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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Inge Sieben and Andries de Grip

Analyses whether the participation of workers in general, sector‐specific, and firm‐specific training affects their expectations on job mobility within or outside the call…

2643

Abstract

Analyses whether the participation of workers in general, sector‐specific, and firm‐specific training affects their expectations on job mobility within or outside the call centres sector. Distinguishes between the perceived difficulty to find an equally attractive job and the inclination to quit for another job. Employing data on 525 call centre agents working in eight call centres in The Netherlands, finds that training does not significantly affect the perceived labour market perspectives of call centre agents, nor influence expected job mobility inside or outside the sector. The inclination to quit the present job within two years is the same for agents with and without training. There is one exception, however. Agents who followed firm‐specific training significantly less often considered quitting for a job in another call centre. All this is good news for firms offering training. Another finding, however, might be more problematic. The work experience of agents positively affects their labour market perspectives inside the sector. In addition, agents with more experience are more inclined to quit for a job in another call centre. This means that firms need to keep their employees satisfied.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2003

Mary Ellen Boyle and Janet Boguslaw

Job training, as traditionally conceptualized, is intended to improve the employment and earnings of disadvantaged individuals. Both theory and practice have approached…

Abstract

Job training, as traditionally conceptualized, is intended to improve the employment and earnings of disadvantaged individuals. Both theory and practice have approached the problem by segmenting the roles and responsibilities of the key stakeholders: the individual, the employer, and civil society. Such segmentation is problematic because it removes stakeholders from their contexts, and ignores the holistic and complex nature of the underlying problems and their remedies. Reframed as a form of business and community development, job training can focus on capacity building, stakeholder involvement, and expanded notions of skill achievement and geographic scope, thereby addressing stakeholder interests in context. The three cases presented in this chapter describe such reframing: from increasing human capital to building human capacity; from a partnership or individual business focus to a multi-stakeholder approach; and from job and employer-specific skill development to that which is multi-phased and geographically dispersed. Complexity theory will be used to explain these developments.

Details

The Sociology of Job Training
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-886-6

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Mensah Prince Osiesi, Victor Tobiloba Odobe, Kamorudeen Taiwo Sanni, Adijat Bolanle Adams, Chigozie Celestina Oke, Udukhomose Suleiman Omokhabi and Nnaemeka Chijioke Okorie

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of professional training and development for librarians/library staff in the southwest, Nigeria; especially the Federal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of professional training and development for librarians/library staff in the southwest, Nigeria; especially the Federal University of OyeEkiti, Nigeria. Thus, this study intends to assess the impact of staff professional development and training on the job performance of library staff in the Federal University Oye Ekiti, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was used in carrying out this study. The population of study cuts across all library staff/attendants in the Federal University Oye Ekiti departmental, faculty and the university libraries. The purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the sample for the study (77 library staff). Research instruments, developed by the researchers, Staff Development Programme Questionnaire (r = 0.79), Staff performance Questionnaire (r = 0.81), Challenges of Staff Professional Development and Training Questionnaire (r = 0.82), were used for data collection. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency counts and percentages, mean and standard deviation) and inference statistics (correlation and one-way ANOVA) at a 5% level of significance.

Findings

Results revealed that the level of the job performance of library staff in Federal University Oye-Ekiti (FUOYE) is high; there is a positive and statistically significant relationship between the professional development of library staff and their performance in the job; professional development and training of library staff significantly impact their job performance; orientation, in-house training, seminars, on-the-job training and instructor-led training.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the university libraries in the Federal University Oye Ekiti, Nigeria. The variables used in this study were restricted to training and development of library staff and job performance of librarians in FUOYE, and professional development programmes available for FUOYE librarians.

Practical implications

Other forms of professional development programmes such as Distance Educational Programmes, Conferences/Workshops, Study visits, Formal professional library education and TETFUND Programmes should be made available for university library staff. Universities should always organise staff professional development programmes; since it enhances the job performance of library staff.

Originality/value

This article is original and has not been published elsewhere.

