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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Rabia Mushtaq, Usman Raja and Mohammad Bashir Khan

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the relationship between job scope and in-role performance is contingent upon the level of social support (i.e. supervisor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the relationship between job scope and in-role performance is contingent upon the level of social support (i.e. supervisor support) received in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 640 questionnaires were distributed to employees of Pakistani companies, yielding 328 useable responses for analysis. Regression analysis was used to test for both hypotheses.

Findings

The results support the role of supervisor support as a moderator in the relationship between in-role performance, a dimension of job performance and job scope. The findings show that a higher job scope would facilitate higher job performance from employees who receive high levels of supervisor support.

Practical implications

The results provide useful insights for managers and consultants, especially HR professionals involved in job design and redesign. Organizations that encourage high levels of social support can help employees improve their job performance as they foster an environment where employees can get direct assistance and advice from their supervisors.

Originality/value

This paper makes three key contributions to the literature on job design. First, this inquiry shows that a strong link does exist between job scope and job performance; previous studies have failed to find a strong relationship. Second, it highlights how social context, especially in highly challenging work settings, can shape employees’ proficiencies and behaviors. Third, this paper offers a novel perspective in job design research by incorporating a contextual moderator (i.e. supervisor support).

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1985

A. Keith Redway

In order that a manager ensures the smooth running of all project activities through to a successful conclusion he must use the manpower at his disposal to best effect…

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1738

Abstract

In order that a manager ensures the smooth running of all project activities through to a successful conclusion he must use the manpower at his disposal to best effect, commit the financial resources available economically, and meet the necessary time deadlines. This requires a significant effort in planning, the typical plan elements comprising project purpose (objectives); job scope; basis of feasibility; division of responsibilities; responsible personnel; organisation chart; financing arrangements; agreements (contracts); schedule (programme); administrative plans; cost/progress reports/controls; legal, planning and insurance; and implementation of construction.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 85 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

José R. Goris

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of communication satisfaction on the association between individual‐job congruence and both job

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13644

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of communication satisfaction on the association between individual‐job congruence and both job performance and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Moderated regression analysis was used to assess data collected from 302 employees addressing the research variables of job scope, growth need strength, satisfaction with communication, job performance, and job satisfaction.

Findings

Satisfaction with communication received weak support as a moderator of the individual‐job congruence model; nevertheless, it received strong support as a main predictor of both performance and satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Low statistical power frequently reflected by moderated regression analysis may explain the weak support communication satisfaction received as a moderator. Different approaches for solving the presence of low power are discussed. On the other hand, the elusive venture of promoting and experiencing satisfaction with communication has been detected and the need for exploring the possible curvilinear effects of specific communication dimensions and organizational constructs on communication satisfaction is introduced.

Practical implications

Variables associated with human interaction may be dysfunctional at both extremes. For example, upward communication might have favorable and unfavorable consequences on satisfaction with communication. Thus, dealing with communication satisfaction may necessitate the adoption of a contingency approach.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this research lies in its effort of exploring the moderating impact of communication satisfaction on the job characteristics model. The results encourage future research endeavors and particular management practices.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Meghan Moriarty Gerrard

Organizations put significant resources toward the management of global assignments; however, few realize the full benefits that these experiences provide in terms of the…

Abstract

Organizations put significant resources toward the management of global assignments; however, few realize the full benefits that these experiences provide in terms of the development of future leaders. This chapter presents three principles for directing global assignment strategies to maximize effectiveness and supports those principles with research among a sample of leaders at a global organization. First, effective global assignments are powerful sources of leader development and can be implemented to maximize this outcome. Second, assignments differ in their developmental value with some assignments providing significantly more value than others. Third, individuals differ in their ability to perform on assignment. Finally, implications of the research findings and principles for global talent management strategy are discussed.

