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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

John Boudreau and Wayne Cascio

While human capital analytics (HCA) recently has developed enormous interest, most organizations still find themselves struggling to move from operational reporting to…

Abstract

Purpose

While human capital analytics (HCA) recently has developed enormous interest, most organizations still find themselves struggling to move from operational reporting to analytics. The purpose of this paper is to explore why that is the case and can be done to change that.

Design/methodology/approach

Referring to the “LAMP” model, the authors stress four elements as potential reasons why HCA are not sufficiently being “pushed” toward their audience, namely, logic, analytics, measures, and process. Similarly, they name five conditions why the wider use of HCA is not “pulled” in by the analytics user.

Findings

The authors investigations show that these “push” and “pull” factors behind the lack of greater use of HCA represent fertile ground for future research and implications for practitioners on both ends.

Practical implications

These “push” and “pull” factors behind the lack of greater use of HCA represent fertile ground for future research and implications for practitioners on both ends.

Originality/value

These “push” and “pull” factors behind the lack of greater use of HCA represent fertile ground for future research and implications for practitioners on both ends.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Christopher John Boudreaux

The purpose of this paper is to examine the cross-country variation in innovation and propose that it can be explained by the presence of market institutions using the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the cross-country variation in innovation and propose that it can be explained by the presence of market institutions using the Global Innovation Index.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses ordinary least squares with region and OECD fixed effects to test whether more economic freedom is associated with more innovation.

Findings

The findings reveal that the effect of market institutions on innovation is promoted by both knowledge and creativity. When innovation is broken down into its component measures, the results suggest that a high-quality legal system is associated with more creativity and free trade is associated with greater knowledge.

Originality/value

These findings provide evidence that economic freedom matters for innovation through both creativity and knowledge, particularly through the protection of property rights and the legal system and free trade. Policy makers desiring to spur innovation may want to examine the level of freedom in private ownership and the reduction of trade barriers as a prerequisite for innovation policy.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Christopher John Boudreaux, Gokhan Karahan and Morris Coats

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the institutional background and the incentive for FIFA executives to engage in corrupt activities. The authors also highlight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the institutional background and the incentive for FIFA executives to engage in corrupt activities. The authors also highlight recent FIFA scandals and discuss approaches that may affect FIFA’s corruption in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors approach this subject through a historical narrative. The authors review the literature on corruption and apply these findings to the FIFA organization. Due to many similarities, the authors are able to juxtapose the successes and failures of the Olympics, and apply these findings to FIFA.

Findings

Based on the examination, the authors find that FIFA’s corruption can be mitigated, but it is a very difficult task to accomplish. The US Department of Justice has helped to jump start a corruption reform in FIFA. This has also facilitated the activities of the FIFA ethics committee. However, only time will tell whether these changes will be meaningful and last.

Originality/value

The contribution is that the authors closely link the sports management and economics literature on corruption using FIFA as the subject of analysis. Because of the recent FIFA scandal, the authors are able to update the corruption literature as it applies to this organization and, more generally, in sports.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Bhavneet Walia and Christopher John Boudreaux

Most literature studies have focused on direct treatment costs of injuries. This literature is extended to include the foregone playing time of players as an additional…

Abstract

Purpose

Most literature studies have focused on direct treatment costs of injuries. This literature is extended to include the foregone playing time of players as an additional injury cost.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have reviewed the literature on the cost of players’ injuries to professional sports leagues and other organizations.

Findings

The authors concluded that players’ injury costs are substantial and sufficiently variable to be a primary source of financial uncertainty for a team.

Originality/value

This study's value has added risk pooling and league-wide revenue sharing as tools to mitigate the risk of injury costs. Previous literature reviews focused predominately on direct treatment costs.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Bhavneet Walia and Christopher John Boudreaux

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on hospital mergers and acquisitions (M&As).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on hospital mergers and acquisitions (M&As).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a systematic review of the literature on hospital M&As to summarize their effects upon cost of health care delivery (access), efficiency, market power, cost and price. Implications for health care industry policy are provided.

