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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Johanna Gummerus, Michaela Lipkin, Apramey Dube and Kristina Heinonen

This study aims to introduce and characterize a specific form of self-service technology (SST), customer self-service devices (SSDs), as well as propose and apply a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to introduce and characterize a specific form of self-service technology (SST), customer self-service devices (SSDs), as well as propose and apply a classification scheme of SSDs to encourage future research on such SSTs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on conceptual development of customer SSDs and exploratory qualitative insight from representatives of companies offering various types of SSDs.

Findings

This paper introduces SSDs as customer-possessed and controlled smart service devices aiming to solve problems from the customer’s perspective, often within completely new, customer-defined service processes and ecosystems. SSDs are not confined to the company-controlled service environment, and customers may thus use them wherever and whenever they so wish. The study characterizes SSDs based on service and customer use features, as well as on the subject of the service act (self/other vs belongings) and nature of service act (monitoring vs acting).

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to conceptual exploration with qualitative insights from six companies. Future research is needed to empirically study different SSDs by using both qualitative and quantitative approaches in various settings.

Originality/value

The paper conceptualizes SSDs as an extension to the traditional SST framework. It contributes to the understanding of how personal handheld devices can contribute to customer experiences. It provides research directions to stimulate further research in SSTs.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Hannele Kauppinen-Räisänen, Johanna Gummerus, Catharina von Koskull and Helene Cristini

The purpose of this study was to explore what luxury represents to contemporary consumers in their own life contexts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore what luxury represents to contemporary consumers in their own life contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods qualitative approach was adopted that comprised individual, personal interviews and focused interviews with small groups.

Findings

The study contributes to the field of luxury research by highlighting consumers’ interpretations of luxury as highly subjective, relative and contextual; showing that according to consumers, luxury relates to both consumption and non-consumption contexts; illustrating the value of luxury as a multidimensional construct in both contexts; and demonstrating how luxury may relate to a consumer’s desire to be meaningful and genuine, thereby generating prudential value. In these cases, luxury is closely linked to consumers’ perceptions of meaningfulness and well-being.

Practical implications

For marketing managers, the findings suggest that the wave of new luxury – seeking meaningfulness – may serve as a novel means of branding.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that the significance of the concept of luxury transcends commercial settings and offerings, i.e. the brand, product or service. The findings show that luxury may also be generated in non-commercial contexts and specific activities (e.g. running, gardening). Based on these findings, it is proposed that luxury in non-commercial settings is characteristic of the new wave of luxury, and that in such settings, luxury may contribute to personal well-being, thereby generating prudential value.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Johanna Gummerus, Catharina von Koskull and Christian Kowalkowski

In a time when relationships have been recognized as an integral part of contemporary marketing theory and practice, what role can the sub-discipline of relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

In a time when relationships have been recognized as an integral part of contemporary marketing theory and practice, what role can the sub-discipline of relationship marketing play? The aim with this special issue is to critically assess the state of relationship marketing and call for new ideas to take the field forward.

Design/methodology/approach

The editors had an open call for papers with an original perspective and advanced thinking on relationship marketing, resulting in 50 originally submitted manuscripts that were subjected to double-blind review. Of these, this issue presents five articles. In addition, the editors invited well-renowned thought leaders who have contributed to theory development within relationship marketing. This issue starts with their four thoughtful, forward-orientated contributions.

Findings

Several thought-provoking reflections and research findings are presented that urge relationship marketing researchers to explore novel avenues for the future of this area. A prominent way forward may be looking for a common ground in relationship marketing thinking, assessing the extent to which the different literature streams add to marketing research and when they do not and testing/deploying the learnings in new settings.

Research limitations/implications

The special issue does not address all areas of relationship marketing research. Potential areas for future relationship marketing research are identified.

