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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2021

Charles Kawalya, Francis Kasekende and John C. Munene

The purpose of this paper is to examine how psychological capital (PsyCap) and self-driven personality fuse to affect happiness at work in the nursing profession in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how psychological capital (PsyCap) and self-driven personality fuse to affect happiness at work in the nursing profession in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a cross-sectional descriptive and analytical design. The authors use structural equation modelling to test hypotheses. Using proportionate and simple random sampling procedures, a sample of 900 respondents was drawn from different hospitals in Uganda of which a response rate of 88.9% was obtained.

Findings

The magnitude effect of self-driven personality on happiness at work depends on PsyCap, implying that the assumption of non-additivity is met.

Research limitations/implications

Only a single research methodological approach was used, and future research through interviews could be undertaken to triangulate.

Practical implications

To boost happiness at the workplace, heads of hospitals should always endeavour to find a viable self-driven personality and PsyCap blend that can add value to nurses’ happiness in Uganda.

Social implications

It is essential for health human resource managers to understand, how self-driven personality and PsyCap foster happiness among nurses in Uganda.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that focus on testing the interactive effects of PsyCap on the relationship between self-driven personality and happiness at the workplace in Uganda’s health sector.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Abstract

Subject area

Corporate entrepreneurship; Intrapreneurship; Human Resources.

Study level/applicability

MBA students in Human Resource, entrepreneurship and/or PhD students in the areas of Human Resource, Corporate Entrepreneurship and/or on Intrapreneurship studies.

Case overview

This case reveals that progressive change originated from individual’s positive deviance approaches, opportunistic sensitivity, ability to learn, evaluate and the ability to develop ideas on how to exploit or pursue identified opportunities (intrapreneurial behaviour).

Expected learning outcomes

The student will learn to deal with the complex nature of organisations and the tendencies of institutional processes to be uncertain, unpredictable, and uncontrollable; appreciate the internal workings of an organisation, the external environment; and understand the role of generative leadership, positive deviance, novelty ecosystems and intrapreneurial behaviour and the fact that connections and interactions in a social network are non-linear or non-proportional. This means that complex system predictions can be much more than simple regression predictions. They will be able to apply both bottom-up and top-down influences from proactive leadership or generative leadership events and benefit from positive results and the emergence of innovation.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 3 Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Francis Kasekende, John C. Munene, Joseph M. Ntayi and Augustine Ahiauzu

The purpose of this paper is to address the building blocks for psychological contract among public institutions in Uganda by investigating the mediation effect of leader-member…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the building blocks for psychological contract among public institutions in Uganda by investigating the mediation effect of leader-member exchanges (LMX) in the relationship between perceived environmental dynamism and psychological contract.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use structural equation modelling (AMOS) to investigate the hypotheses.

Findings

LMX is a significant mediator in the association between generational work values and psychological contract and technological advancement and psychological contract among employees in public institutions in Uganda.

Practical implications

At commissions and agencies level, generational work values and technological advancement seem to create better effects on employee-employer unwritten expectations and obligations when they go through LMX. This has important implications for the investment in and outcomes of these LMX endeavours from both the employer and the employee.

Originality/value

The study is one of the pioneers to demonstrate that the presence of LMX reflected in the form of a dyadic relationship helps to extend the positive effects generational work values and technological advancement have on psychological contract.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, John C. Munene, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Charles Akol Malinga

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of individual components of financial literacy in promoting financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of individual components of financial literacy in promoting financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was cross-sectional combined with correlation and regression analyses. Data were collected from 400 poor households drawn from four regions in rural Uganda. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test for the contribution of individual components of financial literacy on financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis was used to establish existence of convergent validity between the items used to measure the different constructs under study. Furthermore, analysis of variance was also adopted to test for variation in perceptions of poor households on being financially included.

Findings

The results generated from the study revealed that only attitude as a component of financial literacy significantly and positively predicts financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda. Contrary to previous thinking and empirical studies, behavior, knowledge, and skills are not significant predictors of financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda. Overall, the combined effect of the different components of financial literacy explains about 11.2 percent of the variance in financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

The study was not without limitations. The study adopted only cross-sectional study design, thus, leaving out longitudinal study. Therefore, future studies employing longitudinal research design worth undertaking. Furthermore, the sample although large enough focused only on poor households located in rural Uganda, therefore, ignoring peri-urban and urban areas in Uganda. Besides, the study used only quantitative data, thus, qualitative study using key informant interviews may be considered for further research.

