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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2021

Johan Marx and Ronald Henry Mynhardt

The purpose of this paper is to propose an implementation framework for governance in the Ghanaian securities trading industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an implementation framework for governance in the Ghanaian securities trading industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was followed, using participatory action research (PAR) by involving stakeholders from the Ghanaian securities trading industry.

Findings

A governance framework for the Ghanaian securities trading industry is proposed, taking into account the regulatory environment of Ghana, the role of ethical leadership, boards of directors, audit committees, the governance of risk, information technology and internal audit.

Research limitations/implications

This study used PAR because it is a recognised research methodology aimed at problem resolution, knowledge creation and improving professional practice, through the involvement of the interest group. This paper provides a starting point – a practical solution for the securities industry of Ghana, but not generalisable results.

Practical implications

Applying the governance framework will create safeguards against corruption and mismanagement, promote transparency in economic life and assist Ghana in attracting investment, ultimately lowering its cost of capital and contributing to economic growth and development in the country.

Social implications

The implementation of the governance framework will benefit all stakeholders (employees, suppliers and the community at large) as a result of a culture conducive to influencing behaviour, strategy planning and implementation, as well as corporate results and financial sustainability.

Originality/value

The use of PAR assists the practitioners from the Ghanaian securities trading industry in improving their competencies (knowledge, skills, values and attributes) whilst generating a workable solution for their current governance challenges.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Johan Marx and Cecilia Jacoba de Swardt

The purpose of this paper is first to determine the competencies required of risk managers and second to consider the implications of such competencies in determining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is first to determine the competencies required of risk managers and second to consider the implications of such competencies in determining modules for inclusion in the curriculum framework of an undergraduate qualification in risk management.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was followed, involving risk management professionals in a focus group and making use of interactive qualitative analysis (IQA).

Findings

The competencies identified are managerial and risk management knowledge, attributes such as assertiveness and steadfastness and ethical values, as well as people and technical skills. These are explained in greater detail in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The unique contribution of the current research was the innovative use of IQA for data collection, the removal of subjectivity and the rigour in analysing and presenting the results. The results provide a starting point for designing a curriculum that will both meet the requirements of the professional body and will equip graduates with the best possible combination of knowledge, attributes, values and skills needed by the risk management profession. The implications for further research include that a comparative IQA study of the competencies of risk managers using academics from the field could be undertaken, as well as a study of the design, benchmarking and validation of a proposed curriculum for an undergraduate degree in risk management. The purpose of this study was not to compile a curriculum for a new BCom (risk management). However, this was beyond the scope of the current study. IQA uses rigour and eliminates the bias of the researcher, and the one limitation of this research lies in the use of a focus group, which resulted in the findings not being generalizable as the case would have been with a representative sample used in the positivist paradigm and using appropriate statistical analysis. However, this study was exploratory and could serve as a valuable starting point for further research in this area to perform a comprehensive curriculum development.

Practical implications

This study found that constituents of the focus group perceived that the following competencies are required of risk managers, namely, knowledge, skills, attributes and values. These competencies correspond closely with the competencies indicated in the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) Professional Core Competency Model, except that RIMS subdivides knowledge into three categories, namely, business, organisational and risk management knowledge. Similarly, RIMS distinguishes between management skills and technical skills. The attributes identified by the focus group of this study were similar to those identified by RIMS. However, the focus group emphasised values such as integrity, ethical conduct, respect and accountability. However, unlike RIMS, these were not perceived as one of the five core competencies, but rather as a stand-alone competency in its own right, which risk managers need to be successful. RIMS could consider reviewing its core competencies by allocating three closely related aspects, namely communication, collaboration and consultation to technical skills. Core competencies may be replaced by core values, which are literally at the centre of all the competencies required. Such core values are enhanced by the RIMS Code of Ethics (2019) and significantly contribute to the professionalization of risk management. RIMS could also consider providing guidelines to universities for those competencies that could be taught or learnt, to be included in their curricula and to accredit universities who meet such requirements.

Social implications

The findings of this study also serve as a starting point for the reintroduction of a BCom (risk management) degree by Unisa. Despite the requirements of the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and the Council for Higher Education (CHE), this study demonstrated that a specialised degree in risk management needs to be offered to meet the need expressed by IRMSA for professional risk managers in Southern Africa, and such a degree should ideally be curriculated based on the competencies identified in this article. The implication for public policy is that SAQA and the CHE need to reconsider their rigid stance about the composition of specialised qualifications, and rather set a range of 33-50% for subjects from the field of specialisation that must be included in the curricula of specialised degrees. As indicated by this research, a combination of subjects from different disciplines is required to enhance the competencies and employability of risk management graduates.

