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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Joe Christopher, Sarath Ukwatte and Prem Yapa

This study aims to examine how government policies have influenced the governance paradigm of Australian public universities from a historical perspective. In doing so, it…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how government policies have influenced the governance paradigm of Australian public universities from a historical perspective. In doing so, it addresses current uncertainty on government-governance connectivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on Foucault’s concept of governmentality and governance and uses a developed framework of three constituents of governance to explore government–governance connectivity through a critical discourse analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that government policies have influenced the three constituents of governance differently since 1823, resulting in three distinct governance discourses. In the third governance discourse, the findings reveal a deviation from policy directions towards corporate managerialism, resulting in a hybrid governance control environment. This scenario has arisen due to internal stakeholders continuing to be oriented towards the previous management cultures. Other factors include structural and legalistic obstacles to the implementation of corporate managerialism, validity of the underlying theory informing the policy directions towards corporate managerialism and doubts on the achievability of the market based reforms associated with corporate managerialism. The totality of these factors suggests a theory practice gap to be confirmed through further empirical research. There are also policy implications for policymakers to recognize the hybrid control environment and ascertain the risk the hybrid control environment poses towards the expected outcomes of corporate managerialism.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to a critical discourse analysis of data from specific policies and journal publications on higher education and a developed framework of constituents of governance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine government–governance connectivity in Australian public universities and also the first to introduce a three-constituent governance framework as a conduit to explore such studies. The findings contribute to the literature in identifying a theory-practice gap and offer opportunities for further research to confirm them.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2020

Joe Christopher

The aim of this paper is to examine how performance management (PM) is adopted in the public university sector and the problems it faces in an environment of conflicting…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine how performance management (PM) is adopted in the public university sector and the problems it faces in an environment of conflicting management cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on institutional logics as a theoretical framework and inductive qualitative interviews as a research approach.

Findings

The results reveal that the conflicting values instilled in key players aligned with the different cultures have resulted in PM assuming a hybrid form, rather than the corporate form. Three identified problematic factors further demonstrate that the level of hybridity varies across the sector. The paper alludes to a theory-practice gap as a result of the findings and the concept of negative hybridity and its risk to effective governance aligned with the corporate approach.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited to Australian public universities. In addition, interviews were conducted with a specific set of university management staff. A different perspective on the findings may have been generated with a different set of management or operational staff.

Practical implications

The results provide policymakers and university management with information on the theory practice gap and the problematic factors contributing to it. It also informs policymakers to the risks associated with negative hybridity.

Originality/value

The results reveal the existence of a theory–practice gap because of a number of common problematic factors in the adoption of a corporate-oriented PM system in Australian public universities. The results highlight the need for further studies to establish the extent to which the current hybrid PM system deviates from the expected corporate-oriented PM system, and whether this poses a risk to effective governance aligned with the corporate approach.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2009

Joe Christopher, Gerrit Sarens and Philomena Leung

This study aims to critically analyse the independence of the internal audit function through its relationship with management and the audit committee.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to critically analyse the independence of the internal audit function through its relationship with management and the audit committee.

Design/methodology/approach

Results are based on a critical comparison of responses from questionnaires sent out to Australian chief audit executives (CAEs) versus existing literature and best practice guidelines.

Findings

With respect to the internal audit function's relationship with management, threats identified include: using the internal audit function as a stepping stone to other positions; having the chief executive officer (CEO) or chief finance officer (CFO) approve the internal audit function's budget and provide input for the internal audit plan; and considering the internal auditor to be a “partner”, especially when combined with other indirect threats. With respect to the relationship with the audit committee, significant threats identified include CAEs not reporting functionally to the audit committee; the audit committee not having sole responsibility for appointing, dismissing and evaluating the CAE; and not having all audit committee members or at least one member qualified in accounting.

Originality/value

This study introduces independence threat scores, thereby generating analysis of the internal audit function's independence taking into account a combination of threats.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Gerrit Sarens and Joe Christopher

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the weaker focus on risk management and internal control within the Belgian corporate governance guidelines is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the weaker focus on risk management and internal control within the Belgian corporate governance guidelines is associated with less developed risk management and internal control systems within Belgian companies, when compared to Australian companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical arguments were drawn from institutional theory. Data for the study were collected through a questionnaire that was sent out to chief audit executives in Australia and Belgium.

