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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Dana E. Harrison, O.C. Ferrell, Linda Ferrell and Joe F. Hair, Jr

The purpose of this paper is to theoretically develop and empirically validate separate scales that represent a consumer’s expectations of business ethics (BE) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to theoretically develop and empirically validate separate scales that represent a consumer’s expectations of business ethics (BE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review and qualitative research were conducted to generate items for the scales. Initial item reduction was performed qualitatively based on a panel of experts. A follow-up quantitative assessment using an exploratory factor analysis further reduced the items. The scales were then validated using confirmatory composite analysis with partial least squares-structural equation modeling.

Findings

Separate scales representing consumers’ expectations of BE and CSR behaviors were developed. The scales exhibited reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity and external validity.

Practical implications

The separation of these scales into two components will facilitate more precise examination of consumer perceptions of these two components of product and brand images, and how they may impact brand attitudes and brand trust.

Originality/value

This is the first effort to develop separate scales for consumer expectations of ethics and CSR, and assess their impact on brand outcomes.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Joe F. Hair Jr

The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of emerging prediction assessment tools for composite-based PLS-SEM, particularly proposed out-of-sample prediction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of emerging prediction assessment tools for composite-based PLS-SEM, particularly proposed out-of-sample prediction methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of recently developed out-of-sample prediction assessment tools for composite-based PLS-SEM that will expand the skills of researchers and inform them on new methodologies for improving evaluation of theoretical models. Recently developed and proposed cross-validation approaches for model comparisons and benchmarking are reviewed and evaluated.

Findings

The results summarize next-generation prediction metrics that will substantially improve researchers' ability to assess and report the extent to which their theoretical models provide meaningful predictions. Improved prediction assessment metrics are essential to justify (practical) implications and recommendations developed on the basis of theoretical model estimation results.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of recently developed and proposed out-of-sample prediction metrics for composite-based PLS-SEM that will enhance the ability of researchers to demonstrate generalization of their findings from sample data to the population.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Joe Hair, Carole L. Hollingsworth, Adriane B. Randolph and Alain Yee Loong Chong

Following the call for awareness of accepted reporting practices by Ringle, Sarstedt, and Straub in 2012, the purpose of this paper is to review and analyze the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

Following the call for awareness of accepted reporting practices by Ringle, Sarstedt, and Straub in 2012, the purpose of this paper is to review and analyze the use of partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) in Industrial Management & Data Systems (IMDS) and extend MIS Quarterly (MISQ) applications to include the period 2012-2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of PLS-SEM applications in information systems (IS) studies published in IMDS and MISQ for the period 2010-2014 identifying a total of 57 articles reporting the use of or commenting on PLS-SEM.

Findings

The results indicate an increased maturity of the IS field in using PLS-SEM for model complexity and formative measures and not just small sample sizes and non-normal data.

Research limitations/implications

Findings demonstrate the continued use and acceptance of PLS-SEM as an accepted research method within IS. PLS-SEM is discussed as the preferred SEM method when the research objective is prediction.

Practical implications

This update on PLS-SEM use and recent developments will help authors to better understand and apply the method. Researchers are encouraged to engage in complete reporting procedures.

Originality/value

Applications of PLS-SEM for exploratory research and theory development are increasing. IS scholars should continue to exercise sound practice by reporting reasons for using PLS-SEM and recognizing its wider applicability for research. Recommended reporting guidelines following Ringle et al. (2012) and Gefen et al. (2011) are included. Several important methodological updates are included as well.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Content available

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Anita Whiting, David L. Williams and Joe Hair

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Lauren L. Rich, James Rich and Joe Hair

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a model of organizational culture capable of more strongly predicting individual work behavior. For this purpose, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a model of organizational culture capable of more strongly predicting individual work behavior. For this purpose, the authors integrate the organizational culture profile (OCP) with two independent theories – regulatory focus theory and the theory of basic values.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from 22 US public accounting firms. Partial least squares confirmatory composite analysis was used to test the theoretical structure and measurement metrics of the proposed factors.

Findings

The results support that the influence of organizational culture can be conceptualized consistent with a regulatory focus framework. The findings of our research indicate that promotion-focused culture is distinct from prevention-focused culture.

Practical implications

The results raise questions about the common practice across existing person-organization fit research of expecting generic effects across all seven OCP dimensions when predicting individual behaviors. Moreover, empirical evidence for the separate higher-order cultural dimensions supports the conclusion that the OCP’s seven dimensions reflect different underlying motivations likely important in predicting individual work behavior.

Originality/value

This study is the first to not only provide a confirmatory composite analysis of the measure of culture based on the OCP’s original seven cultural dimensions, but also examine the motivational properties of organizational culture through a regulatory focus framework.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Joe Hair, Bob Wood and Alex Sharland

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the variables that drive the rating within the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) list. The list is used in so many…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the variables that drive the rating within the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) list. The list is used in so many different ways throughout academic research that a better understanding of its component parts is essential.

Design/methodology/approach

The 2016 list was used as a base and additional variables added. The resulting database was subjected to statistical analysis using the PLS methodology.

Findings

The overall finding is that the most significant driver of the ratings system is the impact factor. When this number is not available, the Cabell’s rating may be a weaker proxy.

Research limitations/implications

The researchers used a set of additional variables that were limited in nature. Other variables not included in the study may be included in later work and be found to have some correlation with the ABDC rating.

Originality/value

Given the use of the ABDC list and the paucity of work in this area, the reported research may have significant value; especially for authors working in areas where journals are “crossover” in nature.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Anita Whiting, David L. Williams and Joe Hair

The purpose of this study is to investigate motives for engaging in electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about organizations on social media sites. This study explores motives…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate motives for engaging in electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about organizations on social media sites. This study explores motives for posting positive eWOM and motives for posting negative eWOM. It also investigates whether existing WOM frameworks adequately capture consumers’ motives for spreading eWOM within the context of social media. This study seeks to confirm established motives in literature while also identifying new motives specific to social media.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted using the critical incident technique. In all, 64 positive incidents and 60 negative incidents were analyzed.

Findings

This study provides a typology for understanding consumers’ motivations for engaging in positive and negative WOM within the context of social media. Four new motives for sharing eWOM are identified; eight established WOM motives are re-confirmed; and new subcategories for eWOM motives are proposed. The study also finds that further refinement of WOM motives and scales within a social media context is needed.

Research limitations/implications

An integrated conceptual framework of both positive and negative motives is developed to illustrate a more comprehensive model of motives of eWOM within social media. Managerial implications for managing negative eWOM and amplifying positive eWOM are discussed. A limitation is that the study is exploratory in nature.

Originality/value

This study identifies new motives for sharing eWOM, re-labels existing WOM and eWOM motives with more descriptive and comprehensive titles and confirms established WOM and eWOM motives within the context of social media. This study is conducted across multiple firms and industries, leading to more generalizable results.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Anita Whiting, David Williams and Joe F. Hair

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

1 – 10 of 345