Originality/value

To assess existent knowledge of relationship marketing is needed to take the field forward.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Suvi Nenonen, Johanna Gummerus and Alexey Sklyar

Service-dominant logic acknowledges that actors can influence how service ecosystems evolve through institutional work, but empirical research is only nascent. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Service-dominant logic acknowledges that actors can influence how service ecosystems evolve through institutional work, but empirical research is only nascent. This paper advances understanding of ecosystem change by proposing that dynamic capabilities are a special type of operant resources enabling actors to conduct institutional work. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to explore which dynamic capabilities are associated with proactively influencing service ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on service-dominant logic, institutional work and dynamic capabilities, this exploratory study assumes an actor-centric perspective and proposes a conceptual model with a hierarchy of dynamic capabilities as the antecedents for successfully influencing service ecosystems. The research model was tested with survey data using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

Among the dynamic capabilities studied, “visioning” and “influencing explicit institutions” directly affect “success in influencing service ecosystems,” whereas “timing” does so indirectly through “influencing explicit institutions.” The other dynamic capabilities studied have no significant effect on “success in influencing service ecosystems.” “Success in influencing service ecosystems” positively affects the “increased service ecosystem size and efficiency.”

Practical implications

In addition to reactively positioning and competing at the marketplace, firms can choose to proactively influence their service ecosystems’ size and efficiency. Firms aiming to influence service ecosystems should particularly develop dynamic capabilities related to visioning, timing and influencing explicit institutions.

Originality/value

This research is the first service-dominant logic investigation of the linkage between the actors’ dynamic capabilities and their ability to influence service ecosystems.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Johanna Gummerus, Jacob Mickelsson, Jakob Trischler, Tuomas Härkönen and Christian Grönroos

This paper aims to develop and apply a service design method that allows for stronger recognition and integration of human activities into the front-end stages of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and apply a service design method that allows for stronger recognition and integration of human activities into the front-end stages of the service design process.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a discussion of different service design perspectives and activity theory, the paper develops a method called activity-set mapping (ActS). ActS is applied to an exploratory service design project to demonstrate its use.

Findings

Three broad perspectives on service design are suggested: (1) the dyadic interaction, (2) the systemic interaction and (3) the customer activity perspectives. The ActS method draws on the latter perspective and focuses on the study of human activity sets. The application of ActS shows that the method can help identify and visualize sets of activities.

Research limitations/implications

The ActS method opens new avenues for service design by zooming in on the micro level and capturing the set of activities linked to a desired goal achievement. However, the method is limited to activities reported by research participants and may exclude unconscious activities. Further research is needed to validate and refine the method.

Practical implications

The ActS method will help service designers explore activities in which humans engage to achieve a desired goal/end state.

Originality/value

The concept of “human activity set” is new to service research and opens analytical opportunities for service design. The ActS method contributes a visualization tool for identifying activity sets and uncovering the benefits, sacrifices and frequency of activities.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Johanna Gummerus, Veronica Liljander, Emil Weman and Minna Pihlström

Customer engagement is a concept that has emerged recently to capture customers' total set of behavioral activities toward a firm. The purpose of this paper is to study…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer engagement is a concept that has emerged recently to capture customers' total set of behavioral activities toward a firm. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of customer engagement behaviors on perceived relationship benefits and relationship outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of members of a gaming Facebook brand community, resulting in 276 usable responses from gaming customers.

Findings

Customer engagement was divided into “Community Engagement Behaviors” (CEB) and “Transactional Engagement Behaviors” (TEB). In addition, three relationship benefits were identified: social benefits, entertainment benefits and economic benefits. The engagement behaviors largely influenced the benefits received. Furthermore, the mediation analysis results show that the influence of CEB on satisfaction is partially mediated by social benefits and entertainment benefits, while the effect of TEB on satisfaction is fully mediated through the same benefits. The effect of CEB on loyalty is mediated through entertainment benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to one brand community. The findings have implications for further research on customer engagement.

Practical implications

The paper's findings give ideas about how firms can utilize Facebook communities to enhance satisfaction and loyalty by offering the right kinds of relationship benefits. Managers are encouraged to study customer engagement behaviors on, and perceptions of, all channels and to utilize this information for the development of their social media strategies.

Originality/value

Customer engagement is a newly introduced concept on which scarce empirical research exists, and there is very little evidence of its effect on customer relationships. This is the first paper to study customer engagement empirically on a Facebook brand community, and to relate customer engagement to relationship constructs.

