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1 – 10 of 315
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Joel French and Robert Weathersby

Only 55% of patients receive recommended care, with little difference found between care recommended for prevention, to address acute episodes, or to treat chronic…

Abstract

Only 55% of patients receive recommended care, with little difference found between care recommended for prevention, to address acute episodes, or to treat chronic conditions (McGlynn et al, 2003). The lag time between the discovery of more effective forms of medical treatment and their incorporation into routine patient care averages seventeen (17) years (IOM). Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) has been widely documented as a necessary tool to reduce preventable medication and other related errors but only 7.4% of acute care hospitals in the United States utilize CPOE with appropriate rules and evidence (HIMSS Analytics). The most fundamental building block for CPOE is the evidence based order set, but complexities associated with creating, managing and updating order sets have introduced major obstacles to CPOE implementation efforts. Chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or arthritis affect more than 130 million Americans directly, and account for 7 in 10 deaths. Further, these chronic conditions consume 75% of all healthcare spending, and account for nearly two-thirds of the growth in health spending over the past 20 years -costing the U. S. economy $1 trillion annually (Almanac of Chronic Conditions, 2008 Edition). Estimates suggest the average patient upon hospitalization has 2.75 diagnoses - meaning "appropriate care" must span and synthesize multiple morbidity-specific best practices to effectively administer care to that "average" patient. The traditional approach to treating patients with evidence based protocols requires a physician to perform an ad hoc exercise of "mental merging" - reconciling duplicate candidate orders across multiple order sets to treat a patient with co-morbidities (today's norm). A more clinically effective, productive, and patient safety-centric alternative is to employ a proprietary software merging algorithm. These advanced algorithms remove duplicate orders, resolve conflicts, completes validation of the appropriate medical evidence and organizes the resulting merged order set so the physician can succinctly address the patients' often complicated treatment by focusing on the unique combination of labs, medications, etc. appropriate for the specific presenting conditions. This article describes a patent-pending propriety method of algorithmically merging multiple independent order sets for patients with co-morbid and chronic conditions into a single, maintenance free and evidence-based order set that can be immediately implemented into physician workflow to satisfy "Meaningful Use" guidelines for incremental provider reimbursement based on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) legislation.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Lovanirina Ramboarison-Lalao, Chris Brewster and Pierre-Yves Boyer

The purpose of this paper is to explore the contextual determinants of transition from expatriation to migration (TEM) among ministers of religion originating from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the contextual determinants of transition from expatriation to migration (TEM) among ministers of religion originating from the developing world.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used in-depth analysis of narratives of four African religious ministers working in France, plus interviews with their five superiors and three host country national colleagues.

Findings

The findings point to personal-level, organisational-level and country-level contextual determinants, which come into play as levers or barriers in the “TEM” process.

Originality/value

The study identifies a new category of global mobility research at the intersection of expatriation and migration and develops a theoretical framework which points to the positive and negative influence of three-layered contextual determinants on how expatriated low-status church ministers from the developing world become migrants. The authors found a so far unreported determinant of the personal context: the role of a world view: very visible as “God centrality” in the participants. Results also shed new light on the international careers of this overlooked category of “non-traditional expatriates” from Africa.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Subramanian Rama Iyer and Joel T. Harper

The purpose of this paper is to test whether investors take flight to safety when sentiment is low. In other words, do safe firms perform better than risky firms following…

2309

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether investors take flight to safety when sentiment is low. In other words, do safe firms perform better than risky firms following periods of low sentiment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using cash flow volatility and the percent of bullish investors as proxies for risk and investor sentiment the paper tests the relationship between sentiment and returns conditional on risk this performance. Second, a cross-sectional analysis is conducted based on individual firm characteristics and sentiment to explain annual returns.

Findings

The paper finds that there is a negative relationship between investor sentiment and the return of risky companies, which is contrary to prior studies. All told, risky companies perform worse following periods of high investor sentiment.

Originality/value

This paper presents evidence contrary to extant literature and that there is no concerted flight to safety. Investor sentiment has little influence on safe stocks.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Julie Anna Guidry, Barry J. Babin, William G. Graziano and W. Joel Schneider

The region where a wine is produced is a factor that influences consumers' preferences and price perceptions. For most consumers, a wine from an established place like…

1388

Abstract

Purpose

The region where a wine is produced is a factor that influences consumers' preferences and price perceptions. For most consumers, a wine from an established place like France would be preferred over a wine from less established place, like Texas. However, a consumer's identity with their home area (not well known for wine) may override such an effect. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to determine whether a wine's geographic origin influences wine preference and price perceptions and, if so, whether identity with a place and/or wine expertise moderate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 257 students from a Texas university sample and rate two identical wines – yet one is labeled as from France and the other as from Texas. Their identification with Texas and their wine expertise are also measured. Paired sample t‐tests and repeated measures MANOCA are used to analyze the data.

Findings

The paper finds that a wine's country of origin has a strong effect on consumers' preferences and price perceptions. Specifically, consumers prefer the French wine over Texas wine and are willing to pay more for the French wine. Consumers' identification with Texas does not significantly mitigate the effects of country of origin; those who score low on Texas identity as well as those who score high had similar ratings for the wines. Similarly, no moderating effects for wine expertise are found.