Findings

The paper finds that the weaker focus of the Belgian corporate governance guidelines on risk management and internal control is associated with less developed risk management and internal control systems in Belgian companies than in Australian companies.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on corporate governance, as it suggests that the specific content of corporate governance guidelines is an important variable to take into account. This paper also confirms that institutional theory is a relevant framework to study on the one hand, corporate governance practices in a “comply or explain” context, and on the other hand, corporate governance practices within unlisted companies.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Kathleen Heim

The dismissal of the ordinary and the embrace of chaos are characteristics of the thriller which has, over the last decade, accounted for nearly 25 percent of the…

Abstract

The dismissal of the ordinary and the embrace of chaos are characteristics of the thriller which has, over the last decade, accounted for nearly 25 percent of the best‐seller market. In spite of its existential overtones, the thriller, with rare exceptions, is seldom viewed as quality fiction, yet is not generally classified as genre fiction with attendant categorization by libraries and bookstores. Readers of thrillers in pursuit of authors must either search through the general fiction or “mystery” shelves where thrillers are sometimes placed. However, the latter solution offends both mystery and thriller readers.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Marcie Beard

Many bibliographies of books about C.S. Lewis' works and life have been compiled in the past, but a bibliography of recent literary criticism addressing Lewis and his work…

Abstract

Purpose

Many bibliographies of books about C.S. Lewis' works and life have been compiled in the past, but a bibliography of recent literary criticism addressing Lewis and his work is hard to come by. The purpose of this paper is to provide a bibliography of the best works recently published about C.S. Lewis and his writings.

Design/methodology/approach

Many different sources were used to find current popular works about C.S. Lewis and his writings. The author searched several databases, read several book reviews, and looked through the source itself when available in order to compile an annotated list of current works, which are viewed to be important additions to the literature about C.S. Lewis and his works.

Practical implications

The resulting bibliography is not a complete list of everything written about C.S. Lewis in the past few years. Instead, the intent is to compile a research guide of the sources considered to be the most useful contributions to the works about C.S. Lewis that already exist.

Findings

Included in this research guide is a list of quality biographies and literary criticism found in reference sources; a sample of book‐length resources focusing on Lewis' life, thought, and writings; short descriptions of periodicals that frequently discuss Lewis' work; and examples of popular databases and web resources dedicated to C.S. Lewis.

Originality/value

In addition to being intended for students, faculty, and those of the general public who are interested in reading about or doing research on C.S. Lewis and his works, this guide is designed for librarians who are trying to develop, maintain, or evaluate a collection on the topic.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Joseph C. Santora, Rosemary A. Clemens and James C. Sarros

Investigates the issue of succession planning and implementation for chief executive officers (CEOs) at philanthropic organizations. Provides a description, definition and…

Abstract

Investigates the issue of succession planning and implementation for chief executive officers (CEOs) at philanthropic organizations. Provides a description, definition and classification for philanthropic organizations: family, operating, community, and company‐sponsored. Selects four foundation CEOs representing some of the four types noted in the typology for research. Gives them the same case study to review, read, and respond to five questions targeted to the case study and to their foundation’s philosophy of succession planning. Discusses unique features and uncovers similar features and analyses reactions. Suggests that no foundation CEO interviewees had experience with succession planning or felt the choices in the study appropriate. Also identifies the need to study the process of grant awarding to uncover additional aspects related to understanding power, leadership, and influence in foundations’ policies for choosing leadership and transferring authority in a planned way.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Kemi Salawu Anazodo, Rose Ricciardelli and Christopher Chan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social stigmatization of the formerly incarcerated identity and how this affects employment post-release. The authors consider…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social stigmatization of the formerly incarcerated identity and how this affects employment post-release. The authors consider the characteristics of this identity and the identity management strategies that individuals draw from as they navigate employment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 men at various stages of release from federal institutions in Canada. Participants were actively searching for employment, intending to or would consider searching for employment, or had searched for employment in the past post-incarceration. Participant data were simultaneously collected, coded and analyzed using an inductive approach (Gioia et al., 2012).

Findings

Formerly incarcerated individuals have a unique awareness of the social stigmatization associated with their criminal record and incarceration history. They are tasked with an intentional choice to disclose or conceal that identity throughout the employment process. Six identity management strategies emerged from their accounts: conditional disclosure, deflection, identity substitution, defying expectations, withdrawal and avoidance strategies. More specifically, distinct implications of criminal record and incarceration history on disclosure decisions were evident. Based on participants’ accounts of their reintegration experiences, four aspects that may inform disclosure decisions include: opportune timing, interpersonal dynamics, criminal history and work ethic.

Originality/value

The authors explore the formerly incarcerated identity as a socially stigmatized identity and consider how individuals manage this identity within the employment context. The authors identify incarceration history and criminal record as having distinct impacts on experiences of stigma and identity management strategic choice, thus representing the experience of a “double stigma”.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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