Findings

A significant majority of results conclude lower costs, increased efficiency, but higher prices (due to a market concentration effect) following hospital merger or acquisition. These results are consistent with industrial organization theory and suggest that regulatory policy (e.g. price cap regulation) will raise allocative efficiency, consumer surplus and overall market surplus within markets for hospital services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to review the price, cost and efficiency effects of M&As with respect to industrial organization theory in the context of hospitals. This study also provides regulatory policy implications.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 45 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

JOHN W. BOUDREAU

The field of human resource management faces a significant dilemma. While emerging evidence, theory, and practical demands are increasing the visibility and credibility of…

Abstract

The field of human resource management faces a significant dilemma. While emerging evidence, theory, and practical demands are increasing the visibility and credibility of human capital as a key to organisational success, the measures used to articulate the impact of human resource management decisions remain misunderstood, unwanted by key constituents, or even counter‐productive. This article proposes that the key to creating meaningful HR metrics is to embed them within a model that shows the links between HR investments and organisational success. The PeopleVantage model is proposed as a framework, the application of the model is illustrated, and the potential of the model for guiding research and practical advances in effective HR measures is discussed.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2003

Kibok Baik is a professor of management at the College of Business and Economics, and Head of Strategic Leadership Center, Kookmin University, Seoul, Korea. He earned his…

Abstract

Kibok Baik is a professor of management at the College of Business and Economics, and Head of Strategic Leadership Center, Kookmin University, Seoul, Korea. He earned his Ph.D. in organizational behavior from the University of Houston. His research interests focus on leadership, cross-cultural issues, and human resource development in multinational corporations. He currently advises dozens of firms in Korea.John W. Boudreau, Ph.D., Professor of human resource studies at Cornell University is recognized worldwide for breakthrough research on the bridge between superior human capital, talent and sustainable competitive advantage. His research has received the Academy of Management’s Organizational Behavior New Concept and Human Resource Scholarly Contribution awards. He consults and conducts executive development with companies worldwide and has published more than 40 books and articles, including the best-selling Human Resource Management (Irwin, 1997), now in its eighth edition in multiple languages worldwide. In addition to HR metrics, Dr. Boudreau’s large-scale research studies and highly focused qualitative research have addressed decision-based HR, executive mobility, HR information systems and organizational staffing and development. Winner of the General Mills Award for teaching innovations, Dr. Boudreau also founded the Central Europe Human Resource Education Initiative, and directed the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS).Janet L. Bryant is a doctoral student in the Ph.D. program in industrial and organizational psychology at Old Dominion University. Her research interests include leadership, virtual work and cross-cultural issues. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.Maxine Dalton is an industrial/organizational psychologist who received her education at the University of South Florida. Her research interests include adult learning and executive development. Her current research is on leadership and social identity conflict in organizations. She has published numerous book chapters, articles and a recent book on global leadership.Donald D. Davis received his Ph.D. in psychology from Michigan State University in 1982, where he also served as assistant director of the Center for Evaluation and Assessment. He has been a professor of organizational psychology at Old Dominion University since that time. He served for seven years as director of the Ph.D. Program in Industrial and Organizational Psychology and has served as a member of the board of directors of the Institute for Asian Studies since its creation in 1989. He has been awarded two Fulbrights – Asian Scholar in Residence (with Zhong-ming Wang, Hangzhou University – now Zhejiang University – Hangzhou, China) and Senior Scholar (Wuhan University, Wuhan, China). He has also held a visiting appointment at the University of Virginia. His research interests include virtual organizations, organization change, technological innovation, cross-cultural organization and management practices, and Chinese organizations. He has published one book and a number of papers on these topics.Jennifer J. Deal is a Research Scientist at the Center for Creative Leadership in San Diego, California, concentrating on global leadership and managing the Emerging Leaders project, which focuses on generational issues in the workplace. She has published a number of articles on topics including generational issues in the workplace, working globally, executive selection, and women in management, and a recent book on global leadership. She holds a B.A. from Haverford College, and a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from The Ohio State University.Daniel Denison is Professor of Management & Organization at the International Institute for Management Development (IMD) in Lausanne, Switzerland and is the Founder of Denison Consulting in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. He is former Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He is the author of Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness (1990) and a number of articles on the link between culture and business performance. His survey assessments of culture, teams, and leaders are widely used by many organizations around the world. His website, www.denisonculture.com has extensive information on his work.Joseph John DiStefano is Professor of Organizational Behavior and International Business at IMD International Institute for Management Development (Lausanne, Switzerland) and Professor Emeritus of the Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of Western Ontario (London, Canada). He was educated at R.P.I., Harvard Business School and Cornell University and has been active as a teacher, researcher and consultant on issues of cross-cultural effectiveness since the early 1970s.Peter J. Dowling (Ph.D., The Flinders University of South Australia) is Pro Vice-Chancellor and Professor of International Management & Strategy in the Division of Business, Law & Information Sciences, University of Canberra. Previous appointments include Foundation Professor of Management at the University of Tasmania, Monash University, the University of Melbourne, and California State University-Chico. He has also held visiting appointments at Cornell University, Michigan State University, the University of Paderborn (Germany) and the University of Bayreuth (Germany). His current research and teaching interests are concerned with International HRM and Strategic Management. His co-authored text International Human Resource Management: Managing People in a Multinational Context, published by South-West, is now in a third edition. He is a former national Vice-President of the Australian Human Resources Institute, past Editor of Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources (1987–1996), and a Life Fellow of the Australian Human Resources Institute.Chris Ernst is a Research Associate at the Center for Creative Leadership with an international background, and a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from North Carolina State University. His work centers on advancing the capacity for leadership in a diverse and globally interconnected world.Ping Ping Fu is an assistant professor of management at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests are mainly in leadership and cross-cultural areas. She was the coordinator for the Chinese part for the Global Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness (GLOBE), and is now leading the CEO study in China. She has published in Journal of Organizational Behavior, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Journal of International Applied Psychology and Leadership Quarterly.Paulo Goelzer is President of the IGA Institute, an educational foundation providing training to 40 countries in five languages and oversees their international operations. He began his career in the food industry very early, working in a family food business. He has also worked as a senior consultant for Strategy and Food Package Goods Industry Practice for a German/Brazilian consulting company, a researcher and consultant for the Brazilian Wholesaler Association (ABAD), and as a Marketing Director for a grocery wholesale company.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-866-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