Originality/value

This research shows the strong effect of county of origin even when participants actually sample the (identical) wines. It offers value by showing that the identity with a region provides little help in overcoming this effect and that wine producers and regions should consider strategies other than appealing to a consumer's identity with the region.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Comics, Games and Transmedia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-108-7

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Mathieu Hikaru Desan

The growth of the nationalist right in Europe and the United States has set off a debate over whether “economic anxiety” or “racial resentment” is at the root of this…

Abstract

The growth of the nationalist right in Europe and the United States has set off a debate over whether “economic anxiety” or “racial resentment” is at the root of this phenomenon. Examining the case of the French National Front, I suggest that this is a poor way of posing the question of the significance of class in explaining the rise of the nationalist right. Recent advances by the National Front—particularly among working-class voters—have tended to be attributed to the party's strategic pivot toward a “leftist” economic program and an embrace of the republican tradition. This in turn has been critically interpreted in two different ways. Some take the FN’s strategic pivot at face value and see the party's success as the expression of a new political cleavage between cosmopolitanism and communitarianism. Others see the National Front's embrace of republicanism as a cynical ploy hiding its true face. Both interpretations, however, point to a strategy of “republican defense” as a means to counteract the National Front. I argue that this strategy is likely to misfire and that class remains central to explaining—and countering—the rise of the National Front, albeit in a peculiar way. Working-class support for the National Front does indeed appear to be driven primarily by ethno-cultural, not class, interests, but this is itself predicated on a historical decline in the political salience of class due to the neoliberal depoliticization of the economy. I argue that it was this disarticulation of class identity that helped deliver the working-class vote to the National Front and that any strategy for combating the nationalist right must thus find new ways to articulate a class identity capable of neutralizing racist and chauvinist articulations.

Details

Rethinking Class and Social Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-020-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Kafia Ayadi and Joël Bree

This paper aims to describe an ethnographic research study conducted within French families in order to examine the transfer of food learning between parents and children.

1376

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an ethnographic research study conducted within French families in order to examine the transfer of food learning between parents and children.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic study in the respondents' home was conducted. Semi‐directive interviews with children and parents and observation were carried out in heterogeneous families.

Findings

Results indicate that food meal time is a way of socializing family members in consumption skills related to food. Food learning took place in two ways: from parents to children and from children to parents. Through different socialization factors, children will discover new food products or food practices and will be able to bring them to the home. By sharing these new experiences, children teach (directly or indirectly) parents new consumption skills related to the food domain. The food environment (e.g: familial atmosphere, interactions around the meal), more than the act of eating itself allows for a better understanding of food transmission within the family.

Research limitations/implications

These findings would be of benefit to public policy as well as to investors and food manufacturers by integrating the reverse socialization aspect. Limits and research perspectives are discussed after the presentation of the results.

Originality/value

The paper investigates interactions between parents and children within their natural setting: their home.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Flore Deboscker, Mathieu Nacher, Antoine Adenis, Florence Huber, Aude Lucarelli, Laura Asensio, Marie Daniel, Vanessa Schiemsky and Timothee Bonifay

Incarcerated women are a vulnerable population in terms of sexual and reproductive health. In French Guiana, most incarcerated women come from unsafe environments and are…

Abstract

Purpose

Incarcerated women are a vulnerable population in terms of sexual and reproductive health. In French Guiana, most incarcerated women come from unsafe environments and are incarcerated because of drug trafficking. Medical follow-up processes used in prison (medical assessment on arrival, and then two half-days per week upon request but without an obstetrician-gynecologist) does not allow for a thorough assessment of the impact of incarceration on women prisoners’ health to take place. In the absence of data, the purpose of this study was to describe incarcerated women’s experiences in relation to sexual and reproductive health.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted among French-speaking adult women who had been incarcerated for at least four months in a French Guianan prison. Menstruation, contraception, pregnancy, abortion, sexually transmitted infections and sexuality were described by means of interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

A total of 14 women were interviewed. They suffered from menstrual cycle disorders, poor hygiene and menstrual insecurity. They appeared to have emotionally disinvested sexuality. However, intra-prison sexual activity existed for some (masturbation, conjugal prison visits, homosexual intercourse between fellow prisoners). Homosexual relations were a source of discrimination. Being pregnant while incarcerated was viewed negatively. A lack of knowledge about sexual and reproductive health and high-risk behaviors such as piercing and tattooing practices were widespread.

Originality/value

Incarceration is a vulnerable time for women’s sexual and reproductive health. Sexual activity exposes women to risks and discrimination that should be taken into account in a multidisciplinary approach adapted to the prison environment.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Peni Fukofuka, Matthew Scobie and Glenn Finau

This study explores accounting practice in an Indigenous organization. This organization is embedded within a rural Aboriginal community in the country currently known as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores accounting practice in an Indigenous organization. This organization is embedded within a rural Aboriginal community in the country currently known as Australia. In doing so, this study illustrates the intertwining of accounting practice, practitioners, organizations and social/cultural context, while recognizing that the cultural embeddedness of accounting is not uniform.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical materials were collected as part of a qualitative field study with an Indigenous organization. Specific methods include interviews, informal conversations, documentary reviews and participant observations. These materials were analysed through a Bourdieusian perspective.

Findings

By working with Indigenous Peoples on the ground, rather than relying on secondary materials, this study highlights how the values of a community challenge and reorient accounting practice towards community aspirations. This study illustrates how fields beyond the organization influence accounting practice, including in budgeting and assurance.

Originality/value

Exploring Indigenous practices of accounting maintains Indigenous agency and opens up space for alternative understandings and practices of accounting. By illustrating how a community can influence the accounting practice of an organization, this study has implications for wider understandings of the cultural embeddedness of mainstream accounting and possible alternatives.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jo Carby‐Hall

Proposes to treat social law contracts by covering the two most important aspects of the contract of employment, and also the collective agreement. Covers the contract of…

2636

Abstract

Proposes to treat social law contracts by covering the two most important aspects of the contract of employment, and also the collective agreement. Covers the contract of employment in full with all the integral laws explained as required, including its characteristics, written particulars, sources or regulations, with regard to employers, are also covered. Lengthy coverage of the collective agreement is also included, showing legal as well as moral (!) requirements, also included are cases in law that are covered in depth.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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