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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Lartyg Wilkinson and Nigel van Zwanenberg

Even for a personnel specialist, the production of a personspecification for a specific managerial job is a difficult task. Theknowledge requirements for this task are not…

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6432

Abstract

Even for a personnel specialist, the production of a person specification for a specific managerial job is a difficult task. The knowledge requirements for this task are not well structured, nor are the procedures to be followed well defined. Yet such tasks are increasingly being delegated to line managers. Describes an attempt to structure the knowledge in this non‐formal domain and then the development of a computerized knowledge‐ based system to support the non‐expert in this task.

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Personnel Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Robert W. Hetherington

This study examines the impact of bureaucratic structure on morale among hospital staff. Hypotheses are drawn from Hage's axiomatic theory of organizations, including the…

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484

Abstract

This study examines the impact of bureaucratic structure on morale among hospital staff. Hypotheses are drawn from Hage's axiomatic theory of organizations, including the predicted negative impact on morale of formalization, centralization and stratification, and the positive impact on morale of task complexity. Contingency hypotheses involving structure and task complexity are also examined. Results indicate morale is either positively affected or unaffected by structure, and negatively affected by process. Some evidence of contingent effects are found. The findings are discussed within the broader context of Weber's theory of bureaucracy. This paper addresses the relationship between several structural features of bureaucracy and workers' morale in a hospital setting. It examines these relationships from broadly defined theoretical perspectives. In this connection, Weber's theory of bureaucracy is treated, as was the case in his original, as part of his general theory of rationalization in modern western society. The study considers the relationship between: 1) Formalization and morale, 2) Centralization and morale, 3) Stratification and morale, 4) Complexity and morale. These structural features of bureaucracy—formalization, centralization, stratification and complexity‐are treated as the means at the command of management for attaining organizational objectives. Worker morale is often referred to as the “level of feeling” about themselves among workers or about the work they perform (Revans, 1964; Veninga, 1982; Simendinger and Moore, 1985; Zucker, 1988). In effect, the term is used in stating that morale is high or low to suggest that something is right or wrong about the organization. Surprisingly, many of these studies do not explain why they are suggesting a particular state of morale, but only that the state of morale is crucial to the performance of the organization. In essence, morale is the level of confidence of the employees. It can vary from one department to the other due to specific or overall structural conditions of the organizations; without giving it routine consideration, performance will degenerate (Nelson, 1989).

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Richard Proctor

I approach this work in the knowledge that the recruitment and selection of staff is one of the most neglected areas of library management. I have been unable to trace any…

Abstract

I approach this work in the knowledge that the recruitment and selection of staff is one of the most neglected areas of library management. I have been unable to trace any monograph devoted to the subject published during the past 10 years and few general books on library management spare more than a cursory glance in its direction.

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Library Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1957

THE study of fatigue from a physiological aspect is a field which motion study technicians have made little or no attempt to explore. Shame on their heads. The…

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Abstract

THE study of fatigue from a physiological aspect is a field which motion study technicians have made little or no attempt to explore. Shame on their heads. The physiological simplification of motions aimed at reducing fatigue could have completely offset the notion that motion study is aimed at converting the operator into an automaton. It may well be that an elaborate motion pattern set‐up designed to simplify the work merely succeeds in setting up stresses in the worker. The superimposing of a time‐studied standard for the job may not have taken into account the adaptation of the speed of motions to the physiological limitations of the operator working at a high level performance. Very few practitioners have attempted to study motions in the factory with a view to reducing fatigue and stress as a prerequisite to studying the set‐up for increased production. Still fewer have attempted to evaluate these factors. It is about time they did.

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Work Study, vol. 6 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Amna Abdallah and Salam Abdallah

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors that influence the improvement of productive work behaviour (PWB) in the dynamic, ergonomic nature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors that influence the improvement of productive work behaviour (PWB) in the dynamic, ergonomic nature.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used, in experiment 1, to select and prioritise the most relevant criteria for improvement of PWB. A multi-criteria method is used to analyse and compare the importance of four main criteria and 16 sub-criteria identified from previous studies. The structural equation modelling (SEM) is also used to validate the findings of experiment 1.

Findings

This study revealed that not all criteria are considered important for improving PWB. Flexibility and job specifications were the top-scored criteria. These criteria collectively accounted for more than 65% of the four studied criteria. The SEM emphasised the significance of flexibility and job description of the changing dynamics of organisational regulation during the contemporary economic and managerial turmoil.

