Search results

1 – 10 of 224
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

Johanna Senior and Dilys Wells

Nowadays it is not particularly low‐income families that are obliged to consider economies, most families are involved. At a time when the food products on the supermarket shelves…

Abstract

Nowadays it is not particularly low‐income families that are obliged to consider economies, most families are involved. At a time when the food products on the supermarket shelves have never looked so appealing and the promise of the good life seemed within everyone's grasp, how can one strike a balance and keep the family well fed within one's means? The price rises have covered all types of food but when the same rate of increase is applied to the most expensive items, the protein foods, this is the area where it hurts most. This is where most economies are made and if the wrong economies are made it is the area where most dangers lie nutritionally speaking. At the present time, the main sources of protein in the diet, meat, fish, poultry, cheese, milk and eggs, which together provide about 60 per cent of our total protein intake, are also major sources of other nutrients, too. (This is just as well because on average we spend about two thirds of our total food allowance on these animal protein foods each week.) The average woman's protein requirements would be amply covered if she consumes daily one average serving of either meat, fish or poultry, half a pint of milk, 1 oz of cheese, one egg and three slices of bread. The same quantities of these foods would also give her most of the daily recommended intake of minerals, and B group vitamins, and will supply in addition about one half of the vitamin A and vitamin D she is thought to need daily. On the other hand, taking the country as a whole, we spend one third of our total food allowance on cereal foods, fruit and vegetables, and get for our money almost 40 per cent of our total protein intake, 50 per cent of our iron, more than one third of our calcium and almost all of our vitamin C.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Franklin Becker, William Sims and Johanna H. Schoss

Corporate campuses have been justified on many grounds, including lower operational costs, greater flexibility, stronger corporate branding and enhanced cross‐functional…

Abstract

Corporate campuses have been justified on many grounds, including lower operational costs, greater flexibility, stronger corporate branding and enhanced cross‐functional communication. Despite the tens of millions of dollars spent to acquire and develop them, little research exists that has systematically tested the validity of the benefits attributed to a corporate campus. This paper reports on an initial set of case studies examining one potential benefit of a corporate campus: the nature and extent of communication across organisational units. The results suggest that the amount of cross‐unit communication on a corporate campus may be less than expected. Implications for workplace and collocation strategies are discussed.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Kalle Lind, Anne H. Salonen, Johanna Järvinen-Tassopoulos, Hannu Alho and Sari Castrén

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prevalence of potential problem gambling among Finnish prisoners; the associations between problem gambling and demographics, substance…

1567

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prevalence of potential problem gambling among Finnish prisoners; the associations between problem gambling and demographics, substance use and crime-related factors; and problem gamblers’ support preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

Prisoners (n=96) from two Finnish prisons were recruited between December 2017 and January 2018. The estimated response rate was 31 percent. Gambling problems were measured using the Brief Biosocial Gambling Screen. The participants were asked to report their gambling both for one year prior to their incarceration and for the past year. The independent variables were demographics (age, gender and marital status), substance use (alcohol, smoking and narcotics) and crime-related factors (crime type, prison type and previous sentence). Statistical significance (p) was determined using Fischer’s exact test.

Findings

Past-year pre-conviction problem gambling prevalence was 16.3 percent and past-year prevalence 15 percent. Age, gender, smoking, alcohol or illicit drug use were not associated with past-year problem gambling before sentencing. One-third of the prisoners (33.3 percent) who were sentenced for a property crime, financial crime or robbery were problem gamblers. One-quarter (24 percent) of all participants showed an interest in receiving support by identifying one or more support preferences. The most preferred type of support was group support in its all forms.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that correctional institutions undertake systematic screening for potential problem gambling, and implement tailored intervention programs for inmates with gambling problems.

Originality/value

This study provides a deeper understanding of problem gambling in prisons. Problem gambling is associated with crime and also seems to be linked with serving a previous sentence. Early detection and tailored interventions for problem gambling may help to reduce reoffending rates.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Peter English, Margarietha Johanna de Villiers Scheepers, David Fleischman, Jacqueline Burgess and Gail Crimmins

Responding to increasing external pressure, universities are developing new strategies to illustrate the impact of their degrees on graduate employability. This paper investigates…

4248

Abstract

Purpose

Responding to increasing external pressure, universities are developing new strategies to illustrate the impact of their degrees on graduate employability. This paper investigates how alumni regard the development of their professional networks during their tertiary education in relation to employability and the associated pedagogical implications.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 business and arts alumni from a regional university.

