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Article

John Cameron, Rebecca Tiessen, Kate Grantham and Taryn Husband-Ceperkovic

Debates about the role of liberal arts education in finding employment highlight both its benefits and the challenges of finding work after graduation – debates that are…

Abstract

Purpose

Debates about the role of liberal arts education in finding employment highlight both its benefits and the challenges of finding work after graduation – debates that are now well-documented and outlined in this paper. Adding to these debates, the purpose of this paper is to bring in the voices of recent graduates from social sciences and humanities programs who have firsthand and recent experience as they enter the professional job market. Their experiences guide our understanding of the nature of liberal arts programs and shed light on areas of improvement in line with improved career paths and employment outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved a quantitative data study using an online survey completed by 1,901 graduates.

Findings

A survey completed by 1,901 graduates of IDS programs in Canada provided rich data about the challenges and opportunities of their education in relation to professional employment. Additional follow-up qualitative data provided by survey participants was also analyzed.

Practical implications

From these findings, several implications for curriculum design are highlighted to strengthen (not replace or alter) existing program offerings. Implications for curriculum design: The quantitative data and narrative responses from the survey of IDS graduates on their career paths highlight several important considerations for IDS and other liberal arts programs that are grappling with questions about whether and how to redesign curricula to better address concerns about the employability of students.

Social implications

The central lesson from this research is that the perspectives of university graduates can provide valuable insights for debates about the roles of universities and the design of university curricula. While the voices of university administrators, professors, politicians, industry leaders and media pundits are all prominent in these debates, the perspectives of graduates are often left out, despite their firsthand experience in making the transition from campus to career.

Originality/value

This research project offers one model that other fields of study could follow to learn more from their graduates about the competencies and skills which they most value in navigating complex career paths and overcoming barriers to professional employment.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article

David Sands

What will be the largest shopping and leisure complex in Europe, the Metro Centre, opened on a site three miles outside Newcastle in October. Consisting of two million…

Abstract

What will be the largest shopping and leisure complex in Europe, the Metro Centre, opened on a site three miles outside Newcastle in October. Consisting of two million square feet of shopping enclosed in a glass‐covered mall half a mile long, the Metro Centre can boast a glittering roll‐call of prestigious retail names as tenants — Carrefour, Marks & Spencer (their first out of town venture), BHS, Boots, House of Fraser — you name it, they're there. The Metro Centre owes much to the vision of John Hall, of Cameron Hall Developments, who seems quite unfazed by the 23 per cent unemployment in the region and the fact that Gateshead is one of the nation's economic black spots. In this feature David Sands talks to John Hall about his concept of shopping centres, and also discusses the likely impact of the project on Newcastle city centre and particularly Eldon Square.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Jackie W. Deem, Pam J. DeLotell and Kathryn Kelly

This study investigates the relationship between employment status (full time (FT)/part time (PT)), organizational culture and institutional effectiveness in higher…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between employment status (full time (FT)/part time (PT)), organizational culture and institutional effectiveness in higher education. The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, “Does the growing population of PT faculty preclude effective cultures from developing and, accordingly, adversely affect institutional effectiveness?”

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveyed 159 PT faculty and 65 FT faculty from seven schools of an online, proprietary university. The instrument, consisting of the Organizational Culture Survey Instrument and demographic questions, was distributed and data collected utilizing an online survey application. Statistical analysis methods including descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and correlation analysis were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study found no significant differences between perceptions of organizational culture or institutional effectiveness FT and PT faculty. Inter-school differences in perceptions were identified. Further research in this area is warranted to investigate discipline as a cause for the inter-school differences.

Research limitations/implications

The study included respondents from only one online university. Therefore, additional studies involving traditional, ground based and hybrid institutions are required to establish generalizability. Additionally, self-assessments of institutional effectiveness were used. Future studies should consider quantitative research models for the measurement of institutional effectiveness.

Practical implications

The study indicates that PT faculty are not less committed to the institution than their FT counterparts. This strengthens the case for using PT faculty, particularly in an online environment.