Research limitations/implications

This study explored the criteria required to improve PWB. The findings recommend that future studies should be designed to identify new elements and add new criteria and test the newly introduced variables at a physical workplace after the outbreak ends.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the differential impacts of the criteria on the performance of PWB govern decision-makers in private and governmental organisation, especially at such times of economic turmoil and need for innovative strategies.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored workplace behaviour and the environment in the government sector. Therefore, the focus of this study is the comprehensive coverage of workplace behaviour and the criteria influencing its productivity before and during the coronavirus outbreak.

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Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Alison Jago

Emphasizes that the success of the library/information service is largely dependent on the ability of the manager to select the right people to make up the team. Stresses…

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Abstract

Emphasizes that the success of the library/information service is largely dependent on the ability of the manager to select the right people to make up the team. Stresses that recruitment and selection of staff is a professional skill, essential to the portfolio of management skills required by the library/information specialist at senior level. Recommends practical training in interviewing and selection. Suggests that when a vacancy occurs allow time to think before taking action and consider all the options available. A job description is essential and forms the basis of the recruitment process. The person specification is based on the job description and outlines the qualifications, professional expertise, and other attributes required by the person to do the job. Concludes with a summary of key points.

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Librarian Career Development, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

Jane Wainwright

Explaining that there is a similarity in the early stages of tendering irrespective of the size of the potential expenditure, the stages are outlined under 7 headings. The…

Abstract

Explaining that there is a similarity in the early stages of tendering irrespective of the size of the potential expenditure, the stages are outlined under 7 headings. The paper concentrates on large systems while pointing out the parallels for small jobs. It is emphasised that drawing up specifications is inevitably a lengthy procedure. Certain problems have to be faced early as to the amount of money to be spent, the computer to be used and the person to draw up the specification. With these problems resolved, the next step is the feasibility study based on analysis of the existing system. Various solutions will emerge, but other systems with similar requirements should be investigated for comparison. The paper lists what the study should include and indicates its role. Once approved, then the specification for tender is drawn up and should include the topics listed. Some guidance on presentation is given.

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Program, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Sha’ri M. Yusof

Quality has been proven to be an important strategic weapon inorder to survive in today’s highly competitive business environment. Tobuild quality in products and services…

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418

Abstract

Quality has been proven to be an important strategic weapon in order to survive in today’s highly competitive business environment. To build quality in products and services requires organizations to implement a quality management system which is accepted internationally. BS 5750 which is similar to ISO 9000 helps achieve this objective. Service industries are also striving towards excellence in service and therefore require a quality system. Shows the result of an initial study conducted on an electrical contracting company. Assessments on existing management systems were conducted and recommendations provided for the next course of action to ensure successful implementation of BS 5750 in this company. BS 5750 provides a foundation in the quest towards total quality management.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1984

Kathleen Wray

A micro level study was undertaken in a local labour market (LLM) comprising one small town and two industrial villages, each within commuting distance of the town. The…

Abstract

A micro level study was undertaken in a local labour market (LLM) comprising one small town and two industrial villages, each within commuting distance of the town. The boundary of the LLM was clearly defined in that it was surrounded by open countryside free of industry. Analysis of collected data shows that commuting to any other neighbouring industrial settlement was rare, and that the LLM was characterised by relatively high female participation. The aim of the research was to identify the relationships of demand for female in‐factory manual workers and to compare these with those of twilight workers and homeworkers who performed identical work for the same employers. The major industry, that of hosiery and knitwear manufacture, was surveyed to provide a large body of information, but this article extracts only those data relevant to recruitment practices. A pre‐pilot study of a hosiery and knitwear manufacturing company in a different LLM, and a pilot study of footwear manufacturing establishments in the same LLM, revealed that the industry was likely to generate sexually segregated labour forces. Consequently, it was necessary to collect some data for men in order to put into perspective the demands for women.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

IN every sector of endeavour, the professions not excluded, progress has been accompanied by fear that it would be followed by unemployment. To some extent it is true and…

Abstract

IN every sector of endeavour, the professions not excluded, progress has been accompanied by fear that it would be followed by unemployment. To some extent it is true and inevitable, of course. The invention of printing made the work of monks and scribes unnecessary. Then that was followed by metal type, that put the carvers of wood type out of work, followed in turn by Linotype machines making much arduous hand setting and subsequent distributing the separate letters back into their cases less in demand. Copying machines meant a virtual end to the need for tracers. Computers cut the requirements of many offices and robots are taking over in factories the more arduous, heavy or unpleasant tasks hitherto done, however reluctantly, by men.

Details

Work Study, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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