Findings

The findings reveal the importance of developing a professional network by cultivating social capital while at university. Alumni identify all forms of work-integrated learning (WIL), connectedness through social media, the role of university staff and volunteering as concrete ways to develop a professional network and enhance employability.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has pedagogical implications to develop graduate employability and WIL. Universities should draw from alumni networks to help develop students' bridging capital through industry-facing WIL projects. Educators should design assessment tasks in which students develop contacts and networking capabilities with alumni and other professionals using various platforms (e.g. social media). In addition, educators should promote the benefits of voluntary work and invite alumni and other industry stakeholders to co-design and co-teach areas of curriculum.

Originality/value

Drawing from the experiences of alumni re-routes the channel of communication from institutions expressing the importance of professional networks in relation to employability, to credible industry alumni confirming this importance. Few previous studies have taken this “outside-in approach” to emphasise and validate the importance of developing professional networks in relation to employability, particularly at regional universities.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2023

Maria Eidenskog, Ola Leifler, Johanna Sefyrin, Ericka Johnson and Mikael Asplund

The information technology (IT) sector has been seen as central to society's transformation to a more just and sustainable society, which underlines teachers’ responsibility to…

1199

Abstract

Purpose

The information technology (IT) sector has been seen as central to society's transformation to a more just and sustainable society, which underlines teachers’ responsibility to foster engineers who can contribute specifically to such ends. This study aims to report an effort to significantly update an existing engineering programme in IT with this ambition and to analyse the effects and challenges associated with the transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a combination of action-oriented research based on implementing key changes to the curriculum; empirical investigations including surveys and interviews with students and teachers, and analysis of these; and a science and technology studies-inspired analysis.

Findings

Respondents were generally positive towards adding topics relating to sustainability. However, in the unmaking of traditional engineering subjects, changes created a conflict between core versus soft subjects in which the core subjects tended to gain the upper hand. This conflict can be turned into productive discussions by focusing on what kinds of engineers the authors’ educate and how students can be introduced to societal problems as an integrated part of their education.

Practical implications

This study can be helpful for educators in the engineering domain to support them in their efforts to transition from a (narrow) focus on traditional disciplines to one where the bettering of society is at the core.

Originality/value

This study provides a novel approach to the transformation of engineering education through a theoretical analysis seldom used in studies of higher education on a novel case study.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2018

Per-Olof Bjuggren, Louise Nordström and Johanna Palmberg

The aim of this study is to investigate whether female leaders are more efficient in family firms than in non-family firms.

2037

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate whether female leaders are more efficient in family firms than in non-family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a unique database of ownership and leadership in private Swedish firms that makes it possible to analyze differences in firm performance due to female leadership in family and non-family firms. The analysis is based on survey data merged with micro-level data on Swedish firms. Only firms with five or more employees are included in the analysis. The sample contains more than 1,000 firms.

Findings

The descriptive statistics show that there are many more male than female corporate leaders. However, the regression analysis indicates that female leadership has a much more positive impact on the performance of family firms than on that for non-family firms, where the effect is ambiguous.

Originality/value

Comparative studies examining the impact of female leadership on firm-level performance in family and non-family firms are rare, and those that exist are most often either qualitative or focused on large, listed firms. By investigating the role of female directors in family and non-family firms, the study adds to the literature on management, corporate governance and family firms.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Ralf Josef Johanna Beerens and Karin Haverhoek-Mieremet

This paper seeks to overcome the mismatch between evaluation reports and the expectations of the target audience, by identifying crisis management professionals' expectations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to overcome the mismatch between evaluation reports and the expectations of the target audience, by identifying crisis management professionals' expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted stakeholder information analysis was used to survey the expectations of 84 crisis management professionals in the Netherlands. A general inductive analysis was applied to qualitative data, from which five main themes emerged: purpose; object or focus; reasoning and (meta) analysis; result or conclusion, and the overall design of the evaluation.

