek to address this situation by considering those characteristics that make retailing particularly suitable for franchising, through an examination of the UK context. Given the changing nature of the retail industry and the advent, in particular, of e‐commerce, consideration is given to the future for retail development through franchising.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

John Egan

Retailing, at first sight, appears to be an industry suitable for the exploitation of relational strategies. Despite this authors disagree about whether Relationship…

Abstract

Retailing, at first sight, appears to be an industry suitable for the exploitation of relational strategies. Despite this authors disagree about whether Relationship Marketing strategies are appropriate across the wide spectrum of retailing activities or whether the benefits are limited to certain retail types. This paper seeks to clarify whether a claim for universality can be made or, if not, clarify those “conditions” which most strongly support, or otherwise, the introduction of relational strategies.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Abstract

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

ROY M. WOODHEAD and STEVEN P. MALE

This paper explains how the capital proposals of large experienced clients of the UK construction industry are influenced by paradigms and perspectives. It shows how those…

Abstract

This paper explains how the capital proposals of large experienced clients of the UK construction industry are influenced by paradigms and perspectives. It shows how those involved in the decision‐to‐build process react to stimuli caused by a need to demonstrate objective decision‐making. The paper is taken from a 5‐year PhD study undertaken by the first author, which investigated the origins of the decision to build undertaken by leading clients. The clients sampled had a total annual construction budget of between £700 million and £1000 million in the year that data were collected. The product of the research was an explanation of what happens in the pre‐project stage, why it happens, and why it will change in the future. The significance of its conclusions is that any system designed to model or improve decision‐making in the pre‐project stage must be capable of adaptation and modification as influences and considerations shift. Moreover, the need to justify decisions as ‘objective’ empowers paradigms and perspectives that act as conditioning influences on the people making or shaping proposals. The paper concludes by showing that an understanding of the role played by paradigms and perspectives could allow management to ‘rethink construction’ and meet the challenges put forward by Sir John Egan (The Egan Report: Rethinking Construction, DETR, 1998).

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Ian Dow, Begum Sertyesilisik and Andrew David Ross

The purpose of this paper is to identify how much particular variables influence the cost differences between order values and final accounts for certain trade subcontractors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how much particular variables influence the cost differences between order values and final accounts for certain trade subcontractors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology consists of a literature survey and a case study. A sample of 33 projects, undertaken by a contracting organisation, are analysed as a basis for testing their significance.

Findings

For highly asset specific transactions the research suggests that the level of variables which can affect their performance is greatest, suggesting integration within the contracting firm to mitigate the threat of opportunistic behaviour. Procurement route utilised on a project was strongly linked to outturn cost performance, as is inclusion in the tender bid, suggesting earlier subcontractor involvement through design and build and partnering arrangements is significantly better at managing subcontractor cost performance than traditional routes.

Originality/value

The market volatility of the construction industry has meant the procurement of subcontractors has long been established as an important part of the project coalition. Transaction cost economic theory has recently become popular within the construction research industry. Much of this research has examined the vertical boundaries to which a construction firm is subjected when considering integration of trades or continued use of subcontractors. Empirical data on the cost performance of subcontractors within a project environment are not widely available. For this reason, this research aids practitioners and researchers by identifying why particular variables influence the cost differences between order values and final accounts for certain trade subcontractors.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Deborah Hughes, Trefor Williams and Zhaomin Ren

This research aimed to test the hypothesis “The use of incentivisation with a gain/pain share of about 15 per cent is a precursor to the achievement of successful…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aimed to test the hypothesis “The use of incentivisation with a gain/pain share of about 15 per cent is a precursor to the achievement of successful infrastructure partnering projects in South Wales”. This hypothesis arose from Egan's speech in 2008 discussing the success of partnering.

Design/methodology/approach

Two infrastructure projects in South Wales were chosen for the study. This research demonstrates that partnering is not suitable for all projects. Incentivisation places a focus on cost that can have a detrimental effect on the other aspects that exist within the oft quoted triangle of time, cost and quality.

Findings

Neither of the two case projects can be judged a success from the perspective of both parties. What represents success to one client would not equal success to the other. Overall it must be concluded that the hypothesis was not proven. Egan's view appears to be too simplistic to apply in all situations and is not always the key to success as he suggests.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution by exploring if incentivisation can provide success within infrastructure projects in South Wales. The content of the paper will be of interest to clients, contractors and consultants engaged in formulating partnering contracts.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Content available

Abstract

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Work Study, vol. 51 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

“We need a nation of well‐trained fully informed and motivated people — in other words educated”, said John Egan, Chairman and Chief Executive of Jaguar. He was speaking…

Abstract

“We need a nation of well‐trained fully informed and motivated people — in other words educated”, said John Egan, Chairman and Chief Executive of Jaguar. He was speaking to more than 200 senior and chief executives at the Engineering Industry Training Board's (EITB) conference, The Winning Margin, in late March. They had come to hear three speakers from West Germany, Japan and the USA describe their methods of developing human resources to achieve competitive success, and also to learn about British success stories. The theme of the conference was that, although the UK is lagging behind other countries, it can catch up, provided we invest in education, training and developing people.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

The concept of company culture is now playingan ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavourto work towards ever better companymanagement, particularly in the…

Abstract

The concept of company culture is now playing an ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better company management, particularly in the industrial field. This monograph reviews the history and development of both national and company cultures, and then goes on to demonstrate the significance of a culture to proper company management. Well‐managed companies will have both a “quality culture” and a “safety culture” as well as a cultural history. However, it has to be recognised that the company culture is subject to change, and effecting this can be very difficult. Of the many national cultures, that of Japan is considered to be the most effective, as is demonstrated by the present dominance of Japan on the industrial scene. Many industrialised nations now seek to emulate the Japanese style of management, but it is not possible to copy or acquire Japan′s cultural heritage. The text is illustrated by a large number of practical examples from real life, illustrating the way in which the company culture works and can be used by management to improve company performance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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