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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Joe Follman

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the first ten years of research on the Bottom (or Base) of the Pyramid (BoP) strategy of providing products and services to billions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the first ten years of research on the Bottom (or Base) of the Pyramid (BoP) strategy of providing products and services to billions of the world's poor. Conceptions of BoP have shifted significantly, but the nature and implications of these shifts have not been adequately explored. The paper asks: What is the present conception of BoP, how and why has it evolved since 2002, and what are differences and concordances between first‐ and second‐generation understandings? What would an integrative perspective on BoP include, and how can it be applied?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review of peer‐reviewed journal articles and books on BoP.

Findings

It is found that ten years of research have rapidly advanced the definition of BoP, from a way for multinational corporations to profit by selling to the poor to how collaborative networks – including local firms and NGOs – engage with the poor to design, produce, distribute, and sell goods and services. An emerging consensus is that successful BoP ventures must use an integrative approach in key areas: understanding distinctions among poverty levels, focusing on BoP need to create customized products and services at low prices, collaboration with local organizations, engagement of BoP populations as producers and not just consumers, and applying a reciprocal shared value concept (Porter and Kramer) to ensure products and services provide real economic and social benefits to both the company and members of the BoP.

Originality/value

The paper's suggested integrative approach reframes the BoP discussion as a meso approach of using effective strategies in complementary ways, as does the application of the shared value framework for BoP initiatives.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Latisha Reynolds, Samantha McClellan, Susan Finley, George Martinez and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of…

4495

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and IL published in 2015.

Findings

This paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain either unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and IL.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Miriam Borchardt, Giancarlo Pereira, Alexandre Rodrigues Ferreira, Marcela Soares, Josiano Sousa and Daniel Battaglia

This paper aims to analyse the factors that influence frugal innovation (FI) in micro- and small enterprises (MSEs) at the base of the pyramid (BOP) through the theoretical lens…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the factors that influence frugal innovation (FI) in micro- and small enterprises (MSEs) at the base of the pyramid (BOP) through the theoretical lens of dynamic capabilities. The input–process–output (I-P-O) framework was used as a tool to support the analysis of FI as a process.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study was performed with 25 MSEs at the BOP in Brazil, all of which were in the food industry.

Findings

This study indicates that dynamic capabilities are present in enterprises that are migrating to low income and middle-class consumers, which influences their FI practices. To analyse FI in the context of MSEs at the BOP, the I-P-O framework was adapted. Enterprises that have focussed on extremely poor and subsistence markets develop more disruptive innovation, aiming to reduce the final prices they charge consumers. The primary focus of these enterprises is on maintaining ordinary capabilities. Enterprises that have focussed on low income and middle-class customers have implemented incremental innovation, adding value based on colonial tastes and close relationships with their consumers. Such a strategy demands changes in the physical facilities, use of social media and investment in quality control of these enterprises. Considerations for policymakers and institutions are also presented.

Originality/value

The use of a dynamic capabilities lens in such a context is a new approach and provides a relevant basis for further studies. The study has identified different approaches to FI and different sets of barriers and successful practices, both related to the target market segment, that could leverage FI. This study contributes to case studies from Brazil, spreading the research context beyond Asia.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Robert James Thomas, Gareth Reginald Terence White and Anthony Samuel

The purpose of this research is to understand what motivates 7–11-year-old children to participate in online brand communities (OBCs). Prior research has concentrated on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand what motivates 7–11-year-old children to participate in online brand communities (OBCs). Prior research has concentrated on prescriptive product categories (games and gaming), predominantly adolescent groups and the social aspects of community engagement and actual behaviour within communities, rather than the motivations to participate with the OBC. This has ultimately limited what has been gleaned, both theoretically and managerially, from this important segment.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive, longitudinal position is adopted, using a sample of 261 children (113 male and 148 female) from across the UK, using event-based diaries over a 12-month period, generating 2,224 entries.

Findings

Data indicate that children are motivated to participate in a brand community for four reasons: to support and ameliorate pre-purchase anxieties, resolve interpersonal conflicts, exact social dominance in terms of product ownership and perceptions of product knowledge and to actively engage in digitalised pester power. The study also reveals that certain motivational aspects such as conflict resolution and exacting dominance, are gender-specific.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge of children’s motivation to engage with OBCs is important for marketers and brand managers alike as the data reveal markedly different stimuli when compared to known adult behaviours in the field. Given the nature of the study, scope exists for significant future research.

Practical implications

The study reveals behaviours that will assist brand managers in further understanding the complex and untraditional relationships that children have with brands and OBCs.

Originality/value

This study makes a novel examination of a hitherto little-explored segment of consumers. In doing so, it uncovers the theoretical and practical characteristics of child consumers that contemporary, adult-focussed literature does not recognise. The paper makes an additional contribution to theory by positing four new behavioural categories relating to community engagement – dependers, defusers, demanders and dominators – and four new motivational factors which are fundamentally different from adult taxonomies – social hegemony, parental persuasion, dilemma solving and conflict resolution.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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