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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Helen Francis and John Cowan

This paper seeks to explore changes taking place in a curriculum design for postgraduate teaching in personnel and development, aimed at enhancing lifelong learning. A…

2436

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore changes taking place in a curriculum design for postgraduate teaching in personnel and development, aimed at enhancing lifelong learning. A scheme is described which aims to improve the alignment for professional development of students, in ways that facilitate critically reflective practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on their personal experiences as a programme leader (Master's in HRM) and an educational consultant to describe their strategy for critically reflective continuous professional development (CPD). In doing so, their practice is related to some of the theories underlying critical reflection, and the key challenges in seeking to engage student practitioners in professional development of this kind are drawn out.

Findings

It is argued that achieving an alignment between the development and assessment of student capabilities is vital to the development of critical reflection, and it is explained how the strategy presented for CPD supports self‐management of this process.

Practical implications

Although the paper is grounded in the authors' particular experiences and structure for student support, it is hoped that reflections on these can be of general value to those interested in developing critically reflective practice amongst students which is both effective and practical in the increasingly demanding world of higher education.

Originality/value

The self‐managed process explored in the paper is framed by a social approach to learning that places peer interaction at the forefront of the learning processes involved.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1969

John Cowan

Closed circuit television can be used in undergraduate teaching to increase efficiency and to decrease the total involvement of staff where the classes are large. So far…

Abstract

Closed circuit television can be used in undergraduate teaching to increase efficiency and to decrease the total involvement of staff where the classes are large. So far this aim has generally been achieved in a situation closely related to conventional lecturing practice. The writer believes that television can also be used to advantage with group teaching methods (1) which have hitherto demanded a high proportion of staff contact time.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Russell Waugh and John Godfrey

Reports the results of a qualitative, cross‐sectional studyinvolving a survey of 549 teachers′ perceptions of the Unit Curriculumsystem in 22 metropolitan state senior…

793

Abstract

Reports the results of a qualitative, cross‐sectional study involving a survey of 549 teachers′ perceptions of the Unit Curriculum system in 22 metropolitan state senior high schools in Perth, Western Australia, in the context of system‐wide change, within a centralized educational system. Surveyed perceptions of six general variables applied to the specific case of the Unit Curriculum system. These variables are: perceived cost benefit to the teacher; perceived practicality in the classroom; alleviation of fears and concerns; participation in school decisions on aspects affecting the classrooms; perceived support from senior staff; and feelings towards the previous system compared to the new system. Suggests these variables offer pointers to educational administrators on how best to tailor system‐wide changes so that teachers will be more receptive to the changes in the implementation stage.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Keith Hooper, Kate Kearins and Ruth Green

This paper aims to examine the conceptual arguments surrounding accounting for heritage assets and the resistance by some New Zealand museums to a mandatory valuing of…

8761

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the conceptual arguments surrounding accounting for heritage assets and the resistance by some New Zealand museums to a mandatory valuing of their holdings.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence was derived from museum annual reports, interviews and personal communications with representatives of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of New Zealand (ICANZ) and a range of New Zealand museums.

Findings

ICANZ's requirement that heritage assets be accounted for in a manner similar to other assets is shown as deriving from a managerialist rationality which, in espousing sector neutrality, assumes an unproblematic stance to the particular nature and circumstances of museums and their holdings. Resisting the imposition of the standard, New Zealand's regional museums evince an identity tied more strongly to notions of aesthetic, cultural and social value implicit in curatorship, than to a concern with the economic value of their holdings. Museum managers and accountants prefer to direct their attention to what they see as more vitally important tasks related to the conservation, preservation and maintenance of heritage assets, rather than to divert scarce funds to what they see as an academic exercise in accounting.

