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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2011

Joe Mulvihill

This paper argues the case for more mentoring and befriending projects to be set up to support older people with various levels of needs. From reducing social isolation to…

Abstract

This paper argues the case for more mentoring and befriending projects to be set up to support older people with various levels of needs. From reducing social isolation to helping with form filling, the benefits of mentoring and befriending are numerous. An introduction to mentoring and befriending is given, along with some case study examples of projects in action. A look at some of the ways befriending can be used to support older people from a new report by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation is followed by a look at some recent research, concluding with some implications for practice.

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Joe Mulvihill

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the many benefits associated with older people accessing befriending services and to increase the quantity that are set…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the many benefits associated with older people accessing befriending services and to increase the quantity that are set up and commissioned.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains a literature review: it looks into the results of two pilot projects and also features some case studies of befriending projects supporting older people.

Findings

Befriending services can be used to support older people: as a personalised form of care for those who may be isolated or lonely; to prevent the onset of dementia; to lead more active lives; and to increase the quality of their lives. Befrienders can help to spot illnesses which can prevent costly health conditions before they progress and help to reduce the burden on the National Health Service (NHS).

Research limitations/implications

The positive research results from two pilot projects are featured in the paper, which both highlight that befriending services should be available for all older people throughout the country, if they so choose.

Practical implications

The research outcomes are positive and back up the argument for the introduction of more befriending services to be available to all older people, particularly those with personal budgets. Befriending services can also lead to cost saving benefits for the NHS through the early intervention and prevention of complicated health issues and through reducing dependency on its resources too.

Social implications

Befriending services help to improve quality of life and should be more widely available to older people to access its personalised form of support and so should feature in public policy.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the role of befriending to those unsure of its meaning or role. This paper is of value to older people; local and central government; commissioners of health care; and people looking to improve the quality of life for older people.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2011

Deborah Klée

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Thomas J. Friedmann, Anthony H. Zacharski, Margaret A. Bancroft, Roger Mulvihill, Susan A. Reading, Robert J. Williams and Alan Rosenblat

The purpose of this paper is to summarize and analyze the SEC's July 9, 2008 roundtable discussion regarding fair value accounting and auditing standards.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize and analyze the SEC's July 9, 2008 roundtable discussion regarding fair value accounting and auditing standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses investor, auditor/accountant/actuary, and corporation views concerning the usefulness of fair value accounting, potential market behavior effects from fair value accounting, challenges in applying fair value standards, possible improvement to the current standards, and working with auditors who provide assurance for fair value accounting.

Findings

Some investor panelists said fair value provides investors with the most current and relevant information of any accounting method and some believe fair valuation is important for market integrity and trust because it is a transparent measure for valuation. Auditors are especially challenged in determining fair values in illiquid or frozen markets. Roundtable participants viewed disclosure as critical for implementation of fair valuation, particularly regarding key inputs and assumptions. Auditors and corporations would like more guidance on applying fair value accounting from the SEC and Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

Originality/value

The paper provides expert guidance by experienced securities lawyers.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Jonathan A. Jensen, Patrick Walsh and Joe Cobbs

The achievement of a requisite return on investment (ROI) from a brand’s investment in sponsorships of sport events is becoming increasingly important. Consequently…

Abstract

Purpose

The achievement of a requisite return on investment (ROI) from a brand’s investment in sponsorships of sport events is becoming increasingly important. Consequently, evolving trends in the consumption of the live television broadcasts of such events (e.g. increased usage of second screens by consumers) are an important consideration. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of second screen use during sport broadcast consumption on important marketing outcomes (i.e. brand awareness and the perceived value and intrusiveness of sponsor brand integration), and whether effectiveness is dependent on the consumer’s level of identification with the sport being broadcast.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2×2 (experimental/control and high SportID/low SportID) between-subjects experimental design featuring the broadcast of a sport event as the stimuli was utilized to examine a potential interaction effect between sport identification and second screen use on three dependent variables important for sport sponsors.

Findings

Results confirmed that those with a high level of sport identification realized significantly higher levels of brand awareness for sponsors integrated into the broadcast. However, when consumers were asked to engage in second screen use, the experiment revealed a moderating effect of sport identification on the impact of second screen use, for both brand awareness and the perceived value of the brand integration.

Originality/value

Consumers with higher levels of sport identification are an important target of sport sponsorship activities by brand marketers. Given this, the implication that second screen use can reduce the effectiveness of important sponsorship-related outcomes such as brand awareness is a sobering result for marketers expecting a positive ROI from sponsorships of sport events.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Jean J. Schensul, Kim Radda, Margaret Weeks and Scott Clair

This paper compares older drug users' exposure to HIV infection or to infecting others with the HIV virus to that of their younger counterparts and addresses the extent to…

Abstract

This paper compares older drug users' exposure to HIV infection or to infecting others with the HIV virus to that of their younger counterparts and addresses the extent to which their personal networks, and the macro-networks within which they use drugs, play a role in risk exposure or prevention. We first consider the changing epidemiology of HIV with respect to older adults. Next we utilize two separate but related sets of data to determine if older drug users are at greater risk than their younger counterparts for drug and sex related HIV risk and also whether or not their knowledge base is sufficiently adequate to enable them to make appropriate decisions about HIV related risk avoidance. We then examine the role of social networks in enhancing or reducing risk of HIV infection in older and younger drug users. Finally we consider the position of both sero-positive and sero-negative older drug users in macro-networks of drug users and whether or not their positions increase or reduce their risk of exposure.

Details

Social Networks and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-152-1

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