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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

John Chelliah

This paper highlights the risks faced by white-collar workers resulting from advances in artificial intelligence (AI).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper highlights the risks faced by white-collar workers resulting from advances in artificial intelligence (AI).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores recent research and expert opinion on the evolution of AI and its encroachment on white-collar jobs.

Findings

This paper reveals susceptibility of white-collar jobs to AI.

Practical implications

This paper guides HR practitioners in advising management on the possible deployment of AI to enhance productivity and the resultant impact in the roles that employees perform.

Social implications

This study draws attention to the risks associated with the deployment of AI and as a consequence the loss of white-collar jobs.

Originality/value

This study raises the issue of how AI could disrupt the workplace by usurping white-collar jobs and creates awareness of the need for people in vulnerable white-collar jobs to re-think their careers and for HR practitioners to manage the change that this disruption will bring.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

John Chelliah

This paper aims to highlight the risks faced by companies through the use of child labor in their outsourced global supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the risks faced by companies through the use of child labor in their outsourced global supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores recent research and commentary on child labor in global supply chains.

Findings

This paper reveals the risk of brand damage to large organizations as a result of child labor inputs in their supply chains.

Practical implications

This study guides practitioners of human resources in advising management on strategic and tactical approaches in sanitizing supply chains of child labor.

Social implications

This paper draws attention to the risks associated with the presence of child labor in the supply chain and need for large companies to practice social responsibility beyond their borders.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates how child labor is not just an ethical issue but a legal one as well and how injustices suffered by children can through public awareness campaigns destroy brand value of the ultimate benefactor companies.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

John Chelliah

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the risks faced by employers as a result of subjecting vulnerable employees to exploitative business practices that are akin to slavery.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the risks faced by employers as a result of subjecting vulnerable employees to exploitative business practices that are akin to slavery.

Design/methodology/approach

The study considers examples of exploitative approaches that employers have recently adopted.

Findings

The paper reveals that employers should be aware of the serious legal consequences including imprisonment that could result from slavery like business practices.

Research limitations/implications

Guides managers in preventing claims of slavery.

Practical implications

The paper serves to guide managers in preventing claims of slavery or exploitation.

Social implications

It helps to draw attention to the risks associated with exploitative labour practices at the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper aims to raise the issue of organizational awareness and preparedness to prevent predatory or exploitative employment practices.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

John Chelliah and Yogita Swamy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of deceit as a business strategy. There is ample evidence in the mainstream media of deceitful strategies in business, yet…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of deceit as a business strategy. There is ample evidence in the mainstream media of deceitful strategies in business, yet there is a lack of discovery of deceit as a strategic tool in the mainstream literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that first explains deceit and interprets the use of deceit as strategic tool in business using case vignettes as evidence. The paper puts forth a convincing case that there is enough evidence to substantiate our proposition that deceit is indeed part of the repertoire of tools utilised by some businesses.

Findings

The value of this paper is that it highlights why deceit is used strategically to achieve profit motives of businesses.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to fill a gap that exists in the extant literature and would especially benefit management practitioners and business academics in appreciating the use of deceit as a business strategy.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

John Chelliah and Anita Prasad

The paper aims to present typologies of transnational money laundering in South Pacific island countries, thereby filling a gap in the extant literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to present typologies of transnational money laundering in South Pacific island countries, thereby filling a gap in the extant literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on seven significant transnational money laundering cases involving South Pacific island nations. It provides analyses of the modus operandi of criminals and classifies those according to typologies from anti-money laundering authorities and bodies.

Findings

Typologies of money laundering have arrived through a content analysis of seven cases involving transnational money laundering destined for South Pacific island nations. The typologies which have emerged show the predominant forms of transnational money laundering in this region. This knowledge could be useful to government policy-makers and financial institutions pursuing anti-money laundering initiatives.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of academic research into typologies of transnational money laundering involving the South Pacific. This paper makes a useful contribution to the extant literature by providing the most recent typologies in this respect.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

John Chelliah and Brian D'Netto

To determine the factors associated with arbitration awards in unfair dismissal complaints under Australian federal legislation and to assess whether employees benefit…

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the factors associated with arbitration awards in unfair dismissal complaints under Australian federal legislation and to assess whether employees benefit from arbitration.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involves an empirical analysis of 342 decisions in 17 industries by arbitrators in the Australian Industrial Relations Commission over the four year period 1997‐2000. Logistic and ordinary least squares regression are used to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that 50.6 per cent of arbitration decisions were in favour of employees and only 10.8 per cent of complainants were reinstated. Independent variables which are significantly associated with each of the three dependent variables are identified.