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-468-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Phil Picheng Lee and Gary Kleinman

The public accounting sector of the accounting profession has long been very concerned with the problem of employee recruitment and retention. As early as the 1970s, the…

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1848

Abstract

The public accounting sector of the accounting profession has long been very concerned with the problem of employee recruitment and retention. As early as the 1970s, the then Big 8 firms funded extensive studies of the determinants of employee turnover. The problem is no less real today. Indeed, much has been written about the problem of the vanishing accounting student. If reducing employee turnover and dissatisfaction becomes important in order for the public accounting firms to fulfill their mission of helping to assure the quality of information that investors receive, then having tools that foster an understanding of the determinants of employee dissatisfaction, stress, and turnover is vital. Sheds light on these issues by demonstrating how sophisticated statistical techniques can illuminate the underlying determinants of employee turnover and other important job attitudes. Applies structural equation modeling to Collins and Killough's dataset in order to demonstrate how it can provide important additional substantive insights about relationships between the stressors and job outcomes in public accounting. This important interpretive information is not available, or is available in only limited fashion, in the comparison method of canonical correlation analysis.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Linda Lee Larson

This study used the Ivancevich and Matteson Stress Diagnostic Survey to gather data concerning job stress for a large national sample of internal auditors in the USA…

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11255

Abstract

This study used the Ivancevich and Matteson Stress Diagnostic Survey to gather data concerning job stress for a large national sample of internal auditors in the USA. Survey respondents indicated that the organizational job stressors in their work environment were more a source of stress than the so‐called individual job factors. Specifically, respondents would like to be paid more and participate more in the decision‐making processes relating to their jobs. Company politics and lack of training and development opportunities were other major sources of stress. Implications for the profession are clear. Internal audit managers should be aware of the job stress inherent in the nature of the work of an internal auditor and take appropriate steps to reduce organizational job stressors rather than face the risk of increased staff job turnover.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Dag Ingvar Jacobsen

Puts the focus on the possible relations between part‐time work and organisational commitment. An empirical study, using data from ten Norwegian institutions caring for…

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2899

Abstract

Puts the focus on the possible relations between part‐time work and organisational commitment. An empirical study, using data from ten Norwegian institutions caring for the elderly, concludes that part‐time work has both direct and indirect effects on different types of commitment. First, and contrary to what was expected, it seems as though affective commitment decreases as the hours worked approach that of a full‐time job. Second, part‐time arrangements have an indirect effect on several types of commitment through the degree of participation in the organisation’s decision processes. Part‐time workers participate less, and seem to exhibit less affective, and higher continuance commitment. Effects of these findings on outcomes, such as plans to leave the organisation, the voicing of criticism, loyalty to the organisation, and withdrawal and apathy among workers, are discussed. Implications for human resource management are also discussed.

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Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Cecil A.L. Pearson and Samir R. Chatterjee

Explores relationships between relevant work setting variables in a Hong Kong organization. The study examined a set of Western assumptions in terms of structural…

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1073

Abstract

Explores relationships between relevant work setting variables in a Hong Kong organization. The study examined a set of Western assumptions in terms of structural properties of centralization and formalization and the view that they will be negatively associated with workplace responses of motivation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment, while an enriched job content will be positively related to employee responses. There was empirical support for most of the connections of this framework, but formalization was observed to have positive relationships with employee perceptions and affections. In addition, there was evidence that the responses of the incumbents were influenced by the assessed demographic characteristics. These results provide further evidence that organizational members pay moderate attention to demographic attributes, yet this factor has not been a prominent component of contemporary job design research. The findings are reported in terms of the need to consider both demographic and sociocultural effects when explaining responses of individual employees.

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Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Darren Lee‐Ross

This paper assesses the reliability and rationale of Hackman and Oldham’s job characteristics model among public and private sector hospital chefs in Australia. It…

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3903

Abstract

This paper assesses the reliability and rationale of Hackman and Oldham’s job characteristics model among public and private sector hospital chefs in Australia. It continues by focusing on critical job elements of chefs and their motivational outcomes. The job of chef in private sector hospitals was found to be more challenging with greater motivating potential than that in the public sector. Reliance of hospitality services managers upon technology appears to have resulted in a deskilled production process and, consequently, a demotivated workforce.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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