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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

John Billingsley

An outline is given of a vision guidance project, completed and the product brought to market by the National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, Queensland, and of…

Abstract

An outline is given of a vision guidance project, completed and the product brought to market by the National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, Queensland, and of carrier‐phase GPS methods at an advanced stage of experimentation. These establish an infrastructure for a small autonomous “robot farmhand”.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Stuart McCarthy and John Billingsley

A robust low cost refractometer has been developed together with signal conditioning algorithms to enable sucrose content to be measured during the mechanical harvesting…

Abstract

A robust low cost refractometer has been developed together with signal conditioning algorithms to enable sucrose content to be measured during the mechanical harvesting of the sugar cane plant. This technology will be applied to the harvester process that removes the tops of the cane to assist the harvester operator to cut the cane at the optimum cutting height.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

John Mortimer

To describe how Jaguar Cars in the UK is making use of a robot‐based intelligent adaptive metal inert gas (MIG) welding process incorporating laser diode measurement of…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe how Jaguar Cars in the UK is making use of a robot‐based intelligent adaptive metal inert gas (MIG) welding process incorporating laser diode measurement of the gap in the joint between the aluminium C‐pillars and the aluminium roof structure of its new XK sports car that is being built in the company's plant in Castle Bromwich, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes the sensor technology that is used to guide the robot in order to undertake the MIG welding path.

Findings

The use of MIG welding in this particular application is essential if a perfect surface is to be achieved in a critical area of the car body before the aluminium body shell enters the paint shop. The introduction of MIG welding in this particularly exposed region of the car's body shell has proved to be a challenging experience for a wide range of engineers at jaguar cars in the UK, from manufacturing engineers through to process engineers and metallurgists, and others. The MIG welding of cosmetic aluminium skin panels is the result of considerable research work on the part of Jaguar engineers and the company's suppliers, as well as staff at Warwick University. This work is likely to continue in order to achieve a complete understanding of the entire production process, as well as to reduce cycle times and improve overall product performance, both to the benefit of the manufacturer and the end‐user – the customer.

Practical implications

It is likely that arising out of development work into new MIG welding techniques and processes, new standards will be used throughout the Ford organization, including other companies that form the Premier Automotive Group. Aston Martin, Land Rover Volvo could all benefit from the technologies developed at Jaguar Cars.

Originality/value

This is the first time that Jaguar Cars has used an ABB 2400‐16 robot in conjunction with a laser diode sensor to measure the true position of a seam prior to welding, allowing the robot's path to be optimised for each individual vehicle. This paper provides a unique insight into the development of a root‐based intelligent adaptive MIG welding process to produce a perfectly finished body shell.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Mark Dunn, John Billingsley and David Bell

To describe the prototype macadamia nut yield monitor.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the prototype macadamia nut yield monitor.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the machine vision‐based yield monitor for macadamia nut plantations is described. A summary of sensor fusion procedures is presented. Additionally, a summary of current testing progress is provided.

Findings

Using vision to count nuts has the potential to revolutionise yield monitoring for the macadamia industry. Additionally, using a vision sensor for in‐field location can provide a low cost, highly accurate method of positioning. Tractor (and nut) location can be determined accurate to 12 mm.

Practical implications

This project has culminated in the creation of a working prototype harvester. A commercial unit is in the design stage for operation in 2007 harvest season.

Originality/value

This paper describes the solution to a particular problem in the macadamia industry, with potential use in wider fields.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Content available
156

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

John Billingsley

236

Abstract

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

John Billingsley

1183

Abstract

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

John Billingsley

254

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

John Billingsley and Mark Dunn

The paper draws together a range of somewhat unusual machine vision applications, with an integrating overview.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper draws together a range of somewhat unusual machine vision applications, with an integrating overview.

Design/methodology/approach

The National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture is amassing a portfolio of projects involving machine vision. These include identification of animal species, visual counting of macadamia nuts, analysis of animal behaviour and a number of quality control functions. DirectX tools have been developed and are applicable across a wide range of applications, while theory is extended in several ways.

Findings

Most of the projects are still in progress, but results are reported on the degree of success of a range of methods. Strategies and algorithms are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Vision‐based solutions are applied to a diversity of tasks. There will be a continuing stream of such problems with abundant opportunities for research.

Practical implications

The projects are in essence practical, although they have inspired new methodologies. They are conducted in close collaboration with the industries involved and will be deemed to have failed if the outcome is not put to commercial use.

Originality/value

The paper draws together a portfolio of projects, allowing an analysis to be made of the features that unite and differentiate them. It will be of interest to both researchers and those with instrumentation problems.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

John Billingsley

The intelligent interpretation of simple sensor data enables Micromice to find their way around complex mazes.

Abstract

The intelligent interpretation of simple sensor data enables Micromice to find their way around complex mazes.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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