Research implications/limitations

The results of this study enable researchers to gain a deeper understanding of the arbitration process and recognise independent variables that are associated with the arbitrator's decision in unfair dismissal cases.

Practical implications

Employers lose half the unfair dismissal cases that go to arbitration. To reduce legal and associated costs, employers may need to look at ways of creating a more harmonious workplace. Employees do not benefit much from arbitration and have little chance of reclaiming their jobs. Reaching a settlement through mediation may be a better option.

Originality/value

This is the first study to assess arbitration decisions in Australia. By developing a conceptual model based on arbitration outcomes and structuring the analysis on this model, the paper presents a logical understanding of the factors that drive arbitration decisions and remedies.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

John Chelliah

Highlights the risks employers face in disciplining employees for inappropriate behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

Highlights the risks employers face in disciplining employees for inappropriate behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Considers the types of approach that are necessary for a fair disciplinary process.

Findings

Reveals that an employer's policies governing inappropriate behavior are worthless unless employees are educated on these policies and the consequences of breaching these policies are clearly communicated.

Practical implications

Guides managers in successfully defending claims of unfair dismissal for inappropriate behavior.

Social implications

Draws attention to the risks associated with the access and storage of pornography at the workplace.

Originality/value

Raises the issue of organizational awareness and preparedness to undertake challenges posed by inappropriate behavior.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Rajul G. Joshi, John Chelliah and Veera Ramanathan

The purpose of this paper is to stir the deliberation on understanding grassroots innovation (GI) phenomenon through the lived experience approach and attempt to address…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to stir the deliberation on understanding grassroots innovation (GI) phenomenon through the lived experience approach and attempt to address the existing void in current literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper outlines a human science research approach for studying the subjective reality embedded in the GI phenomenon. Such an approach provides a better and more bottom-up understanding of the underlying individual and interpersonal dynamics shaping the GI.

Findings

This study provides a richer understanding of the underlying individual and interpersonal dynamics shaping the GI phenomena. This may serve as an aid for future research on scaling, managing GI and developing entrepreneurial capabilities of the grassroots innovators (GIrs). The study also confirms that no single unilateral theory can fully explain the lived experiences of the GIrs at the ideation, opportunity recognition, prototyping and scaling stage of GI. Rather, it is quintessential to have an integrated holistic perspective for understanding GI. This study also highlights the importance of hermeneutic phenomenology in pro-poor innovation research and practice in the near future.

Research limitations/implications

This paper’s main limitation is whether the findings can be generalized in a wider context. The authors acknowledge this limitation. However, the purpose of this study is not to generalize the findings but rather provide a contextual understanding of what constitutes the lived experiences of GI. The authors recommend that a future study covering greater number of GIrs across India be undertaken to gain a better appreciation of the bigger picture.

Originality/value

Systematic approaches for tapping into GI are conspicuously non-existent and hence a contextual understanding through the proposed holistic lens will assist in thriving of the GI phenomena in South Asian countries such as India.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

James Field and John Chelliah

This paper aims to highlight the difficulties faced by employers in complying with a quick succession of industrial‐relations legislation changes in Australia in recent times.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the difficulties faced by employers in complying with a quick succession of industrial‐relations legislation changes in Australia in recent times.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the results of a field survey of 352 Australian organizations undertaken between August and December 2009. The survey was completed by businesses in every state and territory in Australia except the Northern Territory. Collectively, the organizations surveyed employed more than 100,000 staff.

Findings

The paper reveals that the major challenge for most businesses appears to be the ability to maintain an effective human resources (HR) infrastructure to cope with the pace of industrial relations legislation changes in recent times.

Practical implications

The paper gives an insight into the level of risk that Australian employers face as a result of legislative non‐compliance. It guides managers and HR specialists in assessing the exposure of their organizations/clients to the risks identified.

Social implications

The paper reveals that a significant proportion of Australian businesses are failing to comply with the provisions of recent industrial‐relations legislation.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on organizational awareness and preparedness to undertake changes to meet changing legislative requirements and the potentially damaging outcomes associated with non‐compliance.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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