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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Joey F. George

Using the theory of planned behavior as the theoretical base, data collected through a semi‐annual survey of Web users were used to determine if beliefs about privacy and…

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7150

Abstract

Using the theory of planned behavior as the theoretical base, data collected through a semi‐annual survey of Web users were used to determine if beliefs about privacy and Internet trustworthiness helped determine attitudes towards the Internet, which were thought to affect intent to make Internet purchases. Intent, in turn, was thought to affect actual purchasing behavior. Taking Internet experience into account, general support for the model was found.

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Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Joey F. George, Kevin Scheibe, Anthony M. Townsend and Brian Mennecke

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which newly agile organizations followed 2001’s Agile Manifesto, especially in terms of the 12 principles of the agile…

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1806

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which newly agile organizations followed 2001’s Agile Manifesto, especially in terms of the 12 principles of the agile approach, as included in the Manifesto.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted in-depth case studies of groups in three large business organizations that had recently adopted agile. Two researchers spent one day at each site, attending daily standups and conducting interviews with managers, developers and customers.

Findings

Across the three organizations, developers were faithful to two agile principles: the primacy of delivering valuable software continually and regular reflections on the process with an eye toward improvement. The developers were uniformly unfaithful to the principle that requires face-to-face communication. Each organization varied in their adherence to the remaining nine principles. Obstacles to faithful adoption included the experience of the organization with agile, the extent to which the industry was regulated and the extent to which developers and customers were physically dispersed.

Originality/value

While past research on agile development is extensive, this paper examines perspectives on the method and its adoption through the lens of the original Agile Manifesto and its 12 principles. The principles were grouped into three broader categories – software delivery, people and process – to provide additional insights and to sharpen the analysis.

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Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Joey F. George, Suzanne Iacono and Rob Kling

Quotes recent (1994) literature suggesting that workers receivemore training and support in their local work area than from acentralized management information systems…

Abstract

Quotes recent (1994) literature suggesting that workers receive more training and support in their local work area than from a centralized management information systems (MIS) group. Suggests that there is therefore little knowledge about how users learn the computing skills necessary for them to achieve their tasks. Explores the issues. Presents four case studies, two having a central MIS training and support functions and two having none. Observes that in four work groups members depended on locally emerging arrangements for training and support.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Joey F. George

Several opinion polls have found that many consumers resist making purchases via the Internet because of their concerns about the privacy of the personal information they…

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26435

Abstract

Several opinion polls have found that many consumers resist making purchases via the Internet because of their concerns about the privacy of the personal information they provide to Internet merchants. Using the theory of planned behavior as its basis, this study investigated the relationships among beliefs about Internet privacy and trustworthiness, along with beliefs about perceived behavioral control and the expectations of important others, and online purchasing behavior. Data were collected from 193 college students. Analysis of the data indicates that beliefs about trustworthiness positively affect attitudes toward buying online, which in turn positively affect purchasing behavior. Beliefs about self‐efficacy regarding purchasing positively affect perceived behavioral control, which in turn affects online purchasing behavior. In short, respondents who believed in the trustworthiness of the Internet and in their own abilities to buy online were more likely to make Internet purchases than were those without such beliefs.

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Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Michael H. Dickey, D. Harrison McKnight and Joey F. George

This study aims to examine how two types of trust affect five key franchisee attitudes/behaviors within a setting where franchisees have strong contractual ties to the…

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2222

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how two types of trust affect five key franchisee attitudes/behaviors within a setting where franchisees have strong contractual ties to the franchisor. The five attitudes/behaviors are: identification and satisfaction with the franchisor, compliance and non‐compliance with franchisor directives, and perceived relationship quality. These attitudes/behaviors were chosen because research has found each to affect franchise performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The model in the paper features two trusting beliefs that influence attitudes/behaviors. The study gathers US franchisee questionnaire data then analyzes the model using partial least squares techniques.

Findings

Trusting belief‐competence was found to reduce non‐compliance with the franchisor, and also increase identification with the franchisor. Both trusting belief‐competence and trusting belief‐honesty were found to enhance satisfaction with the franchisor and perceived relationship quality. Neither of these two trusting beliefs was found to influence compliance with franchisor directives. Perceived mutual commitment appears to strongly influence both trusting beliefs, whereas length of time as a franchisee does not.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support relational contracting theory, showing that even within a contract, trust exerts a significant influence on vital franchisee attitudes. Other research shows these attitudes/behaviors influence franchise performance, though the present study does not measure performance.

Practical implications

The results suggest franchisee trust is key to the ongoing franchise relationship. Hence, franchisors should try to build franchisee trust. They can do so by enhancing mutual commitment and by supplying well‐conceived new products and marketing campaigns.

Originality/value

This study clearly shows the value of franchisee trust and suggests several ways to build it.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Maomao Chi, Jing Zhao and Joey F. George

Based on the literature of IT strategic alignment and e-collaboration, the purpose of this paper is to specify how e-business strategic alignment (e-alignment) influences…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the literature of IT strategic alignment and e-collaboration, the purpose of this paper is to specify how e-business strategic alignment (e-alignment) influences e-collaboration capabilities and improves firm performance, and whether the time-lag effect existed in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the research hypotheses using a field survey of 145 Chinese corporations. The research model was validated using SmartPLS 2.0 with both subjective and objective data collected from the survey and Oriana database.