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Christian Grönroos and Johanna Gummerus

– The purpose of this conceptual paper is to analyse the implications generated by a service perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to analyse the implications generated by a service perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis of two approaches to understanding service perspectives, service logic (SL) and service-dominant logic (SDL), reveals direct and indirect marketing implications.

Findings

The SDL is based on a metaphorical view of co-creation and value co-creation, in which the firm, customers and other actors participate in the process that leads to value for customers. The approach is firm-driven; the service provider drives value creation. The managerial implications are not service perspective-based, and co-creation may be imprisoned by its metaphor. In contrast, SL takes an analytical approach, with co-creation concepts that can significantly reinvent marketing from a service perspective. Value gets created in customer processes, and value creation is customer driven. Ten managerial SL principles derived from these analyses offer theoretical and practical conclusions with the potential to reinvent marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The SDL can direct researchers’ and managers’ views towards complex value-generation processes. The SL can analyse this process on a managerial level, to derive customer-centric, service perspective-based opportunities to reinvent marketing.

Practical implications

The analysis and principles help marketing break free from offering only value propositions and become an organisation-wide responsibility. Firms must organise service-influenced marketing and create a customer focus among all employees, beyond conventional marketing.

Originality/value

A service perspective on business has key managerial implications and enables researchers and managers to find new, customer-centric, service-influenced marketing approaches.

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Johanna Gummerus

This study seeks to adopt the perspective of service (dominant) logic to investigate the impact of three resource inputs (service content, service process, and service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to adopt the perspective of service (dominant) logic to investigate the impact of three resource inputs (service content, service process, and service configurations) on the perceptions of value of e‐service customers.

Design/methodology/approach

An online study is conducted among 667 customers of a Finnish health‐care web site.

Findings

The study finds that content of various services have differential impacts on customers' perceptions of value. The study also finds that some service configurations (combinations of services) are more value‐enhancing than others.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical study was limited to a Finnish health‐care site. Future studies could use this research model to investigate different services and cultures to improve the generalisability of the findings.

Practical implications

Service providers should note that peer services (such as discussion groups) were more value‐enhancing than professional services (such as an advice database). Recognition of the most appealing services and service configurations enables managers to develop and market their services more effectively.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to demonstrate how e‐service research and practice can benefit by taking a service logic perspective in which service content, service process, and service configurations are treated as input resources in the value‐creation processes of customers.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Anne Rindell, Oskar Korkman and Johanna Gummerus

The present paper seeks to analyse the role of brand images in consumer practices for uncovering brand strength.

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper seeks to analyse the role of brand images in consumer practices for uncovering brand strength.

Design/methodology/approach

By employing a qualitative approach, data are analysed based on three elements that constitute the practices: objects (what tools or resources are required in the practice), images involved, and competences (what competences does the practice require).

Findings

The authors suggest practices as an additional unit of analysis for understanding brand strength based on image. Towards this end, the paper identifies and systematically categorises consumer practices and proposes that consumers develop novel and personal practices related to brands. The findings reveal embedded brand strength in mundane, routinised practices.

Originality/value

The paper presents a novel approach for understanding the past (image heritage) and current (image‐in‐use) dimensions of brand images and their embeddedness in consumer practices.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Johanna Gummerus, Veronica Liljander, Minna Pura and Allard van Riel

Past e‐service research has largely concentrated on customer responses to online retailers. The present study sheds light on the determinants of customer loyalty to a…

Abstract

Past e‐service research has largely concentrated on customer responses to online retailers. The present study sheds light on the determinants of customer loyalty to a content‐based service, a healthcare Web site. Content‐based service providers must build a loyal customer base in order to attract advertisers and sponsors. Lack of trust has been one of the most important reasons for consumers not adopting online services involving financial exchanges, but trust appears to be equally important to exchanges that require divulging sensitive information, such as health issues. Results reveal that loyalty to the health site is satisfaction‐driven, but that trust is the main antecedent of satisfaction. Need fulfilment, responsiveness, security and technical functionality of the Web site are shown to influence trust. Managerial implications are provided.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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