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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Mark N.K. Saunders

In recent years separate bodies of literature on vacancynotification and employee mobility have evolved for Migration and HumanResource Management specialisms. Whilst the…

Abstract

In recent years separate bodies of literature on vacancy notification and employee mobility have evolved for Migration and Human Resource Management specialisms. Whilst the foci of these investigations have had much in common, examination of the literature suggests that many authors appear to have limited knowledge of the work undertaken outside their specialism. Concentrates on those two aspects of the recruitment process where integration of the literature is likely to be of most benefit: vacancy notification and subsequent employee mobility. Compares and contrasts the specialisms′ approaches to examining the recruitment process and highlights a series of issues where knowledge and understanding of how these aspects of the labour market operate is limited. These include the use of information channels, the impact of labour market factors on employee mobility and the ability of incentives to overcome employee inertia.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Sisay Adugna Chala, Fazel Ansari, Madjid Fathi and Kea Tijdens

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework of an automatic bidirectional matching system that measures the degree of semantic similarity of job-seeker…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework of an automatic bidirectional matching system that measures the degree of semantic similarity of job-seeker qualifications and skills, against the vacancy provided by employers or job-agents.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a framework of bidirectional jobseeker-to-vacancy matching system. Using occupational data from various sources such as the WageIndicator web survey, International Standard Classification of Occupations, European Skills, Competences, Qualifications, and Occupations as well as vacancy data from various open access internet sources and job seekers information from social networking sites, the authors apply machine learning techniques for bidirectional matching of job vacancies and occupational standards to enhance the contents of job vacancies and job seekers profiles. The authors also apply bidirectional matching of job seeker profiles and vacancies, i.e., semantic matching vacancies to job seekers and vice versa in the individual level. Moreover, data from occupational standards and social networks were utilized to enhance the relevance (i.e. degree of similarity) of job vacancies and job seekers, respectively.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights of increase in job vacancy advertisements on the selected jobs – Internet of Things – with respect to other job vacancies, and identifies the evolution of job profiles and its effect on job vacancies announcements in the era of Industry 4.0. In addition, the paper shows the gap between job seeker interests and available jobs in the selected job area.

Research limitations/implications

Due to limited data about jobseekers, the research results may not guarantee high quality of recommendation and maturity of matching results. Therefore, further research is required to test if the proposed system works for other domains as well as more diverse data sets.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates how online jobseeker-to-vacancy matching can be improved by use of semantic technology and the integration of occupational standards, web survey data, and social networking data into user profile collection and matching.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Matthew Bidwell

Mobility processes, the routines that organizations use to move employees into and across jobs, are a critical determinant of the way that human capital is allocated…

Abstract

Mobility processes, the routines that organizations use to move employees into and across jobs, are a critical determinant of the way that human capital is allocated within organizations and careers developed. Most existing work on these mobility processes has examined processes in which mobility is tightly coupled to the filling of vacancies. There is substantial evidence, though, that many organizations adopt very different processes for managing mobility. In this theory chapter, I compare vacancy-based, “job-pull” systems with alternative, “person-push” systems in which mobility is keyed to employees' attainment of performance and skill thresholds to explain how and why mobility processes vary. I identify two, inter-related dimensions along which mobility processes vary: whether their decision processes emphasize the need to match employees to tasks versus providing predictable rewards; and whether the system of jobs that people move between prioritizes flexibility or control of agency costs. I use these dimensions to predict when organizations will adopt different mobility processes, and how those processes will affect employees' mobility.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Kea Tijdens, Miroslav Beblavý and Anna Thum-Thysen

The purpose of this paper is to overcome the problems that skill mismatch cannot be measured directly and that demand side data are lacking. It relates demand and supply…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to overcome the problems that skill mismatch cannot be measured directly and that demand side data are lacking. It relates demand and supply side characteristics by aggregating data from jobs ads and jobholders into occupations. For these occupations skill mismatch is investigated by focussing on demand and supply ratios, attained vis-à-vis required skills and vacancies’ skill requirements in relation to the demand-supply ratios.

Design/methodology/approach

Vacancy data from the EURES job portal and jobholder data from WageIndicator web-survey were aggregated by ISCO 4-digit occupations and merged in a database with 279 occupations for Czech Republic, being the only European country with disaggregated occupational data, coded educational data, and sufficient numbers of observations.

Findings

One fourth of occupations are in excessive demand and one third in excessive supply. The workforce is overeducated compared to the vacancies’ requirements. A high demand correlates with lower educational requirements. At lower occupational skill levels requirements are more condensed, but attainments less so. At higher skill levels, requirements are less condensed, but attainments more so. Educational requirements are lower for high demand occupations.

Research limitations/implications

Using educational levels is a limited proxy for multidimensional skills. Higher educated jobholders are overrepresented.

Practical implications

In Europe labour market mismatches worry policy makers and Public Employment Services alike.

Originality/value

The authors study is the first for Europe to explore such a granulated approach of skill mismatch.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Richard N.S. Robinson, Charles V. Arcodia, Christina Tian and Phillip Charlton

Cookery has been identified as an occupation with skills shortages, at least in the developed world. There is currently a dearth of research into the cookery labour…

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Abstract

Purpose

Cookery has been identified as an occupation with skills shortages, at least in the developed world. There is currently a dearth of research into the cookery labour market, its occupational culture and characteristics. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a tracking approach to collate and investigate aspects of electronically‐listed job advertisements for cookery‐related vacancies in Australia's northern state of Queensland. Content analysis of advertised employment vacancies has previously been utilised as a method in tourism and hospitality research.

