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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Jeffrey DeMarco, Yael llan-Clarke, Amanda Bunn, Tom Isaac, John Criddle, Gillian Holdsworth and Antonia Bifulco

Current government policy aims to tackle youth anti-social behaviour and its psychological and social impacts. Given an increased likelihood that young victims of crime…

Abstract

Purpose

Current government policy aims to tackle youth anti-social behaviour and its psychological and social impacts. Given an increased likelihood that young victims of crime are also likely to engage in aggressive or deviant behaviour and to have psychological and social difficulties, interventions are needed which access vulnerable youth with adverse lifestyles to increase well-being and reduce offending. The current project utilised a hospital emergency department (ED) as an appropriate location to identify and interact with youth victims of violent crime; to support key lifestyle risk and mental health difficulties; and build resilience. The purpose of this paper is to use a youth work paradigm, to target vulnerable youth in a health setting at a crisis point where intervention may have a higher chance of uptake.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied a quasi-experimental, longitudinal design. Using the strengths and difficulties questionnaire and the “What Do You Think” component of the ASSET risk assessment, data were collected from 120 youth aged 12-20, at baseline with 66 youth who successfully completed the programme with assessments at baseline and follow-up, at an average of 14 weeks.

Findings

There was significant reduction in both psychological problems and lifestyle risk at follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

These findings support the government initiative to intervene in youth violence in healthcare settings. Challenges revolve around increasing participation and greater formalisation of the intervention.

Originality/value

The youth work led violence intervention in the ED is successfully tackling psychological problems and lifestyle risk following injury.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Yael llan‐Clarke, Amanda Bunn, Jeffrey DeMarco, Antonia Bifulco, John Criddle and Gillian Holdsworth

Youth violence victimisation impacts on health, mental health and future risk trajectories. A London hospital emergency department (ED) outreach youth service provides a…

Abstract

Purpose

Youth violence victimisation impacts on health, mental health and future risk trajectories. A London hospital emergency department (ED) outreach youth service provides a unique intervention opportunity to support adolescents involved in violence. The purpose of this paper is to describe the set‐up of the service.

Design/methodology/approach

Young people (YP) targeted were aged 12‐18, from two London boroughs and attended ED with injuries from a violent incident. They were referred to Oasis youth workers for a mentoring/youth work intervention. Lifestyle and symptom scales were used to assess risk profile. Hospital staff questionnaires determined service awareness in the first six months, and interviews/focus group identified potential barriers to service uptake.

Findings

By 12 months, the service was operating smoothly. Of the first 505 YP attending ED, a third were referred, a third ineligible and a third non‐contactable/refused. Detailed analysis of the first 30 attending found most were male (87 per cent), equal White or Black ethnicity (40 per cent) with 20 per cent “Other” ethnicities, with only a third living with both biological parents. This was similar to the full population attending. Nearly half (49 per cent) had been assaulted, 30 per cent had injuries self‐generated through poor anger management, the remainder injured in fighting. Over half (57 per cent) had disorder, mostly behavioural, correlated with lifestyle risk scores. Barriers to service use/implementation included YP mistrust and fear of reprisals, problems with service visibility in the busy hospital environment and ineffective staff communication with YP, all countered during the running of the service. Gauging outcome at follow‐up is the second evaluation stage.

Originality/value

The youth violence project is an important initiative for intervention in youth violence.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1914

In the multiplicity of facts and factors which bear upon the feeding of nations the question of transport is the predominant partner.

Abstract

In the multiplicity of facts and factors which bear upon the feeding of nations the question of transport is the predominant partner.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 16 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Trung Nguyen, Ray Gosine and Peter Warrian

While disruptions as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the failure of some companies, others embraced innovative digital technologies to face the challenge…

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Abstract

Purpose

While disruptions as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the failure of some companies, others embraced innovative digital technologies to face the challenge posed by COVID-19. The COVID-19 crisis is also an opportunity for the extractive industry (EI) sectors to review their digitalization processes. The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of infectious disease mitigation in EI and to evaluate the resilience of these industries as they address pandemic prevention and control.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-case studies including digital and organizational responses to COVID-19 were analyzed to evaluate the readiness of health risk management (HRM) and resilience of EIs against the pandemic. The evaluation uses Google Scholar and Trends searches to compare the level of relevant activity in EIs with other industries.

Findings

Although EI sectors have various plans for minimizing pandemic impacts, unexpected disruptions and delays of the COVID-19 responses revealed many limitations of the existing HRM system. Digital technologies (e.g. artificial intelligence-based public health monitoring, digital collaboration, wearable health tracking and 3D printing) demonstrated their remarkable benefits in the pandemic responses and nontechnical elements affecting technology adoption (TA).