Details

Library Management, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Harun Sesen and Senay Sahil Ertan

This study aims to mediate the impact of workplace stress and job satisfaction on nurses’ perception of training. It sheds light on the links between job satisfaction…

1137

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to mediate the impact of workplace stress and job satisfaction on nurses’ perception of training. It sheds light on the links between job satisfaction, Certified Nursing Assistants’ perception of training and workplace stress in nursing homes.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed in 12 different elderly home care centres in Northern Cyprus during September to October 2017. The sampling frame consists of 317 full-time Certified Nursing Assistants who completed measures of perception of training, job satisfaction and workplace stress. This paper used structural equation modelling to test a theoretical model and hypothesis.

Findings

The findings emphasize that Certified Nursing Assistants’ perception of training has a positive impact on their job satisfaction and negative impact on workplace stress while workplace stress mediates the relationship between their perception of training and job satisfaction. The results indicate that while the motivation for training and support for training have an effect on job satisfaction, access to training and benefits for training do not yield any significant impact on it and workplace stress plays a mediating role.

Originality/value

This study confirms that the CNAs’ perception of training and job stress affect the emergence of job satisfaction, and workplace stress mediated the relation between training and satisfaction posited by social exchange theory.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Edward Ocen, Kasekende Francis and Gladies Angundaru

The purpose of this paper is to establish the role of training in building employee commitment and the task of job satisfaction in the association between training and…

6177

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the role of training in building employee commitment and the task of job satisfaction in the association between training and employee commitment in the banking sector in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used correlation, regression and MedGraph to investigate the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed that there is a positive relationships between training and employee commitment (r = 0.507**, p < 0.01), a positive relationship between training and job satisfaction (r = 0.744**, p < 0.01) and a positive relationship between job satisfaction and employee commitment (r = 0.519**, p < 0.01). The regression model showed that the predictor variables explain at least 29.7 per cent of the variance in employee commitment (adjusted R2 = 0.297). MedGraph results revealed a partial type of mediation because the correlation between training (independent variable) and employee commitment (dependent variable) decreased from 0.507*** to 0.271*** by inclusion of job satisfaction (mediating variable).

Originality/value

This study is one of the pioneers to extend the employee commitment debate to Ugandan banking sector. It provides an explanation with empirical evidence by demonstrating that training extends direct positive effect on employee commitment in the banking sector in Ugandan situation. The study also demonstrates that, in the banking sector in Uganda, job satisfaction helps to partially transmit the effect of training on employee commitment. This study further builds a model that will help researchers and practitioners in investigating and explaining employee commitment in the banking sector in Ugandan situation.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Clifton P. Campbell

Job analysis is the common basis for designing a training course orprogramme, preparing performance tests, writing position (job)descriptions, identifying performance…

2602

Abstract

Job analysis is the common basis for designing a training course or programme, preparing performance tests, writing position (job) descriptions, identifying performance appraisal criteria, and job restructuring. Its other applications in human resource development include career counselling and wage and salary administration. Job analysis answers the questions of what tasks, performed in what manner, make up a job. Outputs of this analytical study include: (a) a list of the job tasks; (b) details of how each task is performed; (c) statements describing the responsibility, job knowledge, mental application, and dexterity, as well as accuracy required; and (d) a list of the equipment, materials, and supplies used to perform the job. Various techniques for conducting a job analysis have been used. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. As a result, different techniques or combinations of techniques are appropriate to different situations. The combined on‐site observation and individual interview techniques are recommended for industrial, trade, craft, clerical, and technical jobs because they generate the most thorough and probably the most valid information. A job analysis schedule is used to report the job information obtained through observations and individual interviews. The schedule provides a framework of 12 items in which to arrange and describe important job analysis information. These 12 items are organised into four sections. Section one consists of items one through four. These items identify the job within the establishment in which it occurs. The second section presents item five, the work performed. It provides a thorough and complete description of the tasks of the job. The Work Performed section describes what the job incumbent does, how it is done, and why it is done. Section three presents items six through nine. These are the requirements placed on the job incumbent for successful performance. It is a detailed interpretation of the basic minimum (a) responsibility, (b) job knowledge, (c) mental application, and (d) dexterity and accuracy required of the job incumbent. The fourth section includes three items which provide background information on the job. These items are: (a) equipment, materials and supplies; (b) definitions of terms; and (c) general comments. Appendix A is a glossary of terms associated with job analysis. It is provided to facilitate more exacting communication. A job analysis schedule for a complex and a relatively simple job are included in Appendices B and C. These examples illustrate how important job analysis information is arranged and described. Appendix D provides a list of action verbs which are helpful when describing the manipulative tasks of a job.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Clair Brown