Originality/value

The paper points to some of the difficulties inherent in the application of a one‐size‐fits‐all application of an accounting standard to entities and assets differentiated in their purpose and essence.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Financial Derivatives: A Blessing or a Curse?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-245-0

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

John Duff

Explains that current public health policy puts so much emphasis on food and nutrition because the single largest cause of death is nutrition‐related, and also because it…

Abstract

Explains that current public health policy puts so much emphasis on food and nutrition because the single largest cause of death is nutrition‐related, and also because it is easier for a government to promote public health through nutrition than to address ailing health infrastructures or get to grips with adult literacy. Reports, however, the gaps in health equality between different socio‐economic and ethnic groups, and across gender and age. Discusses cultural expectations of a meal and the ideal body. Infers that the higher educational level a person has, the more likely they are to be thin and to occupy a higher place in a hierarchical social structure. Suggests that more food is consumed as snacks – a triumph for mass production, marketing and advertising. Defines what is meant and understood by diet, and evaluates good and bad food. Focuses briefly on traditional food exchanges in Western Samoa and on the use of olive oil in the traditional Mediterranean diet. Indicates that choice of food may be a result of production processes rather than consumer pressure. Explores also the social and cultural interactions of meal times and the role women’s emancipation has played in changing household food and meals. Points out that the lowest socioeconomic groups favour informal takeaways, while the highest socioeconomic groups prefer formal meals out, and, therefore, that the distribution of health and illness is shaped by cultural, social, economic and political forces.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

John M. Johnson

This interpretive biography of Norman K. Denzin traces some of the important turns and moments of his intellectual development and prodigious publication. One focus…

Abstract

This interpretive biography of Norman K. Denzin traces some of the important turns and moments of his intellectual development and prodigious publication. One focus includes his editorial role for the first 52 volumes of Studies in Symbolic Interaction (1978–2020), and how his vision for an inclusive community of qualitative researchers and interpretive scholars emerged and changed.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1959

WE have recently published one or two articles in which a contributor with a considerable knowledge of the Chinese economy has described some of that country's industrial…

Abstract

WE have recently published one or two articles in which a contributor with a considerable knowledge of the Chinese economy has described some of that country's industrial activities. The articles have been scrupulously factual and impartial in revealing the ingenuity which has enabled a people desperately short of the technological resources of the industrialised nations to secure for themselves some of life's essentials.

Details

Work Study, vol. 8 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Susan Stetson-Tiligadas

This chapter outlines potential steps to take in designing active learning experiences based on several theories underlying the learning process. The chapter examines…

Abstract

This chapter outlines potential steps to take in designing active learning experiences based on several theories underlying the learning process. The chapter examines theories of learning and instruction including information processing, schema acquisition, and cognitive load theory. Next follows an explanation of how these theories support problem-centered learning as well as a rationale for the need to help learners develop domain-general, flexible problem-solving skills that will transfer to future needs and contexts. The second half of the chapter focuses on designing active learning experiences based on the selection of real-world problems as the foundation for learning, activating prior knowledge, demonstration of the process or concept, multiple opportunities for practice with relevant scaffolding, and the chance to integrate that knowledge into the learners’ own context based on M. D. Merrill’s (2002) First Principles of Instruction. Examples of assessments, strategies, and activities to foster active, problem-centered learning drawn from the literature are also provided.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Reynold Macpherson

This paper reports the planning processes used in one of New Zealand’s premier schools of fine art. Elam has a culture of exuberant individualism, high productivity and…

Abstract

This paper reports the planning processes used in one of New Zealand’s premier schools of fine art. Elam has a culture of exuberant individualism, high productivity and disciplinary sectionalism. There is a belief that it is cantankerously and inevitably unbiddable, and yet, paradoxically, it is well enough organised to shape New Zealand’s cultural identity, consistently producing some of its finest visual artists and designers. Processes were drawn from action research, organisational development and educative leadership theory to develop a collective purpose with goals and objectives, and program plans and budgets for 1998. It is shown that there was no “minor miracle” involved, just the death of a myth about Elam’s incapacity to learn as a School.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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