Findings

The results support the notion of a positive and significant link between e-alignment and e-collaboration capabilities and between e-collaboration capabilities and firm performance. The authors also show that the effect of e-alignment on performance is fully mediated by e-collaboration capabilities and that e-collaboration with suppliers has a one-year time-lag effect on firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research extends and integrates the literature on IT strategic alignment and e-collaboration, and explains why and how e-alignment generates firm performance.

Practical implications

This paper includes two implications for managers. First, when formulating e-business strategies, managers should focus on establishing e-collaboration capabilities with partners. Second, the downstream process is the direct sources of business value. Managers should take the establishment of e-selling process as a critical business strategy.

Originality/value

By focussed on intermediate factors and time-lag effects, this study provides significant implications for IT strategic alignment and e-collaboration literature.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

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156

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Ella Guangxin Xu, Chris Graves, Yuan George Shan and Joey W. Yang

The paper aims to examine the effect of corporate governance (CG) on innovation investment, with consideration of ownership types and legal jurisdictions.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the effect of corporate governance (CG) on innovation investment, with consideration of ownership types and legal jurisdictions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' empirical analysis is based on a sample of publicly listed family businesses (FBs) from the top-500-list that matched worldwide with non-family counterparts from 2009 to 2018. The study uses a holistic measure of CG to mitigate the conflicting impact of individual CG components found in prior studies. This measure is applied to examine the moderating role of firm ownership type and legal jurisdiction.

Findings

The authors' results demonstrate that CG positively influences innovation investment. This positive relationship is more pronounced in FBs than in non-family businesses (NFBs) and is more prevalent in civil law economies than in common law economies.

Originality/value

The study holistically examines the effect of CG, capturing the combination of all individual governance mechanisms and their influence on innovation investment. The study further shows that comprehensive CG has diverse impacts on innovation investment when considering family control and legal jurisdiction.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Joseph J. Branin, George D'Elia and Douglas Lund

“Integration” in this project focuses on both technical integration and organizational integration to bring a form of coherence and unity to the support and delivery of…

Abstract

“Integration” in this project focuses on both technical integration and organizational integration to bring a form of coherence and unity to the support and delivery of information services. Immediate success in integration did not happen. After six years, the Integrated Information Center is still evolving. Unexpected progress has been made with the end‐users. The technological issues have progressed very well. However, the organizational issues have been the most difficult to manage.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Argha Ray and Anjali Kaushik

Cyberspace is a virtual environment where instantaneous communications are initiated and consumed using computer networks without any natural or artificial boundaries…

Abstract

Purpose

Cyberspace is a virtual environment where instantaneous communications are initiated and consumed using computer networks without any natural or artificial boundaries. These communications are not only an exchange of information but also a catharsis on the socio-political environment of the real world. This explosion of electronic expression is often detrimental to the traditional secretive maneuvers of nation states and the exercise of its power. Unable to come to terms with the new reality nation states through legislative action or otherwise attempt to assert its sovereignty in the space that has no political and societal boundaries. This may lead to an encroachment on basic human rights that often have constitutional guarantees in the real world but may be violated in the online milieu. This paper aims to investigate this issue in detail and evaluate whether nation states are using cyber-security as a propaganda tool to transgress on electronic expression.

Design/methodology/approach

The Website of the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights states “In December 2013, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 68/167, which expresses deep concern at the negative impact that surveillance and interception of communications may have on human rights”. It further says “The General Assembly called on all States to review their procedures, practices and legislation related to communications surveillance, interception and collection of personal data and emphasized the need for States to ensure the full and effective implementation of their obligations under international human rights law”. With this development, this paper seeks to unravel the role of nation states in using cybersecurity as a propaganda tool by raising the specter of threat to national security and economic wellbeing. The paper is based on exploratory research with data compilation from secondary sources. To collect data, various research papers, books and journals have been referenced and data available in public domain has been accumulated.

Findings

This paper has tried to unravel state action on cyberspace which often runs counter to the concept of civil liberties. It indicates that in terms of both national security and economic impact, cybercrime represent a very nominal threat vector. Also, cybercrime as compared with other forms of crime is again nominal. Finally, cyber laws and policies of different countries need to be more nuanced such as to allow space for civil liberties. Overall, the propaganda surrounding the malaise of cybercrime seems to be more hype than real. We already have examples of countries who have transgressed into electronic expression in cyber space. Therefore, UN has a valid reason to raise a red flag on this unfolding issue.

Originality/value

This paper was published at 21st Americas Conference of Information Systems held at Puerto Rico, USA, between August 13-15, 2015 (AMCIS, 2015). The authors of this paper seek review by Editors of the Journal for Republication of original work. The authors have taken cognizance of the Originality Guidelines for Emerald published at this URL www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/authors/writing/originality.htm

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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