Findings

Currently, evaluation reports are seen merely as a way to share experience and support thinking about how to avoid repeating mistakes. However, most respondents expected them to contribute to learning and support improvement. They should provide actionable feedback on what could be done differently or better, and indicate how this can be achieved. Respondents emphasised the need to focus on the human factor and not neglect the context. The wide variety of views underlined that it is difficult to create one evaluation product that meets all expectations.

Research limitations/implications

Although some major themes clearly emerged from the data, it is unclear how they relate to each other, and their relative importance. In addition, no distinction is made between evaluations of real events and simulations.

Practical implications

Users should be encouraged to provide input into the evaluation process by clarifying their needs and how they use evaluation reports.

Originality/value

This research is the first attempt to identify user expectations regarding what constitutes an effective evaluation.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Antoinette Pavithra, Russell Mannion, Neroli Sunderland and Johanna Westbrook

The study aimed to understand the significance of how employee personhood and the act of speaking up is shaped by factors such as employees' professional status, length of…

1429

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to understand the significance of how employee personhood and the act of speaking up is shaped by factors such as employees' professional status, length of employment within their hospital sites, age, gender and their ongoing exposure to unprofessional behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses to a survey by 4,851 staff across seven sites within a hospital network in Australia were analysed to interrogate whether speaking up by hospital employees is influenced by employees' symbolic capital and situated subjecthood (SS). The authors utilised a Bourdieusian lens to interrogate the relationship between the symbolic capital afforded to employees as a function of their professional, personal and psycho-social resources and their self-reported capacity to speak up.

Findings

The findings indicate that employee speaking up behaviours appear to be influenced profoundly by whether they feel empowered or disempowered by ongoing and pre-existing personal and interpersonal factors such as their functional roles, work-based peer and supervisory support and ongoing exposure to discriminatory behaviours.

Originality/value

The findings from this interdisciplinary study provide empirical insights around why culture change interventions within healthcare organisations may be successful in certain contexts for certain staff groups and fail within others.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Johanna Anzengruber, Martin A. Goetz, Herbert Nold and Marco Woelfle

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the relative importance of task, relations, and change capabilities of managers at low, middle, and top hierarchical levels.

2631

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the relative importance of task, relations, and change capabilities of managers at low, middle, and top hierarchical levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from performance reviews and evaluations from human resources personnel for 2,307 managers in one large company in a high-tech industry. Separate regressions for each management level were performed with standardized regression coefficients allowing comparisons across the different regressions.

Findings

Significant differences were observed in the effectiveness of managers using task, relations, and change capabilities. At top management, change-oriented capabilities become 2 to 3 times more important than at the lowest level. Task-oriented capabilities become significantly less important at the top level. Relations-oriented capabilities are important at all levels.

Research limitations/implications

Studies with participants from multiple industries and longitudinal studies could benefit research by further validating the findings and offering new insights on other situational factors, which change over time.

Practical implications

Managers, who have been successful in lower and middle positions, may not necessarily be effective top managers.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored differences in managerial capabilities at different hierarchical levels in organizations. The study offers a clear rationale to consider when conducting any analysis of different levels of management by practitioners or researchers.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Remmer Sassen, Dominik Dienes and Johanna Wedemeier

This study aims to focus on the following research question: Which institutional characteristics are associated with sustainability reporting by UK higher education institutions?

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the following research question: Which institutional characteristics are associated with sustainability reporting by UK higher education institutions?

Design/methodology/approach

To answer the aforementioned research question, this study uses logistic regression.

Findings

The results show that 17 per cent of the UK higher education institutions report on their sustainability (July 2014). In line with legitimacy and stakeholder theory, logistic regressions provide evidence that the larger the size of the institution, the higher the probability of reporting. By contrast, high public funding decreases this probability.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show characteristics of higher education institutions that support or hamper sustainability reporting. Overall, the findings imply a lack of institutionalisation of sustainability reporting among higher education institutions.

Originality/value

Although a lot of research has been done on corporate sustainability reporting, only a small number of studies have addressed the issues of sustainability reporting of higher education institutions. This study covers all sustainability reports disclosed among the 160 UK higher education institutions. It is the first study that investigates characteristics of higher education institutions that disclose a sustainability report.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

1 – 10 of 224