Practical implications

The paper indicates that policy makers, advocates of financial inclusion and researchers, should reconsider investigating individual contribution of the different components of financial literacy in promoting financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda. For researchers, it is important to re-analyze the individual components of financial literacy of behavior, knowledge, skills, and attitude in influencing financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda.

Originality/value

This paper combines both functional components (behavior and attitude) and non-functional measures (knowledge and skills) of financial literacy to explain financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda. Most financial literacy studies have mainly adopted only non-functional measures of knowledge and skills. Besides, these studies ignore the individual contribution of functional components and non-functional measures of financial literacy in explaining financial inclusion of poor households. Thus, this study is the first to examine the impact of individual components of financial literacy in explaining financial inclusion of poor households in rural Uganda.

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and John C. Munene

The purpose of this paper is to establish the mediating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion among poor…

1660

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the mediating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion among poor households in Uganda with a specific focus on Mokono district.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a cross-sectional design. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), which adopted Analysis of Moment Structures to test for mediating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion.

Findings

The results revealed that financial literacy had a partial mediating effect in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion. Furthermore, the results indicated that while institutional framing has a direct effect on financial inclusion, it also exerts an indirect effect through financial literacy. This supports the argument that institutional framing that structure the way how poor households interpret, evaluate, comprehend and make sound financial decisions and choices, is enhanced by knowledge and skills acquired through financial literacy by poor households.

Research limitations/implications

This study has been limited by adopting only cross-sectional design and quantitative research approach, therefore ignoring longitudinal design and qualitative research approach. Besides, the study uses SEM bootstrap approach and ignores MedGraph method, which is also recommended for testing mediation.

Practical implications

Since the results suggest that institutional framing of poor households are partially enhanced by financial literacy to increase financial inclusion, policy makers, practitioners and managers of financial institutions should ensure extending financial literacy programs closer to the poor in order to expand the scope of financial inclusion beyond the current sphere. Indeed, financial literacy programs will boost cognitive abilities of poor households resulting into better financial decisions and choices and, hence increase in demand and consumption of financial services.

Originality/value

The study significantly generates empirical evidence by testing the mediating role of financial literacy in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion using SEM bootstrap approach. The study portrays the influential partial effect of financial literacy in enhancing institutional frames of poor households in order to cause improvement in financial inclusion. Indeed, financial literacy programs that entail acquisition of financial knowledge and skills boost cognitive abilities of poor households to easily interpret, evaluate, comprehend meanings, and take correct decisions and actions on financial matters. The mediating effect of financial literacy in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion seems to be lacking in literature and theory. Thus, the paper is the first to relate the influential partial effect of financial literacy in the relationship between institutional framing and financial inclusion among poor households, especially in a developing country context.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Benard Alkali Soepding, John C. Munene and Laura Orobia

Little is known about how self-determination and financial attitude are linked to retirees’ financial well-being in Nigerian context. Drawing from the theory of reasoned action…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about how self-determination and financial attitude are linked to retirees’ financial well-being in Nigerian context. Drawing from the theory of reasoned action, the purpose of this paper is to examine the connection of self-determination, financial attitude and financial well-being. Also, this paper examines the mediating role of financial attitude between self-determination and financial well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was used in collecting quantitative data from 399 retirees drawn from North Central Nigeria. Hypotheses are tested through structural equation modelling using the Analysis of Moments of Structures (AMOS) software, version 23.

Findings

Results from the research indicate that financial attitude serves as a trajectory through which self-determination leads to financial well-being. Therefore, self-determination and financial attitude significantly contribute to the financial well-being of retirees.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a cross-sectional design may undermine the causal conclusions of the findings. This study adds to existing research on financial well-being by showing that financial attitude is significant in attaining financial well-being and how self-determination variable impact financial well-being.

