Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Israel Berger and John A. Cartmill

Although patients and lay people are often more knowledgeable about medical conditions than their predecessors, the dominant culture’s increased involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

Although patients and lay people are often more knowledgeable about medical conditions than their predecessors, the dominant culture’s increased involvement in understanding their health and making treatment decisions does not translate into consistently more informed patients. High health literacy is associated with both improved health outcomes and receiving better quality-of-care. Low health literacy disproportionately affects people from marginalized ethnic and language groups. Regardless of how a particular clinician feels about a patient, malapropisms and mis-attributions may cause patients to appear less intelligent or to have lower perceived health literacy, potentially affecting their healthcare experiences with other clinicians. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the evidence for “up-skilling” patients and uses principles from conversation analysis to demonstrate how malapropisms can be corrected sensitively. Clinician training in skilled communication using the conversation analytic role-play method is also addressed.

Findings

Malapropisms are best corrected through modelling rather than calling attention to the error directly, as this allows the patient to save face. Explanations using drawings and clearly written materials may also be useful.

Originality/value

Helping patients to improve their communication with clinicians may lead to improved health outcomes through improved quality-of-care.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Deborah Cartmill

Discusses the issue of charging for public library services.Implementing a charge for services is viewed against a background ofincreasing demand for services and falling…

Abstract

Discusses the issue of charging for public library services. Implementing a charge for services is viewed against a background of increasing demand for services and falling budgets. Puts forward arguments both for and against charging for services, and discusses the effect which new technology is having on services, and the debate about charging. Also discusses alternative methods for the library service to raise additional income. Concludes that charging for services is not the only option open to the library to raise money.

Details

Library Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

William H. Wiese

A recently published survey found that slightly over 14 million persons age 16 or over hunted in the United States in 1991 and spent over $12 billion on hunting. By…

Abstract

A recently published survey found that slightly over 14 million persons age 16 or over hunted in the United States in 1991 and spent over $12 billion on hunting. By comparison, the same survey determined there are over 35 million anglers. Another source estimates that nearly 18 million participants age seven and older hunted with firearms in 1992. That ranks hunting well below the participatory sports of swimming, bicycling, and bowling in popularity, but ahead of football, skiing, tennis, and target shooting. Estimates vary, and while these numbers are substantial, they indicate that hunters comprise well under ten percent of the total U.S. population. Hunters have come under increasing fire from animal rightists and others who claim the sport is cruel and unnecessary. Hundreds of articles and a number of books have been written in recent years on both sides of the issue, or, more accurately, all sides. Many writers as well as the population at large see hunting as not entirely “good” or “bad” but some of each, depending upon the context.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Hartwig Pautz

The aim of this paper is to discuss the literature on income generation methods in the context of the “public library ethos”. As public libraries are struggling with cuts…

1290

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss the literature on income generation methods in the context of the “public library ethos”. As public libraries are struggling with cuts to public spending almost everywhere, the topic of “income generation” to supplement public funding is highly relevant.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is a review of existing literature about income generation methods and public library ethos.

Findings

The literature review reports on a large variety of income generation methods – some of them are country-specific and only applicable in particular political, legal and cultural environments, others could be applied by librarians across borders. The review makes clear that income generation is difficult and requires skill. It also clearly outlines the potential incompatibilities between some income generation methods and the public library ethos.

Practical implications

The article raises important issues with regards to how practitioners should go about funding existing or new services. It becomes clear that librarians need a clear ethical position regarding how services can be provided and under which conditions services cannot be provided on the basis of principled reasoning.

Originality/value

A broad range of literature on income generation and public library ethos from various countries is reviewed and questions regarding how public librarians, on a practical level, can improve their institutions’ funding situation are discussed. This praxis-oriented discussion is connected to important ethical considerations that should come into play when devising an income generation strategy.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Alexandra Gkliati and Anna Saiti

The purpose of the paper is to examine the levels of job satisfaction among doctors who work in Greek public hospitals, to determine the factors that may influence their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the levels of job satisfaction among doctors who work in Greek public hospitals, to determine the factors that may influence their satisfaction, to examine the contribution that staff support makes to job satisfaction and to investigate the potential impact that an economic recession might have on job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The sampling process used was stratified sampling and it was applied to all health regions in Greece. An official request to carry out the study was sent to 45 hospitals for the approval of their management. Through random sampling, 5% of the doctors' population was selected from each participating hospital, with the resulting sample consisting of 458 doctors from all the health regions of Greece. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to the sample of medical doctors to gather data on their perception of the work they do in public hospitals.

Findings

Empirical results showed that (1) the most important factor in doctors' job satisfaction appears to be the nature of their job and the high levels of autonomy that they have, and (2) doctors' level of commitment is maintained by enhancing their positive emotions and sense of professional well-being.

Originality/value

A deeper understanding of important concepts of an organization's behavior such as job satisfaction, staff support and their connection with internal organizational structures will facilitate policy makers and those who make decisions on the strategic management of medical staff in public hospitals.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Sandra C. Buttigieg, Vincent Cassar and Judy W. Scully

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in…

Abstract

Purpose

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in achieving effective interdisciplinary team working, which is explicitly declared in the mission statement of a 60-bed acute rehabilitative geriatric hospital in Malta.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the above-mentioned key stakeholders.

Findings

Three main distinct yet interdependent themes emerged as a result of thematic analysis: “managing a team-friendly hospital”, “interdisciplinary team components”, and “interdisciplinary team processes”. The findings show that visibility of management support and its alignment with the process and content levels of interdisciplinary teamwork are key to integrated care for acute rehabilitative geriatric patients.

Research limitations/implications

The emerging phenomena may not be reproducible in a different context; although many of the emerging themes could be comfortably matched with the existing literature.

Practical implications

The implications are geared towards raising the consciousness and conscientiousness of good practice in interdisciplinary teamwork in hospitals, as well as in emphasizing organizational and management support as crucial factors for team-based organizations.

Social implications

Interdisciplinary teamwork in acute rehabilitative geriatrics provides optimal quality and integrated health care delivery with the aim that the older persons are successfully discharged back to the community.

Originality/value

The authors draw on solid theoretical frameworks – the complexity theory, team effectiveness model and the social identity theory – to support their major finding, namely the alignment of organizational and management support with intra-team factors at the process and content level.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6