Originality/value

This study investigates the relationship between organizational culture and institutional effectiveness in higher education from the faculty perspective. This has not been done before.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

John Cameron and Hemant Ojha

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility of a procedural deliberative alternative to an atomistic conception of individuals and an economic logic of markets…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility of a procedural deliberative alternative to an atomistic conception of individuals and an economic logic of markets or a priori universal lists, as ethical foundation for evaluating socio‐economic change.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop this argument, the paper combines a modified Kantian categorical imperative with deliberative ethics drawing on the writings of Habermas and Dewey. The journey through the European Enlightenment thought of Kant to the contemporary thought of Habermas and Bourdieu aims at mapping continuity and change in key themes in development ethics. These ideas are then given practical application in a case‐study of the people‐forestry interface in Nepal.

Findings

The paper shows how Kantian non‐deception links to Habermas' notion of communicative action and Dewey's notion of cooperative inquiry, and how Kantian non‐coercion links to the inclusion of subaltern voices. While the paper proposes that more open deliberative processes can potentially produce ethical gains, it also identifies an idealistic risk in this position. Bourdieu's thinking is utilised to reveal limitations on improving deliberative processes where there are powerful mechanisms reproducing inequalities.

Practical implications

The paper makes the case for greater attention being given to exploring deliberative processes as a prerequisite for ethical developmental actions.

Originality/value

The paper brings together authors who rarely feature in the development studies discourse and applies their ideas to a practical case study.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

Cem Canel, Steve Mahar, Drew Rosen and John Taylor

Healthcare providers need the information contained in patient records to provide high‐quality services. To be effective, patient record assembly must be completed in a…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare providers need the information contained in patient records to provide high‐quality services. To be effective, patient record assembly must be completed in a timely manner. This study aims to analyse the medical records assembly process for a hospital in Southeastern United States having difficulty meeting standard completion times established by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Several quality improvement tools were used to evaluate and improve the assembly process.

Findings

As a result of the study, a new procedure was implemented. Consequently, the hospital reduced the time required to assemble medical records, thereby improving efficiency and effectiveness. There are hopes to further improve the process.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides guidance on how statistical process control techniques can be applied to improve hospital services. The techniques employed can be used to analyze and improve any process. However, results are limited to improving medical record assembly processes at one particular hospital.

Originality/value

Past studies considered the application of various statistical process control techniques for improving healthcare quality. The study extends research by employing process improvement efforts to understand and develop medical record assembly in a regional hospital via process flow diagramming and control charts.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article

Des Gasper

The purpose of this paper is to present exploration of themes that interconnect six studies in environmentally and socially sustainable human development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present exploration of themes that interconnect six studies in environmentally and socially sustainable human development.

Design/methodology/approach

The article presents an overview of the papers included in this special issue.

Findings

As humanity threatens to undermine its habitat, a social economics returns to core concepts and themes that became expunged from neoclassical economics: serious examination of persons, seen as more than given points of desire; a broadened perspective on types of good, including a non‐neoclassical conception of public goods as publicly deliberated priority goods that are not well managed through free markets and “common goods” as shared bases vital for everyone; study of what commodities and goods do to and for people; a central role for public reasoning about which are public priority goods, rather than using only a technical definition of a public good; an acceptance of notions of ethical responsibility and responsibilities concerning the provision and maintenance of public priority goods determined through public reasoning; and attention to institutional formats for such deliberation. Amongst the greatest of public priority “goods” are the concepts of common good and responsibility.

Research limitations/Implications

The findings reinforce the agenda of socio‐economics for central attention to the mutual conditioning of economy, society, polity, and environment, including analysis of the sociocultural formation of economic actors and of ideas of “common good”.

Originality/value

Cross‐fertilization of theorization with cases from Costa Rica, Kenya, Nepal, Thailand, Rwanda, sub‐Saharan Africa and global arenas.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Case study

Frank Shipper and Richard C. Hoffman

This case has multiple theoretical linkages at the micro-organizational behavior level (e.g. job enrichment), but it is best analyzed and understood when examined at the…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

This case has multiple theoretical linkages at the micro-organizational behavior level (e.g. job enrichment), but it is best analyzed and understood when examined at the organizational level. Students will learn about shared entrepreneurship, high performance work systems, shared leadership and virtuous organizations, and how they can develop a sustainable competitive advantage.