Originality/value

This study contributes to literature by establishing the mediating role of financial attitude in the relationship between self-determination and financial well-being. Thus, instead of concentrating on only the direct effects of self-determination and financial well-being, the indirect effect of financial attitude is tested.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, Pierre Yourougou and John C. Munene

Premised on the assertion that financial digitalization is currently the panacea and game changer in delivering progress towards the sustainable development goals (SDGs) through…

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Abstract

Purpose

Premised on the assertion that financial digitalization is currently the panacea and game changer in delivering progress towards the sustainable development goals (SDGs) through universal financial inclusion, especially in developing countries, the purpose of this paper is to establish the moderating effect of transaction tax exemptions in the relationship between mobile money adoption and usage and financial inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 379 micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs), which use mobile money services drawn from the Northern District of Gulu in Uganda to provide responses for this study. The predictive relevancy and the effect size of the model were determined by running partial least square algorithm through structural equation model (SEM) with 5,000 bootstrap samples in SmartPLS-SEM 3.0.

Findings

The findings indicated that all the latent variables of transaction tax exemptions showed significant and positive impact on mobile money adoption and usage to advance financial inclusion in developing countries. Moreover, when combined together, the overall SEM predictive model revealed a significant moderating effect of transaction tax exemptions in the relationship between mobile money adoption and usage and financial inclusion. This implies that transaction tax exemptions on digital financial innovations such as the mobile money services can stimulate economic growth through increased level of financial inclusion labeled as the main enabler in achieving the SDGs by the year 2030.

Research limitations/implications

Whereas data were collected from users of mobile money services, the samples were drawn specifically from MSMEs’ owners located in the Northern District of Gulu in Uganda. Thus, users located in other districts were not included in the sample for this study. Similarly, this study limited itself to only financial services offered through the mobile money platform. It ignored other digital financial channels such as the internet and electronic banking.

Practical implications

Going forward, in order to improve the economic well-being of households at the “bottom of the pyramid,” governments in developing countries should embrace the significant role of transaction tax exemptions in promoting digital financial innovations such as the mobile money services for increased level of financial inclusion. The governments in developing countries where mobile money has greatly spurred financial inclusion should not only reduce the existing transaction taxes on mobile money services but scrap it off in order to champion progressive increase in the level of universal financial inclusion prescribed as a key enabler in eliminating global poverty, especially in developing countries.

Originality/value

This study hints on the moderating effect of transaction tax exemptions in the relationship between mobile money adoption and usage and financial inclusion. The paradox in the current trends on transaction taxes on mobile money services, especially in developing countries remain a dearth in the nascent global FINTECH ecosystem.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Catherine Komugisha Tindiwensi, Ernest Abaho, John C. Munene, Moses Muhwezi and Isaac N. Nkote

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how entrepreneurial bricolage empowers smallholder commercial farming, from a family business perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how entrepreneurial bricolage empowers smallholder commercial farming, from a family business perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a multiple case study design to analyse entrepreneurial bricolage in smallholder commercial farming in Uganda. It used multiple data collection methods and applied content analytical tchniques to establish cross-case correlations, patterns and relationships to aid in theory development and testing.

Findings

The study shows that entrepreneurial bricolage empowers smallholder commercialization through resource reallocation, improvization and prioritization as interconnected, self-reinforcing bricolage processes in smallholder farming. It provides evidence of how smallholder farms may not enact institutional limits, and overcome constraints imposed by their resource environments. It further reveals that smallholder commercial farms can be construed as family businesses given the interconnected relationship between farming business, family and smallholder farm(er).

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in smallholder farms hence results may be used cautiously in other sectors and economies where resource environments are not structurally defined. However, it provides lessons for family businesses in developed countries particularly the micro- and small businesses. It also renders smallholder farming as a lucrative area for family business research.

Originality/value

This study deepens our understanding of bricolage in smallholder farming and provides a springboard for scholarship in enhancing smallholder commercialization. It proposes a model for entrepreneurial bricolage in smallholder commercial farming.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Florence Nansubuga and John C. Munene

The knowledge management (KM) models in the African organisations are influenced by the interplay between human agents from diverse societies whose experiences, values, contextual…

Abstract

Purpose

The knowledge management (KM) models in the African organisations are influenced by the interplay between human agents from diverse societies whose experiences, values, contextual information and insights that are perceived controversial in Africa. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the indigenous assumptions related to knowledge and its management in Africa and the perceived contradictions in the existing models by adopting the Ubuntu philosophy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a perspective lens to examine the existing management practices and propose an integrated framework that is appropriate for the utilisation of the Ubuntu epistemic knowledge management practices and at the same time provide highlights on the perceived paradoxes and how they can be managed to improve knowledge management and people management in African societies.

