Search results

1 – 10 of 33
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Joel D. Nicholson and Lee P. Stepina

Examines work beliefs across three nations (The People's Republic of China (PRC), the USA and Venezuela) using Buchholz's work belief scales. Finds strong support for the…

Abstract

Examines work beliefs across three nations (The People's Republic of China (PRC), the USA and Venezuela) using Buchholz's work belief scales. Finds strong support for the proposition that work belief systems vary across cultures. Specifically, the work ethic was found to be strongest in the PRC and weaker in the USA and Venezuela. Venezuelans were the strongest in organizational belief system scores. Indicates fundamental differences in motivation to work in the three countries. Discusses specific results and provides conclusions.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Kelly C. Strong, Joel D. Nicholson and Warren R. Nielsen

Balancing the relationship between commitment to work and commitment to family is becoming a major issue in the modern workplace of industrialized nations. In addition…

Abstract

Balancing the relationship between commitment to work and commitment to family is becoming a major issue in the modern workplace of industrialized nations. In addition, regional economic integration is fast becoming a reality in all three legs of the TRIAD (Europe, Japan, and the United States). Rationalized production is occurring at a fast pace across North America. The Enterprise for the Americas Initiative seeks to extend the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) from the Alaskan Yukon to Tierra del Fuego in Southern Chile and many American corporations are moving some production jobs to countries in Latin America. In spite of these labour trends, very little is known about the attitudes of workforces in these emerging labour markets regarding the balance between commitments to work and family. Results of research comparing work‐family orientation values among Chile, Venezuela, Mexico and the United States are presented. Implications for both researchers and managers are discussed.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Joel D. Nicholson and Yim‐Yu Wong

Considers the nature of beliefs and differentiates between three different kinds of beliefs as defined by Rokeach. Outlines the findings of a survey of business and…

Abstract

Considers the nature of beliefs and differentiates between three different kinds of beliefs as defined by Rokeach. Outlines the findings of a survey of business and economic students from a variety of countries in order to establish if work beliefs vary across nations. Suggests that there are significant differences and that future research should focus on what will motivate Western managers in the now developing information age.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Yim‐Yu Song, Thomas E. Maher, Joel D. Nicholson and Nicholas P. Gurney

Looks at the problems of logistics in military operations and today’s commercial businesses. Traces the development of logistics management from a subordinate activity…

Abstract

Looks at the problems of logistics in military operations and today’s commercial businesses. Traces the development of logistics management from a subordinate activity within a product producing entity to its performance by a separate entity which specializes in this area and requires a strategic alliance. Looks at this issue from the perspective of the outsourcing company and the logistical company. Considers what happens when this process is reversed and provides implications for the future.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jay R. Schrock, Charlie R. Adams, Joel D. Nicholson and Tim H. Dodd

The purpose of this article is to study the export strategies used by the Argentina wine industry. The implementation of export strategies is related to the comparative…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to study the export strategies used by the Argentina wine industry. The implementation of export strategies is related to the comparative advantages that Argentina has in wine‐making and wine‐exporting. Using the concept of competitive advantage, the authors found that Argentina has benefited from a low cost of production and several other strengths to develop a strong wine industry. To develop further they must minimise their weaknesses and capitalise on current opportunities.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 December 2003

Yim‐Yu Wong, Thomas E. Maher, Joel D. Nicholson and Alex Feng Bai

The transfer of technology from the foreign partner to the domestic partner has been a problem for international joint ventures throughout the world, but particularly in…

Abstract

The transfer of technology from the foreign partner to the domestic partner has been a problem for international joint ventures throughout the world, but particularly in China. Because of the nature of organisational learning, especially in its tacit forms, such transfers can occur quite subtly without the foreign partner realising what has transpired until it is too late. The problem is complicated by the fact that technology is short‐lived and must be exploited within narrow time frames, the fact that the Chinese partner’s primary interest is in acquiring the foreign partner’s technology, and the fact that the foreign partner typically shows little interest in obtaining the Chinese partner’s unique non‐technical knowledge as an offset. This article attempts to show how technology transfers can be controlled in the first place and how the foreign partner’s competitive advantage can be preserved by acquiring the domestic partner’s unique knowledge of host country circumstances.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Roblyn Simeon, Joel D. Nicholson and Yim Yu Wong

Uses the research of Dorfman and Howell’s work‐related cultural value scale to measure masculinity versus femininity across the USA, Japan and China. Attempts to contrast…

Abstract

Uses the research of Dorfman and Howell’s work‐related cultural value scale to measure masculinity versus femininity across the USA, Japan and China. Attempts to contrast gender role typing attitudes. Describes how men in each country had significantly differing attitudes to the role of women in the workforce whilst women were found to be less willing to accept roles based on gender. Highlights clear differences between each country.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Yim Yu Wong, Thomas E. Maher, Neil A. Evans and Joel D. Nicholson

Explores Chinese culture and the problems foreign firms and governments encounter when dealing with China. Emphasizes Confucianism’s dominant cultural tradition in China…

Abstract

Explores Chinese culture and the problems foreign firms and governments encounter when dealing with China. Emphasizes Confucianism’s dominant cultural tradition in China and attempts to explain it to improve foreign firms’ chances of success. Describes Confucianism as a way of living, incorporating the principles of humanism and the notion of filial piety. Mentions the five cardinal relations, harmony and Neo‐Confucianism’s “Principle of universal truth, order, law, production and reproduction”. Assesses the implications of social inequality, social ritual, familism, guan xi (connections), face, and sun yung (mutual trust) for foreign firms. Concludes that foreign firms wishing to do business with China need to understand the labyrinth of Confucianism.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Joel D. Nicholson and Lee P. Stepina

Reports on a survey of 980 Chinese, 964 Venezuelan and 1,878 US managers, professionals and business students, to examine cross‐national differences in…

Abstract

Reports on a survey of 980 Chinese, 964 Venezuelan and 1,878 US managers, professionals and business students, to examine cross‐national differences in individualism‐collectivism, masculinity‐femininity, uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and paternalism. Provides a brief overview of each country’s national characteristics. Describes the methodology used and analyses the data using multivariate analysis of variance. Records the findings for each of the categories measured – cultural values differ across the three nations but nothing startling or new is revealed. Advises that multinationals need to understand cross‐cultural values if they are to succeed in a global business environment.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Yim‐Yu Wong, Thomas E. Maher, Joel D. Nicholson and Chi‐wen Chen

Assesses the effects of the Asian economic crisis on Taiwan and identifies some reasons why it has been less dramatically affected than other Asian countries. Discusses…

Abstract

Assesses the effects of the Asian economic crisis on Taiwan and identifies some reasons why it has been less dramatically affected than other Asian countries. Discusses its actual and planned policies aimed at strengthening the economy further by maintaining currency stability, improving competitive strengths in both hi‐tech industries and manufacturing, entering new export markets, stimulating domestic demand and reforming financial institutions and regulations. Recognizes the political threats it faces but believes that increasing trade with and investment in China has reduced them.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33