Research methodology

The case was prepared using a qualitative approach. Data were collected via the following ways: literature search; organizational documents and published historical accounts; direct observations by a research team; and on-site audio recorded and transcribed individual and group interviews conducted by a research team (the authors) with organization members at multiple levels of the firm.

Case overview/synopsis

John Lewis Company has been in business since 1864. In 1929, it became the John Lewis Partnership (JLP) when the son of the founder sold a portion of the firm to the employees. In 1955, he sold his remaining interest to the employee/partners. JLP has a constitution and has a representative democracy governance structure. As the firm approaches the 100th anniversary of the trust, it is faced with multiple challenges. The partners are faced with the question – How to respond to the environmental turmoil?

Complexity academic level

This case has environmental issues – How to respond to competition, technological changes and environmental uncertainty and an internal issue – How can high performance work practices provide a sustainable competitive advantage? Both issues can be examined in strategic management courses after the students have studied traditionally managed companies. This case could also be used in human resource management courses.

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Book part

Charles M. Cameron, John M. de Figueiredo and David E. Lewis

We examine personnel policies and careers in public agencies, particularly how wages and promotion standards can partially offset a fundamental contracting problem: the…

Abstract

We examine personnel policies and careers in public agencies, particularly how wages and promotion standards can partially offset a fundamental contracting problem: the inability of public-sector workers to contract on performance, and the inability of political masters to contract on forbearance from meddling. Despite the dual contracting problem, properly constructed personnel policies can encourage intrinsically motivated public-sector employees to invest in expertise, seek promotion, remain in the public sector, and work hard. To do so requires internal personnel policies that sort “slackers” from “zealots.” Personnel policies that accomplish this task are quite different in agencies where acquired expertise has little value in the private sector, and agencies where acquired expertise commands a premium in the private sector. Even with well-designed personnel policies, an inescapable trade-off between political control and expertise acquisition remains.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

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Article

Sandra C. Jones and John D. Rossiter

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of portrayed smoking status of actors on their popularity with both smoking and non‐smoking young people, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of portrayed smoking status of actors on their popularity with both smoking and non‐smoking young people, as well as their perceptions of the prevalence of smoking

Design/methodology/approach

Two experimental studies were conducted with Australian undergraduate university students, in which students were exposed to different versions of mock magazines featuring images of actors smoking and not smoking, as well as control actors.

Findings

The attitudes of young people towards well‐known actors were little influenced by the presence or absence of cigarettes, but non‐smoking actors were perceived more favourably when depicted in a group with smoking actors. Smoking actors tended to be preferred by young people who smoked. The results of both studies confirm that young people's estimates of smoking prevalence are considerably inflated.

Originality/value

The results of the current study suggest two key implications for health education: the need to address young people's elevated perceptions of smoking prevalence among their peers, parents, and celebrities by communicating the social norm of non‐smoking; and the potential use of celebrities – such as actors – as spokespersons or role models in anti‐smoking campaigns.

Details

Health Education, vol. 108 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article

Kenneth E. Hart

The intent here is to present a representative, though not exhaustive, review of some recent empirical and theoretical literature on stress and the management of stress in…

Abstract

The intent here is to present a representative, though not exhaustive, review of some recent empirical and theoretical literature on stress and the management of stress in occupational settings. The paper begins with a synopsis of the financial cost to the employer of unchecked excessive levels of employee stress. The next section reviews some examples of empirically‐based research supporting the clinical and cost effectiveness of current Occupational Stress Management (OSM) programmes. This is followed by a discussion of recent evidence showing that the “traditional” (corporate) approach to OSM is incomplete and insufficient. Towards the end of the article, an idealised, comprehensive, biopsychosocioecological transactional model of OSM is outlined. Finally, methodological limitations of traditional OSM programmes are discussed, and it is suggested that future studies might consider utilising a multilevel‐multimethod “triangulation” measurement approach.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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