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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 May 2023

Jodi Eirich and Jane Wildesen

The purpose of this paper is to describe a thriving partnership between Frostburg State University and the Garrett County Public Schools that aims to improve teacher effectiveness…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a thriving partnership between Frostburg State University and the Garrett County Public Schools that aims to improve teacher effectiveness and retention through the implementation of a robust induction program. The initiative includes sustained, strategic mentoring; extensive professional development; and validated, competency-based microcredentials aligned to high-leverage practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study included surveys and structured interviews with teaching fellows and their instructional coaches.

Findings

Having ample support and mentoring can make a significant difference for novice teachers. Partnerships between universities and local school districts can provide this critical support.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation that cannot be ignored is the small number of participants in this program, all of whom are teaching in a rural school system. However, researchers working with larger school districts would add valuable knowledge to the field of study.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications for designing new induction programs or improving existing ones.

Social implications

Mentoring, a major component of high-quality induction programs, has the potential of providing important benefits to beginning teachers including increased motivation, self-confidence, growth in professional identity, and reduced stress and anxiety.

Originality/value

As school systems are struggling to retain qualified teachers, high-quality induction programs are necessary.

Details

PDS Partners: Bridging Research to Practice, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2833-2040

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2024

Jenna Epstein, Jodi Eirich and Jane Wildesen

The purpose of this study was to examine how beginning teachers’ participation in a microcredential based on trauma-informed classroom management and restorative discipline…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine how beginning teachers’ participation in a microcredential based on trauma-informed classroom management and restorative discipline (TIMRD) practices might enhance their self-efficacy (SE), through an understanding of their own trauma response, its neurobiological basis and classroom interventions that focus on student wellness and teacher self-care.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a single case study design, participants completed a pre- and post-assessment before and after completion of a TIMRD microcredential.

Findings

A total of seven teaching fellows completed the microcredential process. Results indicate that the use of a microcredential for professional learning assisted with decreasing sense of burnout while increasing professional SE, SE related to classroom management and instructional strategies (ISs).

Originality/value

New teachers commonly struggle with a lack of professional efficacy for a variety of reasons, yet all teachers present with their own personal trauma. Increasing new teachers’ sense of resilience through addressing their own trauma and the impact of student trauma is integral to increasing teaching SE and reducing rates of burnout.

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