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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Johan Anderberg and John Morris

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate to advertising professionals and students with an interest in marketing how one of the largest and most successful…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate to advertising professionals and students with an interest in marketing how one of the largest and most successful advertising companies in the world operates.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a discussion and interview

Findings

Corporate and financial transparency go hand in hand with authentic brands that consumers trust. Brands must stay true to what they are, especially when a brand or company is in crisis. Bill Ford, Chairman and CEO, of Ford is an example of an authentic and truthful leader who is out front explaining to the American people what he is doing and why.

Originality/value

Advertising professionals and students with an interest in marketing will learn some key facts about how one of the largest and most successful advertising companies in the world operates.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Tom McManus, Johan Anderberg and Harold Lazarus

To show that retirement is no longer a given, but that not being able to retire may not be a bad thing. Remaining in the workforce might end up being a win‐win situation.

Abstract

Purpose

To show that retirement is no longer a given, but that not being able to retire may not be a bad thing. Remaining in the workforce might end up being a win‐win situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The reader is given an introduction of some of the issues related to retirement, such as demographic, economic, and legal factors. The article discusses how these and other factors affect our ability to retire at 65. Some of the positive aspects of not retiring, including better physical and mental health for the individual and a stronger society, are also introduced.

Findings

Retirement as we know it is very likely to soon be a thing of the past. Changes in demographic, economic, and legal factors are forcing us to look at retirement from a different point of view. Studies have shown that people who remain in the workforce at an older age are better off, both physically and mentally. In addition to improved health, being an active contributor to the community will serve the society as a whole.

Practical implications

The article can serve as an eye‐opener to some people who take retirement for granted. It can also help people that fear not being able to retire, to look more favorably upon the fact that they may have to work additional years before retiring.

Originality/value

Instead of only discussing the negative aspects of an aging population, the authors take a different approach and present no retirement as an opportunity, not a problem. Don't fear it, prepare for it.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Erik Berggren and Rob Bernshteyn

To explain the logic of value creation through increased organizational transparency of human capital.

Abstract

Purpose

To explain the logic of value creation through increased organizational transparency of human capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare the status of today's organizations with other areas of life where transparency has been a fundamental driver of efficiency. Further, the authors break transparency down into logical steps of value creation. Insight is based on hands‐on experience working with several companies on these issues as well as designing software to support the logic.

Findings

Modern companies are taking steps to drive company performance through increased efficiency delivered by increased transparency but few take it all the way. No universal model is prescribed but a clear sequence of foundations that need to be in place is discovered.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on the authors' research and learning from working in this field. Further research in the field of organizational transparency as a means to drive company performance is suggested.

Originality/value

This paper takes a different angle than the traditional view.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Carol Simon

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of information transparency in a for‐profit business environment, and explain the importance and relevance of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of information transparency in a for‐profit business environment, and explain the importance and relevance of the concept in creating a transparent organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of a sample of the existing literature focusing on transparency, a common theme regarding information was observed. Most research addresses information from a technology/systems perspective not as a basis of creating or modifying corporate strategy.

Findings

In a corporate environment, information transparency is reached when internal decision makers receive, at their desktop, the internal and external information necessary to make sound business decisions. The infrastructure and the technology of the computer systems used to deliver the information are not of primary importance to information transparency. Information technology systems are the means of delivery, the importance and value of information transparency is the content of the message and the actions that result from them.

Originality/value

This analysis may provide a rationale for the introduction of a new or expanded corporate information service outside the structure of an information technology department.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Tom McManus and Dave Delaney

The purpose of this paper is to convey useful and practical advice on one's development as a manager from the perspective of a successful entrepreneur.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to convey useful and practical advice on one's development as a manager from the perspective of a successful entrepreneur.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on lessons learned from founding and leading a $300 million business.

Findings

Beware of the transition from school to business. Take jobs that offer real experience. Showing up is 90 percent of the battle. If you are not in a job that you consider to be as much fun as what you do when you are not working, then you should go and try to find that job. The best decisions you make will be the mistakes you avoid. If it doesn't make sense it can't last. When you are explaining you are losing. Hire people who care. Break down barriers to communication. Embrace humor. You can't lead when your pants are too tight. Never ignore the last mile problem. Big egos destroy companies.

