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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Bernard J. Jansen, Karen J. Jansen and Amanda Spink

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The web is now a significant component of the recruitment and job search process. However, very little is known about how companies and job seekers use the web, and the ultimate effectiveness of this process. The specific research questions guiding this study are: how do people search for job‐related information on the web? How effective are these searches? And how likely are job seekers to find an appropriate job posting or application?

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to examine these questions come from job seekers submitting job‐related queries to a major web search engine at three points in time over a five‐year period.

Findings

Results indicate that individuals seeking job information generally submit only one query with several terms and over 45 percent of job‐seeking queries contain a specific location reference. Of the documents retrieved, findings suggest that only 52 percent are relevant and only 40 percent of job‐specific searches retrieve job postings.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an important contribution to web research and online recruiting literature. The data come from actual web searches, providing a realistic glimpse into how job seekers are actually using the web.

Practical implications

The results of this research can assist organizations in seeking to use the web as part of their recruiting efforts, in designing corporate recruiting web sites, and in developing web systems to support job seeking and recruiting.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate job searching on the web using longitudinal real world data.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Monika Hjeds Löfmark

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of job search and human capital of the unemployed in the Russian Federation for obtaining a job the following year.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of job search and human capital of the unemployed in the Russian Federation for obtaining a job the following year.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data on human capital and jobsearch strategies from different years of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey are used in different probit specifications to present and analyse empirical results.

Findings

Searching through friends and directly are the most common search methods, implying a large trust in networks. Moreover, people tend to do the right thing when trusting their networks; in 1994, searching via friends and directly were the only methods with a positive impact. People used fewer methods in 1994 and the impact of job searching is also higher in the latter two samples. This indicates a society gradually adapting to unemployment. As regards human capital, it is worth noticing that the results in 2004 are in accordance with several predictions of human capital theory, whereas the impact of medium education and work experience in the samples based on earlier years is weaker. This suggests that more people have had time to upgrade their skills, to obtain relevant work experience and/or to obtain a post transition secondary education in 2003.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the importance of both different jobsearch strategies and human capital when searching for a job in the Russian Federation. The result presented may be of interest to both policy‐makers and scientists.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Adam Kanar

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of self-regulation during job search by integrating goal-orientation theory with a resource allocation framework.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of self-regulation during job search by integrating goal-orientation theory with a resource allocation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The author surveyed job searching new labor market entrants at two time points and hypothesized that the effects of job seekers’ state goal orientations on indicators of self-regulation during the job search process (procrastination, anxiety, and guidance-seeking behaviors) depended on levels of employment goal commitment (EGC).

Findings

Results indicate that for job seekers with higher levels of EGC, a state learning-approach goal orientation (LGO) was beneficial for the job search process and a state performance-approach goal orientation (PGO) was detrimental. For job seekers with lower levels of EGC, a state LGO was detrimental to the search process, while a state PGO was beneficial.

Research limitations/implications

This research extends the understanding of state goal orientation in the context of job search. Future research may replicate these findings with different samples of employed and unemployed job seekers and extend this research with additional conceptualizations of resource limitations.

Practical implications

The present research suggests that the effectiveness of learning-approach goal-orientation training methods in the context of job search must be considered in light of individual differences in resource availability. In particular, individuals with lower resources available for job searching may benefit from interventions focusing on increasing state PGO.

Originality/value

The present results suggest that EGC is an important moderator of the impact of job search goal orientation on indicators of self-regulation during job search, and therefore present important boundary conditions regarding the role of state goal orientation in the job search process.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Abstract

Details

Structural Models of Wage and Employment Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44452-089-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Adam Kanar and Dave Bouckenooghe

The present study aimed to understand how participation in university extracurricular activities has a beneficial or detrimental impact on students’ employment…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aimed to understand how participation in university extracurricular activities has a beneficial or detrimental impact on students’ employment self-efficacy through the intervening mechanism of information search strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from active job-searching university students across two time-points and hypothesized that the breadth of extracurricular activity participation would positively impact employment self-efficacy perceptions and information search strategies (focused, exploratory and haphazard) would mediate this relationship.

Findings

Results indicate that the breadth of students' participation in extracurricular activities was positively associated with employment self-efficacy perceptions, and this relationship was mediated by focused and exploratory information-search strategies. Extracurricular activities exhibited a negative relationship with a haphazard search strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This research extends the understanding of the role of participation in extracurricular activities for influencing a job search. Future research may replicate these findings with different samples of job seekers.

Practical implications

Extracurricular activities are typically offered at universities as a way for students to develop skills and to improve employers' perceptions of students. The present results suggest that participating in extracurricular activities may also help university students to effectively conduct a self-directed job search.

Originality/value

We examined the role of extracurricular activities from the applicant's perspective, extending prior research examining extracurricular activities from the employer's perspective. The present results suggest that extracurricular activities play an important role in shaping the job search process of university students by influencing students' confidence for finding employment. Information search strategies mediated the effects of extracurricular activities on employment self-efficacy perceptions, suggesting that participating in extracurricular activities changed the way that applicants searched for jobs.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Brent J. Lyons, Jennifer L. Wessel, Yi Chiew Tai and Ann Marie Ryan

Given the increasing diversity in the age of job seekers worldwide and evidence of perceptions of discrimination and stereotypes of job seekers at both ends of the age…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increasing diversity in the age of job seekers worldwide and evidence of perceptions of discrimination and stereotypes of job seekers at both ends of the age continuum, the purpose of this paper is to identify how perceptions of age-related bias are connected to age-related identity management strategies of unemployed job seekers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 129 unemployed job-seeking adults who were participants in a career placement service. Participants completed paper-and-pencil surveys about their experiences of age-related bias and engagement in age-related identity management strategies during their job searches.