JOHN BOUDREAU

This paper addresses the fact that many companies lack insight into the uses of utility theory in HR. Most utility research has been conducted with a view to developing…

Abstract

This paper addresses the fact that many companies lack insight into the uses of utility theory in HR. Most utility research has been conducted with a view to developing measurement systems rather than measurement effects. Some selected theories of information effects are presented, together with their implications for the application of HR measurement systems. These theories relate to information receivers and goals , HR measurement as decions support as well as decision theory and bias. Special attention is devoted to HR measurements as persuasion , with reference to transmission, receiver and organisation characteristics. Other factors of importance are the selfinterest of senders and the role of “fashion setting” for innovation. One conclusion is that the study of the effects of HR measurements on their receivers provides a fruitful field for empirical research.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Wayne Cascio and John Boudreau

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that in the arena of human capital, risk-mitigation may overshadow risk-optimized decisions, and show how a more balanced approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that in the arena of human capital, risk-mitigation may overshadow risk-optimized decisions, and show how a more balanced approach can be achieved by understanding and applying frameworks from behavioral decision theory, as well as framing human capital risk using tools and frameworks that have a long history in other management arenas, such as finance.

Design/methodology/approach

Review risk-optimization frameworks in human resource and general management, distill key connections, suggest ways to enhance risk optimization for human capital, and offer suggestions for future research and practice.

Findings

For human capital, risk-mitigation may overshadow risk-optimization, a balanced approach can be achieved by applying behavioral decision theory and by using frameworks from other management arenas, such as finance.

Practical implications

Organizations must acknowledge and skillfully manage the connections between human capital and competitive strategy in this emerging arena of human capital risk, or they will miss key strategic opportunities.

Originality/value

Attention to human capital risk has largely emphasized minimizing or controlling unwanted outcomes, but the paper proposes that risk-optimization requires balanced attention to risk-taking as well.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Herman A. Theeke

This paper seeks to present the positions and conclusions of scholars to support a proposition that the asset approach to human resource accounting has failed.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present the positions and conclusions of scholars to support a proposition that the asset approach to human resource accounting has failed.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the history of human asset accounting.

Findings

The paper offers an alternative “liability approach” to account for and report human resources.

Originality/value

The paper provides an argument and rationale to demonstrate that a liability paradigm would be compatible with normal accounting and reporting procedures.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

Keywords

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