Originality/value

Lessons learned from the deployment of digital technologies against the pandemic help to improve the organizational capacity to deal effectively with future outbreaks and suggest lessons for the future trajectory of TA in these industries.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Lyndall Osborne

As non‐traditiona! entry to higher education increases, combined with high quality distance education and parttime learning opportunities which create an emphasis on the…

Abstract

As non‐traditiona! entry to higher education increases, combined with high quality distance education and parttime learning opportunities which create an emphasis on the concept of “lifelong learning”, the demand for learning resources and library services in all communities will increase. Provided that public libraries can rise to the inherent challenges in meeting the needs of lifelong learners, they will become the institution of choice for the general public for support of learning and education, offering prospective learners potential access to a wide range of high quality learning resources, no matter where they, or the resources, may be geographically situated. In this, by taking advantage of the advances of technology, the mobile library may expand its traditional role and be a major player in repositioning the library as an information broker in support of lifelong learning in remote or marginalised communities.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Rosa Lombardi, Maurizio Massaro, John Dumay and Fabio Nappo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why entrepreneurial universities choose a particular business strategy focussing on diversification and multi-nationalisation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate why entrepreneurial universities choose a particular business strategy focussing on diversification and multi-nationalisation, and the role of intellectual capital (IC) in supporting such strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is answered through an exploratory case study of the University of Bari, Italy. Data were collected from strategic plans, annual reports, national evaluation reports and semi-structured interviews with the university’s board members and analysed using Secundo et al.’s (2016) collective intelligence framework.

Findings

The authors show how contingency factors, such as economic and historical reasons, justify both the diversification and internationalisation strategies, and how they both rely on IC.

Practical implications

The results of this study can be used by managers to support the development of entrepreneurial university strategies.

Originality/value

The paper is novel because it provides theoretical justification to strategy development in a university setting. Additionally, the findings contribute to the fourth stage of IC research by showing how IC can be used to support diversification and internationalisation in a university and support third mission goals. Finally, the paper provides an empirical application of the Secundo et al.’s (2016) model for understanding IC in universities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Musa Shallal

This article examines the myths and the truth of the ancient African civilization. It also sheds some sociological light on the second great Sahelian kingdom of Mali as an…

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1096

Abstract

This article examines the myths and the truth of the ancient African civilization. It also sheds some sociological light on the second great Sahelian kingdom of Mali as an example of the ancient West African kingdoms. It demonstrates the level of civilization, wealth, and power this empire had during the Middle Ages. Also, the ambitiousness of its kings through the discovery of trade routes via the high seas, its level of importance as a cultural, learning and trade centre, the influence of its cities and the development of its urban centres, and its socioeconomic relationships with other African and non‐African peoples. It concludes with a discussion of the influence of the Arabic‐Islamic culture on the Mali Empire and illustrates its points with the advanced culture, and the use of the Dogo people and their exploration of outer space.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1922

THE topics of the Library Association Conference and the election of the Council of the Association naturally absorb a great deal of attention this month. To deal with the…

Abstract

THE topics of the Library Association Conference and the election of the Council of the Association naturally absorb a great deal of attention this month. To deal with the second first: there were few novelties in the nominations, and most of the suggested new Councillors are good people; so that a fairly good Council should result. The unique thing, as we imagine, about the Library Association is the number of vice‐presidents, all of whom have Council privileges. These are not elected by the members but by the Council, and by the retiring Council; they occupy a position analagous to aldermen in town councils, and are not amenable to the choice or desires of the members at large. There are enough of them, too, if they care to be active, to dominate the Council. Fortunately, good men are usually elected, but recently there has been a tendency to elect comparatively young men to what are virtually perpetual seats on the Council, simply, if one may judge from the names, because these men occupy certain library positions. It, therefore; is all the more necessary that the electors see that men who really represent the profession get the seats that remain.

Details

New Library World, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1940

In 1912 Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins reopened the whole question, and investigated again the effects on animals of a synthetic diet. Again he demonstrated the importance…

Abstract

In 1912 Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins reopened the whole question, and investigated again the effects on animals of a synthetic diet. Again he demonstrated the importance of the addition of milk, and in addition he pointed out the importance of the proteins and that some were capable of maintaining life whilst others were inadequate so that animals failed to grow when fed on them. Through this work he systematised previous work and also added an important contribution to our knowledge of nutrition by his discovery of the essential amino acids. These have been extensively studied in recent years, and the following are now regarded as being essential, according to a table by William C. Rose:—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1940

As the result of the increased postal rates and costs of production caused by the war, the Subscription Rates and Sales Prices of the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL will be raised…

Abstract

As the result of the increased postal rates and costs of production caused by the war, the Subscription Rates and Sales Prices of the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL will be raised on June 1st next. The increased prices will be as understated:—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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