Findings

The findings support the proposition that industry demand exceeds labour supply. Moreover, the content analysis of the vacancies' characteristics suggest that a range of job advertisement details, including remuneration, is infrequently supplied.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited in scope to cookery‐related vacancies and to those advertised for Queensland. Accounting for vacancy duplications and consequential vacancies were the two key analytical challenges. Future research with refined instruments and more generalisable samples is invited.

Originality/value

The study reveals that the increased electronicisation of information facilitates both the collection and generation of labour market research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

James Jolly, Stephen Creigh and Alan Mingay

The United States has attempted to remove the comparative disadvantage of people over 40 in the labour market by legislation against any age discrimination in the…

Abstract

The United States has attempted to remove the comparative disadvantage of people over 40 in the labour market by legislation against any age discrimination in the employment of people aged between 40 and 70, including the prohibition of age qualifications in job advertisements. This paper discusses the main provisions of the American Age Discrimination in Employment Act (1967 and 1973) and then goes on to consider the extent of age discrimination in Britain by analysing a sample of age qualified vacancies notified to the British public employment service.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Daniel Gomes and José Neves

This paper aims to clarify the process that leads prospective applicants to apply for a job vacancy when one is being evaluated. It proposes that prospective applicants…

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10556

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the process that leads prospective applicants to apply for a job vacancy when one is being evaluated. It proposes that prospective applicants evaluate a job vacancy based on the characteristics of the job and the organizational attributes. This will determine organizational attractiveness perception, and will result in the intention to apply for a job vacancy.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted employment ad that described a job and an organization were presented to 51 marketing professionals and to 73 undergraduate marketing students, who were asked to respond to a questionnaire that contained the measures of the study variables. The hypotheses were tested using linear regression methodology.

Findings

Organizational attractiveness fully mediates the relations between the job characteristics and the organizational attributes with intention to apply for a job vacancy. Analysis over the compared importance of each factor has outlined the major importance of the organizational attributes and feedback of the job for determining this process.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should clarify the role of organizational image as an employer and organizational familiarity in this process.

Practical implications

Recruitment messages in employment ads should place preferential focus on the elements of organization attributes and feedback of the job. These elements will more strongly determine attractiveness perception, and consequentially, predict intention to apply to a job vacancy.

Originality/value

The study clarifies the role of organizational attractiveness in the process that leads to intention to apply for a job vacancy. A significant part of the proposed model was based on clues retrieved from existing research.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Pablo de Pedraza, Kea Tijdens and Stefano Visintin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the matching process before and after the Great Recession in the Netherlands. The Dutch case is interesting because it is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the matching process before and after the Great Recession in the Netherlands. The Dutch case is interesting because it is characterised by increasing matching efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses data from 2001 to 2014 to study the Dutch labour market matching process accounting for the three labour market states and their heterogeneities.

Findings

The elasticity of hires with respect to the short-term employed was significant, positive and countercyclical, while elasticities relating to new entrants were procyclical. The matching function (MF) displays constant returns to scale (CRTS) when using an alternative labour supply (LS) measure that includes the short-term employed as jobseekers. The findings are at odds with the idea of mismatch and a shortage of skills. Search frictions for employers were lower and vacancies were filled faster. This can be related to the fact that in a loose labour market context with increasing short-term employment, employers increase their hiring of employed workers which generates negative externalities on unemployed.

Originality/value

The implications concern the specification of the MF and the CRTS assumption when using unemployment as a LS measure.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Geraint Johnes

A study of training opportunities in the Lancaster and Morecambearea of north‐west England is undertaken. In common with much of the UK,there is a substantial degree of…

Abstract

A study of training opportunities in the Lancaster and Morecambe area of north‐west England is undertaken. In common with much of the UK, there is a substantial degree of mismatch between skills possessed by job seekers and those sought by firms. Training facilities offered by firms in the area are good. Over 80 per cent of vacancies in manufacturing are for jobs where the employer offers some kind of training for new employees. The most common forms of training are on‐the‐job, though more formal schemes are also widely used in certain occupations.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Pablo de Pedraza, Martin Guzi and Kea Tijdens

Di Tella et al. (2001) show that temporary fluctuations in life satisfaction (LS) are correlated with macroeconomic circumstances such as gross domestic product…

Abstract

Purpose

Di Tella et al. (2001) show that temporary fluctuations in life satisfaction (LS) are correlated with macroeconomic circumstances such as gross domestic product, unemployment and inflation. In this paper, we bring attention to labour market measures from search and matching models (Pissarides 2000).

Design/methodology/approach

Our analysis follows the two-stage estimation strategy used in Di Tella et al. (2001) to explore sectoral unemployment levels, labour market tightness and matching efficiency as LS determinants. In the first stage, we use a large sample of individual data collected from a continuous web survey during the 2007–2014 period in the Netherlands to obtain regression-adjusted measures of LS by quarter and economic sector. In the second-stage, we regress LS measures against the unemployment level, labour market tightness and matching efficiency.

Findings

Our results are threefold. First, the negative link between unemployment and an employee's LS is confirmed at the sectoral level. Second, labour market tightness, measured as the number of vacancies per job-seeker rather than the number of vacancies per unemployed, is shown to be relevant to the LS of workers. Third, labour market matching efficiency affects the LS of workers differently when they are less satisfied with their job and in temporary employment.

Originality/value

No evidence of this relationship has been documented before. Our results give support to government interventions aimed at activating demand for labour, improving the matching of job-seekers to vacant jobs and reducing information frictions by supporting match-making technologies.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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