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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Johanna Holm, Satu Lähteenmäki, Hannu Salmela, Reima Suomi, Arto Suominen and Maarit Viljanen

This paper describes a project which investigates the human resource management practices that are being used in managing information professionals in ICT companies or ICT…

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2859

Abstract

This paper describes a project which investigates the human resource management practices that are being used in managing information professionals in ICT companies or ICT departments. The effectiveness of the practices is evaluated from individual and management perspectives. It is assumed that the nature of the contract between the IS professional and the organization influences the effectiveness of different practices. Thus, the notion of “best practice” is seen as context dependent. When writing the paper, the research was still in progress and no results can yet be given. After completing the study, practitioners can use the results to compare their own practices with those that were found to be effective in the nine case organizations. For researchers, the results will provide hypotheses about the relationship between HRM practices and job satisfaction of the IS professionals.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Remmer Sassen, Dominik Dienes and Johanna Wedemeier

This study aims to focus on the following research question: Which institutional characteristics are associated with sustainability reporting by UK higher education institutions?

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the following research question: Which institutional characteristics are associated with sustainability reporting by UK higher education institutions?

Design/methodology/approach

To answer the aforementioned research question, this study uses logistic regression.

Findings

The results show that 17 per cent of the UK higher education institutions report on their sustainability (July 2014). In line with legitimacy and stakeholder theory, logistic regressions provide evidence that the larger the size of the institution, the higher the probability of reporting. By contrast, high public funding decreases this probability.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show characteristics of higher education institutions that support or hamper sustainability reporting. Overall, the findings imply a lack of institutionalisation of sustainability reporting among higher education institutions.

Originality/value

Although a lot of research has been done on corporate sustainability reporting, only a small number of studies have addressed the issues of sustainability reporting of higher education institutions. This study covers all sustainability reports disclosed among the 160 UK higher education institutions. It is the first study that investigates characteristics of higher education institutions that disclose a sustainability report.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Sören Kock, Johanna Nisuls and Anette Söderqvist

The purpose of this paper is to study international opportunities gained through co‐opetitive relations in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) as well as to examine…

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1675

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study international opportunities gained through co‐opetitive relations in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) as well as to examine the influence of different levels of co‐opetition on international opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve the purpose, multiple in‐depth case studies are conducted in four SMEs.

Findings

The results reveal a paradigm shift in competition in an international context. Co‐opetition has provided international opportunities for the case companies, though to varying degrees and character. Furthermore, international opportunities can be found in strong and weak cooperation‐dominated relations as well as in equal relations between competitors. However, the different levels of co‐opetition influence the characteristics of the international opportunities in terms of continuity and scope.

Research limitations/implications

The results highlight the importance of taking co‐opetitive relations in general as well as the different levels of co‐opetition within these relations into consideration when analyzing the exploration and exploitation of international opportunities in SMEs. The results are, however, limited by the number of cases analyzed and further research on a larger scale is needed in order to draw additional conclusions.

Practical implications

The influence of various co‐opetitive relations found on international opportunities and competitiveness brings to light the value for companies to focus on and to develop these relations as well as to maintain a variety of cooperative relations with their competitors in the internationalization process.

Originality/value

The paper increases the knowledge on a yet largely unexplored, but significant topic, which is valuable both from a practical‐ and a research‐oriented perspective.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

FREDERICK P. FRANK and MURIEL MACKETT‐FRANK

This work examines implications for educational administration of the International Association for the evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) surveys. Major…

Abstract

This work examines implications for educational administration of the International Association for the evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) surveys. Major implications discussed include productiveness of both international comparison and international measures of educational achievement. Implications are also discussed in terms of viability of the application of large scale sample survey data to decision making within individual countries. Issues generated by the IEA studies are presented including: (1) cultural relevance of test items; (2) ethnocentrism of test makers; (3) contributions to comparative analysis; (4) cost effectiveness and feasibility; (5) potential descriptive value to individual nations; (6) data interpretation; (7) relating data to micro policy issues; (8) and potential for redefining concepts of educational achievement. It is concluded that the work of educational administration must proceed with awareness of the hazards and blessings of cross‐sectional research for training, practice, and new research.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2009

Jorma Larimo and Tiia Vissak

This volume of Progress in International Business Research comprises of a selection of 12 competitive papers from the 34th EIBA (European International Business Academy…

Abstract

This volume of Progress in International Business Research comprises of a selection of 12 competitive papers from the 34th EIBA (European International Business Academy) annual conference, which was held in Tallinn, Estonia in December 2008 with the theme “International Business and the Catching-up Economies: Challenges and Opportunities”. It addresses two main issues – (1) the internationalization process and (2) the role of knowledge and innovation for internationalization – that are important in the current economic slowdown both for catching-up and for other economies, scholars, and practitioners.

Details

Research on Knowledge, Innovation and Internationalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-956-1

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Johanna Vuori

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Finnish higher education institutions communicate market differentiation on the admissions webpages of their international…

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1285

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Finnish higher education institutions communicate market differentiation on the admissions webpages of their international business and technology programmes when attempting to appeal to prospective students and distinguish themselves from other institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included admissions webpages of 68 bachelor’s and master’s programmes representing both Finnish universities and universities of applied sciences. The analysis method was a qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The international programmes heavily accentuated their labour market relevance in their advertising and generated strong claims regarding the future career prospects of the graduates. In addition, the programmes emphasised their pedagogical methods and international atmosphere. References to non-academic life were not observed.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis was only based on text and included two study fields.

Practical implications

The results of this study can be used by marketers to critically examine their own marketing differentiation efforts and promises made to students.

Social implications

Finnish business and technology programmes send an unequivocal marketing message that education has an instrumental value and students are considered consumers of education.