Originality/value

Valuable for managers at every stage of their development, and especially for those just entering the work force.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Susan J. Drucker and Gary Gumpert

The purpose of this paper is to argue that transparency is a two‐sided concept associated with openness and surveillance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that transparency is a two‐sided concept associated with openness and surveillance.

Design/methodology/approach

A position is asserted arguing the need to examine the fact that both transparency and surveillance are management tools in an information society. It is argued that from transparency, to translucence to opacity there are degrees of openness with technical and policy filters imposed intentionally and unintentionally in between those who observe and those who are observed. The illusion of transparency is considered along with the notion that gatekeeping or filtering is associated with making relevant information available.

Findings

Transparency and filtering the flow of information are considered as essential to the governance of organizations' rooted social contract theory.

Practical implications

Transparency and limits on transparency should be proactively addressed in organizational structure and policy and must be communicated effectively for both pragmatic and symbolic purposes. This further suggests the need for media literacy training within organizations.

Originality/value

The authors conclude that the perceived right of access cannot be underestimated as a fundamental management tool. This paper proposes the publication of an organizational “Bill of Rights” to demonstrate a commitment to transparency.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Harold Lazarus and Richard Davis

The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of organic management and demonstrate how it can be applied in practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of organic management and demonstrate how it can be applied in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an interview with Rich Davis, a visionary executive.

Findings

Richard Davis is an extremely creative manager who transformed a small, mediocre firm into a large, superbly well‐managed company. Originating as a family retail optical business, today nearly 35 million people enjoy the many benefits of Davis Vision. Your opinions about management, leadership, employees and business problems will never be quite the same after considering the ideas of this master of wholistic, organic, integrative management. For example, associates are considered internal customers and must be delighted first, even before external customers. Associates interact in measurable and effective ways that allows the company to focus on its vision, mission, and goals while embracing a constantly changing environment and grow.

Originality/value

The great wisdom of Richard Davis has been distilled into a very few pages. It is as if the major works of Peter Drucker were so distilled. The editors suggest that you read and reread this short piece.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Robert Salvatico

The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of transparent leadership in a small family owned hotel, the Wingate Inn, Garden City, New York. The goal is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of transparent leadership in a small family owned hotel, the Wingate Inn, Garden City, New York. The goal is to demonstrate that one can create a more productive, open work place and ultimately more satisfied, loyal guests. The article is written to provide the reader with an every day approach to management from the small business perspective. It is intended to remind the reader that straightforward dealings and common sense can usually provide the best solutions in a constantly changing and challenge filled environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The article describes the common sense approach that the author as general manager employs in the development of a transparent workplace. A short series of fundamental management philosophies that find their root in transparency are used to describe his approach to transparent leadership and the resulting benefits. It is further explained through the retelling of an actual situation that developed within the hotel's housekeeping management team, and how he was able to avoid a potentially explosive and costly situation through a direct and open application of these core management disciplines.

Findings

The author contends that the promotion of transparent management principles to his associates will result in their exercise of these same principles in their day‐to‐day management of the hotel, their relation with hotel guests, and one another.

Originality/value

The article offers insights into the application of transparency to management of a hotel and achieving excellent results.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Ozum Ucok

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the idea of transparency of understanding from a communications perspective, and mindful listening as a mode of communication to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the idea of transparency of understanding from a communications perspective, and mindful listening as a mode of communication to achieve it.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a discussion and Analysis.

Findings

Practical methods to achieve mindful listening are described. Transparency of understanding is publicly and interactively achieved through carefully orchestrated visible and audible behaviors. Drawing on spiritual traditions and language and social interaction research, the author suggests that our active and verbal input, our receptivity and embodied presence, including body orientation, facial expression, and eye behavior are significant factors in creating and displaying transparency of understanding.

Originality/value

The author suggests that if we could actually be present to listen to each other in the workplace with close attention we might minimize much misunderstanding and confusion, and maybe reduce the amount of time and energy we spend in repairing what we might have missed or misunderstood because we were not really paying attention?

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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