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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Elza Fátima Rosa Veloso, Leonardo Nelmi Trevisan, Rodrigo Cunha da Silva and Joel Souza Dutra

The purpose of this paper is to, which involved 123 students in their last year of an administration course at a private university in the city of São Paulo, Brazil…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to, which involved 123 students in their last year of an administration course at a private university in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, evaluate the importance of analyzing the pressure from new technologies on the careers of young university students from a career theory perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

From the perspective of traditional theories, the authors used “career anchors,” and from the perspective of non-traditional theories, “intelligent careers,” in which people develop three competency groups that are transferable between organizations: knowing why; knowing how; and knowing whom. The hypotheses the authors raised were analyzed using statistical techniques and the following results were obtained: young people do not see new technologies as a threat to their current job; people who see the “Knowing How” competence as being more developed feel less pressure from new technologies; non-traditional theories show a greater potential to analyze technological pressure than traditional theories; and, finally, the nature of people’s jobs produces different impacts on the pressure of new technologies on their careers, since people who occupy positions involving more human interaction with internal or external clients feel less threatened.

Findings

It was found that the lowest mean among the constructs analyzed was the pressure from technology on career. The correlations between the competencies of intelligent careers and the perception of the pressure from technology on career were weak, but significant, whereas the “Knowing How” competency was negatively correlated with the pressure caused by technology. There was no significant influence of the anchors on the pressure from technology on career. However, incorporating the competencies of intelligent careers improved the statistical model’s fit. In associating job positions with the pressure from technology on career, administrative and operational positions showed higher averages than sales associate and management positions.

Originality/value

Broadly speaking, it can be noted that traditional career theories, especially the vocational counseling approach, are not sufficient to explain the impact of new technologies on careers. At the same time, one way of coping with the pressure brought about by technological advances may be in using technology itself to develop “useful professional skills,” in a manner consistent with “intelligent careers.”

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2177-8736

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Rodrigo Cunha da Silva, Joel Souza Dutra, Elza Fátima Rosa Veloso, André Luiz Fischer and Leonardo Nelmi Trevisan

This study aims to investigate the existence of delimitations more suited to the emergence of generations in Brazil, and to assess generational perceptions on constructs…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the existence of delimitations more suited to the emergence of generations in Brazil, and to assess generational perceptions on constructs of the work environment and their influences on organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The perceptions of 102,540 respondents employed by 394 organizations were classified into nine constructs. The methodology used entailed an initial confirmatory factorial analysis, which was undertaken to investigate the validity of the proposed measurement model. Regression analyses were applied to test the relationship between work environment and commitment.

Findings

The results highlight that the Baby Boomer generation attributed more value to the meaning of work and corporate social responsibility. Meaning of work, learning and development were given a high level of importance in the results for Generation X. Generation Y values learning and development, relationships with co-workers and Work-life balance more than the other two generations.

Research limitations/implications

This research is classified as a cross-sectional study that does not allow us to substantiate whether differences between the groups were caused by influence of generations or the age of respondents. Therefore, nationwide surveys capable of offsetting the age effect on generational differences are still necessary. Another constraint is related to the fact that only data from the survey that annually elects the “Best Companies to Work for in Brazil” were used for undertaking this study. Moreover, because all variables were collected simultaneously from the same source, the authors recognize that the results could have problems related to common method biases.

Practical implications

The authors believe that the identification of critical dimensions of workers’ perception regarding the work environment equips human resources professionals with the ability to implement policies and practices that align people management with the differing desires of each generation, effectively ensuring commitment from these professionals.

Social implications

This study may contribute to researchers by highlighting the need for temporal outlines suited to the Brazilian reality, which might also inspire further research on the country’s generations, even associating them with other themes, such as values, personality and professional motivation.

Originality/value

As the main contributions, the authors have sought to highlight that generational differences may be related to specific periods in each country’s historical context. The authors also show the determining factors influencing each generation’s affective commitment and justify each of their choices.

Details

Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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