Originality/value

The use of IQA is a novel way of ensuring rigour and objectivity in arriving at the required knowledge, attributes, values and skills of risk managers, and aids in the compilation of a new curriculum for an undergraduate qualification in risk management, thus ensuring the qualification will provide a competency-based qualification that will meet the needs of the profession.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Tomas Riha

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and…

Abstract

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and, conversely, innovative thought structures and attitudes have almost always forced economic institutions and modes of behaviour to adjust. We learn from the history of economic doctrines how a particular theory emerged and whether, and in which environment, it could take root. We can see how a school evolves out of a common methodological perception and similar techniques of analysis, and how it has to establish itself. The interaction between unresolved problems on the one hand, and the search for better solutions or explanations on the other, leads to a change in paradigma and to the formation of new lines of reasoning. As long as the real world is subject to progress and change scientific search for explanation must out of necessity continue.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 12 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2017

Riccardo Bellofiore and Scott Carter

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers…

Abstract

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers to some of these developments. First and perhaps foremost is the fact that as of September 2016 Sraffa’s archival material has been uploaded onto the website of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge University, as digital colour images; this chapter introduces readers to the history of these events. This history provides sharp relief on the extant debates over the role of the archival material in leading to the final publication of Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities, and readers are provided a brief sketch of these matters. The varied nature of Sraffa scholarship is demonstrated by the different aspects of Sraffa’s intellectual legacy which are developed and discussed in the various entries of our Symposium. The conclusion is reached that we are on the cusp of an exciting phase change of tremendous potential in Sraffa scholarship.

Details

Including a Symposium on New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-539-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

Details

The Political Economy of Antitrust
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-093-6

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Johan Galtung

Abstract

Details

Foresight, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Katarina Lagerström, Roger Schweizer and Johan Jakobsson

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature discussing the internationalization of research and development (R&D) among multinational companies by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature discussing the internationalization of research and development (R&D) among multinational companies by proposing a process description to capture the development of local R&D capabilities in subsidiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors build the conceptualization not only on the prevailing literature on resource management, subsidiary evolution and subsidiary initiatives, but also on empirical observations.

Findings

A process in four phases is distinguished to describe the evolution of R&D capabilities in subsidiaries: the identification of an opportunity in the host country that triggers the establishment of local R&D capabilities; the gathering of support – from the host country and from MNC internally – and resources; the bundling of the resources to build capabilities; and finally the leveraging of the capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

By offering a conceptualization of the process through which subsidiaries build R&D capabilities, the authors contribute to the literature on R&D internationalization that hitherto has neglected the central role played by subsidiaries and the fact that a subsidiary needs to develop and manage resources and capabilities to change its R&D related role and/or mandate within the MNC.

Originality/value

By providing a process perspective on MNCs internationalization of R&D focussing on the development and management of R&D capabilities at subsidiaries, the paper adds a more dynamic dimension to the previously rather static view on R&D internationalization.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Thomas O. Nitsch

In a seeming attempt to legitimate or otherwise dignify social economics (Économie sociale, etc.), “named” economists (Adam Smith, Karl Marx et al.) have been dubbed…

Abstract

In a seeming attempt to legitimate or otherwise dignify social economics (Économie sociale, etc.), “named” economists (Adam Smith, Karl Marx et al.) have been dubbed social economists and/or regarded as having made significant but unrecognised contributions thereto. Conspicuously absent from that roster of celebrities are Léon Walras, économiste social par excellence, et al., who have distinguished themselves in the mainstream but also have done social economy(ics) explicitly, i.e. by that designation. Included in that illustrious et al. list are François Quesnay, J.B. Say, Friedrich von Wieser and Knut Wicksell (inter alios). Their due recognition, as per the present essay, cannot help but measurably further legitimise/dignify social economics.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 27 no. 7/8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1982

Anthony Smith

The system of moving letters devised by Johan Gutenberg established, or rather, confirmed a chain of specialist relationships which runs: author, printer…

Abstract

The system of moving letters devised by Johan Gutenberg established, or rather, confirmed a chain of specialist relationships which runs: author, printer, bookseller/publisher, reader, librarian. For five centuries these have been the principal actors in the politics of the text; they have fought one another and depended upon one another; they have been held together (or apart) by a body of law and professional doctrine. Printer, bookseller/publisher and their ancillary crafts and trades were all once firmly held within the Stationers' Company but as the printing press technology spread beyond guild control in the late 17th century these functions diverged more and more. We inherit the rituals and procedures of these separate professional groups and their relative status. They have seemed to us as inevitable as the seasons and as essentially separate. Not even those revolutionary prophets of the early twentieth century who predicted the withering away of the state considered that a technology might arrive, as suddenly but as profoundly needed as the printing press, which would lead us to question the settled assumptions of the renaissance. For that is what the new technology of the text urges us to do; at least, to dig out some of the unargued assumptions about the nature of authorship, say, compared with librarianship, about the relationship also between publisher and bookseller, publisher and librarian, and so forth.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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