Findings

Older job seekers reported greater perceptions of age-related bias in employment settings, and perceptions of bias related to engaging in attempts to counteract stereotypes, mislead or miscue about one's age, and avoid age-related discussions in job searching. Individuals who were less anxious about their job search were less likely to mislead about age or avoid the topic of age, whereas individuals with higher job-search self-efficacy were more likely to acknowledge their age during their job search. Older job seekers higher in emotion control were more likely to acknowledge their age.

Originality/value

Little is known about how job seekers attempt to compensate for or avoid age-related bias. The study provides evidence that younger and older job seekers engage in age-related identity management and that job search competencies relate to engagement in particular strategies.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Yu-Lun Liu, Kathleen A. Keeling and K. Nadia Papamichail

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of jobseeker decision-making style on information search behaviour, information evaluation and perceptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of jobseeker decision-making style on information search behaviour, information evaluation and perceptions of organisational attractiveness (OA). In this study, the authors assess whether, when presented with a realistic job information searching scenario of receiving basic job information from a typical formal short job advertisement, maximisers and satisficers differ on need for further information and evaluation of further information from informal information sources in relation to valence and tie strength.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based experiment was conducted on 280 participants from the USA, with work experience in retail, using Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Findings

The results show that, compared to satisficers, significantly more maximisers chose to search for further information about the company/vacancy after receiving a typical short advertisement message. Furthermore, the results highlight the moderating effects of decision-making style (maximiser vs satisficer), tie strength (strong-tie vs weak-tie provider) and message valence (positive vs negative) on jobseekers’ perceived OA.

Practical implications

Companies seeking to increase their candidate pool should consider accommodating the different decision-making styles of jobseekers by carefully designing the content of recruitment information and utilising recruitment information sources. Although conducted in just one sector, the ubiquity of the maximiser/satisficer decision-making style implies further research to assess the implications for other sectors.

Originality/value

Research on decision-making style in recruitment is relatively limited. This study demonstrates the differences between maximisers and satisficers in terms of job-related information needs, and the evaluation of the source/content, when searching for a retail trade job.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2013

Laxmikant Manroop and Julia Richardson

This study aims to investigate the extent to which Generation Y job seekers use social media to enhance their job search experience.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the extent to which Generation Y job seekers use social media to enhance their job search experience.

Design/Methodology/Approach

The chapter draws on an in-depth analysis of qualitative data gathered from 29 interviews with recent university graduates in Human Resource Management (HRM).

Findings

The findings of this study challenge popular stereotypes and anecdotes which seem to suggest that the power of technology come naturally and easily to Generation Y users (The Economist, 2010). It also suggests that young people, particularly graduates are unprepared for the job market. Many of them are stuck in the traditional ways of looking for a job despite the information that is available for them to exploit modern technologies to enhance their job search experience.

Implications

Colleges and universities should include modern job search techniques such as social media into their curricula. In addition, career centers and employers need to play their part in disseminating information about how social media can be used by graduates to search for jobs.

Originality/Value

The study emphasizes the need for individual users to exploit technology such as social media to enhance their professional and career success.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Serge P. da Motta Veiga, Daniel B. Turban, Allison S. Gabriel and Nitya Chawla

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search

Abstract

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search research has grown tremendously over the last two decades. In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of prior research, discuss important trends in current research, and suggest areas for future research. The authors conceptualize the job search as an unfolding process (i.e., a process through which job seekers navigate through stages to achieve their goal of finding and accepting a job) in which job seekers engage in self-regulation behaviors. The authors contrast research that has taken a between-person, static approach with research that has taken a within-person, dynamic approach and highlight the importance of combining between- and within-person designs in order to have a more holistic understanding of the job search process. Finally, authors provide some recommendations for future research. Much remains to be learned about what influences job search self-regulation, and how job self-regulation influences job search and employment outcomes depending on individual, contextual, and environmental factors.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Yu-Lun Liu, Kathleen A. Keeling and K. Nadia Papamichail

The purpose of this paper is to investigate differences in characteristics, job outcome experiences and attitudes of maximiser and satisficer decision-making style groups…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate differences in characteristics, job outcome experiences and attitudes of maximiser and satisficer decision-making style groups working in the retail trade.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 140 participants who have accepted a job offer in the retail trade in the past six months in the USA was conducted on Amazon Mechanical Turk. The survey examined participants’ opinions and attitudes towards their present job and established which job information source(s) they had used to search for retail trade job-related information.

Findings

The results show that compared to satisficers, maximisers exert more effort when searching job information, have higher uncertainty avoidance and need for cognition, and experience more post-decisional regret. In this sample, any significant differences between maximisers and satisficers in relation to job satisfaction, company commitment, and intention to quit their present job are restricted to certain groups. For recruitment information sources, while satisficers rely on their families and friends for information, maximisers are more likely to obtain job-related information from other sources such as online discussion forums.

Practical implications

Even though some studies suggest that maximisers are unhappy with their choices, this research recommends that retail trade companies should not exclude maximisers from their recruitment pools. Retailers should enhance their candidate pools with both maximisers and satisficers by managing different recruitment information sources.

Originality/value

Research of decision-making style in recruitment is relatively limited. This research illustrates the differences of attitudes between maximisers and satisficers towards their present retail job, and also demonstrates the preferences of maximisers and satisficers in recruitment information sources.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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