Analyses the role of training in forming under‐employment, which isa basic characteristic of an institutional labour market. Compares thebasic assumptions of an…

Abstract

Analyses the role of training in forming under‐employment, which is a basic characteristic of an institutional labour market. Compares the basic assumptions of an institutional labour market to those of a neoclassical labour market. Discusses in detail the institutional framework for on‐the‐job training. Finally, considers policy issues relating to job training.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Boreum Ju and Jessica Li

The purpose of this study is to explore how training, job tenure and education-job and skills-job matches impact employees’ turnover intention by using a representative…

3083

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how training, job tenure and education-job and skills-job matches impact employees’ turnover intention by using a representative national sample from the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study in which 1,531 individuals were followed from 2003 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

A hierarchical-regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationships among training, job tenure, education-job match, skills-job match and turnover intention. This analysis focused on 12 year-to-year time points from 2003 to 2014 (one for each year), and the data were measured for each individual.

Findings

The results from the hierarchical-regression analysis supported the hypotheses that on-the-job training, off-the-job training, distance training, job tenure and education-job and skills-job matches are significantly associated with turnover intention.

Originality/value

The findings of this study, based on human capital theory and firm-specific human capital theory, contribute to an understanding of how training and the education-job and skills-job matches may impact turnover intention in a non-Western context. It also provides a longitudinal perspective of the impact of training on employee turnover intention to inform human resource development professionals when planning employee training.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1979

B.O. Pettman, B. Showler and M. Maguire

This monograph presents the results of a two‐year study (1975–77) of the impact of British Government vocational training (GVT) measures in the North Humberside local…

Abstract

This monograph presents the results of a two‐year study (1975–77) of the impact of British Government vocational training (GVT) measures in the North Humberside local labour market. This section briefly outlines the general training policy background within which the local provision has operated and outlines the structure of this monograph.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1973

JOHN WELLENS

So far, in this Vulcan series, I have described how the analytical movement brought about a clearer appreciation of the nature of physical skills. There are several…

Abstract

So far, in this Vulcan series, I have described how the analytical movement brought about a clearer appreciation of the nature of physical skills. There are several distinct concepts. First comes the separation of job knowledge from the skills. Job knowledge consists mainly of comprehension — an understanding of certain basic principles, theories, properties of the materials being processed, knowledge of how to calculate cutting speeds and rates of feed and so on. Skill is the mastery of the performance which operates on the actual workpiece or process. Job knowledge, being a form of comprehension, implies that the mental activity is conscious. Skill, while at the early developmental stage consciously‐controlled, is not truly a skill until most of the activity is adapted to take place within the subconscious level. The early stages of skill training communicate performance consciously but the function of repetitive exercises is to turn this conscious activity into a subconscious activity. The second principle is that skill performance is a sensori‐motor activity: that the performer is processing sensory information coming in from the task and that he uses the sensory input to control the motor or doing activity in continuous feed‐back. The contribution of the skills analyst has been to explore more fully the nature of the sensory feed‐back and to place this new knowledge at the disposal of the trainer, who previously had tended to concentrate almost exclusively on the actual doing part of performance. The third principle has to do with that sixth sense known as the kinaesthetic sense or the feel of the job when it is being properly performed. A fourth principle concerns the over‐riding importance of job analysis: the concept that training cannot be correctly designed without the task itself being analysed first. A fundamental point of job analysis is that it can be carried out at different levels of penetration and that one skill the trainer himself has to acquire is the ability to make the correct choice of that form of analysis which will optimise his results but minimise his use of effort and other resources.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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