Findings

The inductive posteriori knowledge approach is perceived to be dynamic, applicable and more desirable in the African societies as it allows organisational managers and their work teams to embrace knowledge construction, dependent on experiences in form of stories and metaphors that demonstrate successful work samples. The Ubuntu dramaturgical knowledge management approach adds value to the posteriori knowledge by refining the rhetoric stories and metaphors into empirical performance scripts that are tailored to the audiences’ expectations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper adapted a perspective view to explain knowledge management; therefore, it was not possible to provide empirical data on the metaphysical and dramaturgical elements that are assumed to influence knowledge management in Africa. However, based on theoretical analysis, the authors have proposed a coherent knowledge management framework based on the interaction between posteriori KM assumptions and Ubuntu dramaturgy.

Practical implications

Ubuntu ideology has been appreciated since it treasures interdependency and interconnectedness among people. Therefore, collaborating partners working in Africa would be expected to act as interdependent agents, whereby this interdependency is perceived as an integral part of the knowledge management process. The proposed Ubuntu knowledge management model is grounded on the posteriori knowledge approach which assumes that experience is the source of knowledge. Through social interactions and experiences sharing, organisational members can create new processes, innovative technologies and dynamic context based performance scripts that can drive productivity.

Social implications

The authors concluded that a coherent framework that is tailored to social interactions and contextual needs of the people and their communities can promote productive knowledge and knowledge management systems in the African contexts. Moreover knowledge management requires one to acknowledge the complexity of Ubuntu ideology in a sense that it recognises the past experiences and contributions of the diverse individuals in the same community/organisation.

Originality/value

This paper focused on examining how the Ubuntu philosophy can promote knowledge development and management strategies that are tailored to social and contextual needs of the organisations in Africa to curtail the perceived paradoxes in the existing knowledge management models.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, John C. Munene, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Charles Akol Malinga

The purpose of this paper is to test for the predictive power of each of the dimensions of social network in explaining financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test for the predictive power of each of the dimensions of social network in explaining financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a cross-sectional research design and data were collected from a total of 400 poor households located in Northern, Eastern, Central and Western Uganda. The authors adopted ordinary least square hierarchical regression analysis to test for the predictive power of each of the dimensions of social network in explaining financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda. The effects were determined by calculating the significant change in coefficient of determination (R2) between the dimensions of social network in explaining financial inclusion. In addition, analysis of variance was also used to test for variation in perceptions of the poor about being financially included.

Findings

The findings revealed that the dimensions of ties and interaction significantly explain financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda. Contrary to previous studies, the results indicated that interdependence as a dimension of social network is not a significant predictor of financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda. Combined together, the dimensions of social network explains about 16.6 percent of the variation in financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

The study was purely cross-sectional, thus, ignoring longitudinal survey design, which could have investigated certain characteristics of the variable over time. Additionally, although a total sample amounting to 400 poor households was used in the study, the results cannot be generalized since other equally marginalized groups such as the disabled persons, refugees, and immigrants were not included in this study. Furthermore, the study used only the questionnaire to elicit responses from the respondents. The use of interview was ignored during data collection.

Practical implications

Policy makers, managers of financial institutions, and financial inclusion advocates should consider social network dimensions of ties and interaction as conduits for information flow and sharing among the poor including the women and youth about scarce financial resources like loans. Advocacy towards creation of societal network that brings the poor together in strong and weak ties is very important in scaling up access to and use of scarce financial services for improving economic and social well-being.

Originality/value

Contrary to previous studies, this particular study test the predictive power of each of the dimensions of social network in explaining financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda. Thus, it methodologically isolates the individual contribution of each of the dimensions of social network in explaining financial inclusion of the poor. The authors found that only ties and interaction are significant predictors of financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda. Therefore, the findings suggest that not all dimensions of social network are significant predictors of financial inclusion as opposed to previous empirical findings.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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