Originality/value

This study is the first comprehensive study of the marketing communication practices of international higher education programmes in Finland. Moreover, this study contributes to the study of global international market mechanisms and research on marketing communication practised by higher education institutions.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Marijke Paula Margaretha Vester, Greetje Johanna de Grooth, Tobias Nicolaas Bonten, Bas Leendert van der Hoeven, Marieke Susanne de Doelder, Danielle Catharina Eindhoven, Linda Wilhelmina Barbier, Jessica Coppens, Martin Jan Schalij and Paul Ronald Maria van Dijkman

Integrated care models have shown to deliver efficient healthcare, but implementation has proven to be difficult. The Support Consultation is an integrated care model…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated care models have shown to deliver efficient healthcare, but implementation has proven to be difficult. The Support Consultation is an integrated care model, which enables full integration by bundled payment, insurer involvement, predefined care pathways and strengthening of primary care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an indication of the improvements in healthcare delivery after implementation of this proposed model and to create a base for extension to similar interfaces between primary and secondary care.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective study was used to compare the effect on the number of referred patients with non-acute cardiac complaints and the cost effectiveness before and after implementation of the Support Consultation. Patients who previously would have been referred to the cardiologist were now discussed between general practitioner and cardiologist in a primary care setting.

Findings

The first consecutive 100 patients (age 55±16 years, male 48 percent), discussed in the Support Consultation, were analyzed. Implementation of the Support Consultation resulted in a net costs (program costs and referral costs) reduction of 61 percent compared with usual care. All involved parties were positive about the program.

Research limitations/implications

The Support Consultation has the ability to provide more effective healthcare delivery and to reduce net costs. The setting of the current study can be used as example for other specialties in countries with a similar healthcare system.

Originality/value

This study provides the potential cost savings after implementation of an integrated care model, based on real-life data.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Jenny Rendahl, Peter Korp, Marianne Pipping Ekström and Christina Berg

The purpose of this paper is to explore and elucidate adolescents’ reasoning about risks related to food and eating.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and elucidate adolescents’ reasoning about risks related to food and eating.

Design/methodology/approach

Boys and girls aged 15-16 years participated in a focus group interview with role-playing as a stimulus for discussion and reflection. In all, 31 participants took part, divided into five groups. In the role-playing, the participants portrayed agents who they perceived to give messages about food. In the focus group they discussed their experience of carrying out the role-play, and how they usually cope with conflicting messages, preferences and needs regarding food and eating.

Findings

The findings suggested that there were two main themes of risk profiling related to eating. One concerned bodily risk related to the food ingested and included concerns both about not reaching health and performance due to the unfavourable intake of calories, nutrients, additives, bacteria, viruses and parasites, and threats to immediate well-being following consumption. The second main category concerned the risk of being conspicuous, or “sticking out”, which incorporated food-based gender norms and norms related to table manners. In practice, the risk of not displaying an appropriate image of themselves through their food and eating choices was more prominent than risk perceptions related to impacts of food choices on well-being and performance. Difficulties in classifying foods as “good” or “bad” enhanced their uncertainty.

Originality/value

The results suggest that health-promotion activities for young people should focus not only on how to feed their bodies but also on how to avoid feeding their anxieties.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Hannele Kauppinen‐Räisänen, Johanna Gummerus and Katariina Lehtola

The purpose of this paper is to explore remembered positive eating and food experiences, aiming to gain an understanding of the nature of these past experiences.

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1979

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore remembered positive eating and food experiences, aiming to gain an understanding of the nature of these past experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Positive food‐related experiences were gathered through focus group interviews. These experiences were inductively categorised into recurring themes and dimensions within the themes.

Findings

An analysis of the qualitative data led to the recognition of several themes involving eating that were related to childhood memories, eating related to tourist experiences, as well as memories of commensal eating and homemade food. The experiences were drawn together into dimensions to provide deeper comprehension of the observed themes. As a result, the study suggests that remembered eating and food experiences are characterised by the self, place, food, context and time.

Practical implications

The study provides knowledge on what constitutes memorable positive and pleasurable food‐related experiences, which the consumer may even want to relive. Hence, the study helps managers understand the significance of providing food‐related experiences that become memorable.

Originality/value

The context was not predetermined to a particular eating setting, which resulted in a multidimensional framework of remembered experiences with several implications. The approach provided new insights into understanding the effects of positive and pleasurable food‐related experiences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Hanna Silvola and Eija Vinnari

The purpose of this paper is to enrich extant understanding of the role of both agency and context in the uptake of sustainability assurance. To this end, the authors…

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1930

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enrich extant understanding of the role of both agency and context in the uptake of sustainability assurance. To this end, the authors examine auditors' attempts to promote sustainability assurance and establish it as a practice requiring the professional involvement of auditors.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying institutional work (Lawrence and Suddaby, 2006) and institutional logics (Thornton, 2002; Thornton et al., 2012) as the method theories, the authors examine interview data and a variety of documentary evidence collected in Finland, a small society characterized by social and environmental values, beliefs in functioning institutions and public trust in companies behaving responsibly.

Findings

With this study, the authors make two main contributions to extant literature. First, the authors illustrate the limits that society-level logics related to corporate social responsibility, together with the undermining or rejected institutional work of other agents, place especially on the political and cultural work undertaken by auditors. Second, the study responds to Power's (2003) call for country-specific studies by exploring a rather unique context, Finland, where societal trust in companies is arguably stronger than in many other countries and this trust appears to affect how actors perceive the need for sustainability assurance.

Originality/value

This is one of the few accounting studies that combines institutional logics and institutional work to study the uptake of a management fashion, in this case sustainability assurance.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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