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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

I.J. Hetty van Emmerik, Bert Schreurs, Nele de Cuyper, I.M. Jawahar and Maria C.W. Peeters

Drawing from the job characteristics model and the job demands‐resources model, this study aims to examine the associations of resources (i.e. feedback, autonomy, and…

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4793

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the job characteristics model and the job demands‐resources model, this study aims to examine the associations of resources (i.e. feedback, autonomy, and variety) with intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and employability.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling on data from 611 employees of a Dutch municipality.

Findings

Consistent with the hypotheses, the authors' results indicated that resources are related to both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and that the association between resources and employability was mediated by extrinsic motivation but not by intrinsic motivation.

Research limitations/implications

The authors use a one‐dimensional measure of perceived employability and do not make a distinction between internal and external employability and other dimensions of employability. The authors feel that distinguishing between internal employability and external employability will contribute to understanding if internal and external opportunities relate differently to perceptions of employability with the same organization and with a different organization.

Originality/value

Job resources are important for improvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, but the route from job resources to employability is via extrinsic job opportunities and not via intrinsic job opportunities. That is, the perception of performance outcome goals by employees is important for the association between job resources and employability. The paper shows that, without denying the value of intrinsic motivation, it is important for management to emphasize the instrumental value of resources embedded in the job itself that have implications for employability and career advancement.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Alan Kirschenbaum and Rita Mano‐Negrin

This paper explores the combined impact of past job histories and present job opportunities on turnover decisions. We predict turnover decisions on the basis of the…

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2078

Abstract

This paper explores the combined impact of past job histories and present job opportunities on turnover decisions. We predict turnover decisions on the basis of the structural approach, emphasizing previous work experiences (time spent in past job positions) and the organizational approach (focusing on objective and perceived internal and external employment positions opportunities). A cross‐sectional analysis of employees from four occupational groups in eight medical institutions and a follow‐up sample of 81 “quitters” formed the database for the study. The results suggest that past work history and present employment opportunities produce occupation‐dependent differences in turnover behavior. It is shown that differences in employees’ perception of opportunities, modified by the occupation’s “market viability”, influence turnover. These results demonstrate that integrating the structural and organizational approach, involving both past job histories and present opportunities, improve the prediction of turnover decisions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Rita Mano‐Negrin and Shay S. Tzafrir

The pursuit and attainment of alternative job opportunities within labor markets can have a significant impact on work relations in organizations. This search and turnover…

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5898

Abstract

The pursuit and attainment of alternative job opportunities within labor markets can have a significant impact on work relations in organizations. This search and turnover syndrome is explored here by reexamining the impact that internal and external labor market opportunities have on this process. The individual, organizational and market characteristics of a sample of over 700 employees from medical centers in Israel were used to show that job search modes have no direct effect on turnover behavior. The type and intensity of a job search did, however, depend on employees' perception of various labor market opportunities. Search modes themselves are affected by individual and organizational level characteristics and the employees' intention to leave. This suggests that while negative perceptions of opportunities in the internal labor market matched by positive perceptions of external market opportunities directly affect the turnover decision‐making process, job search behaviors do not necessarily affect the turnover decision.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Eileen Drew

The subject of part‐time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of…

Abstract

The subject of part‐time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total employment. It is estimated that in 1970, average annual hours worked per employee amounted to only 60% of those for 1870. Two major factors are attributed to explaining the underlying trend towards a reduction in working time: (a) the increase in the number of voluntary part‐time employees and (b) the decrease in average annual number of days worked per employee (Kok and de Neubourg, 1986). The authors noted that the growth rate of part‐time employment in many countries was greater than the corresponding rate of growth in full‐time employment.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 9 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Su-Fen Chiu, Shih-Tse Lin and Tzu-Shian Han

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of employment status on service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) of customer contact employees. The…

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1557

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of employment status on service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) of customer contact employees. The authors also investigate the mediating roles of internal mobility opportunity and job insecurity in the relationship between employment status and service-oriented OCB.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology was used and data were collected from a dyad-sample of 270 employees and their supervisors of one retail and one banking companies in Taiwan. Product-of-coefficients approach and bootstrapping were used to test the multiple mediating model.

Findings

The results demonstrate that temporary employment related negatively to service-oriented OCB. Moreover, both internal mobility opportunity and job insecurity mediated the employment status – service-oriented OCB linkage.

Research limitations/implications

This study has three limitations. First, this study examined only fixed-term direct-hire temporary employees. Future research should explore voluntary job behaviors of different categories of temporary employment to confirm the results of the present study. Second, this study examined internal mobility opportunity and job insecurity as two mediators. Other alternative avenues may exist by which employment status may lead to service-oriented OCB. Future research may explore additional possible mediators. Finally, the participants of this study were selected by the human resource departments of the participating companies. This option could have introduced selection bias in this study.

Practical implications

This study suggests that management should be aware of why temporary customer contact employees have lower levels of service-oriented OCB. As service-oriented OCB may be vital for organizational success in the service context, management must consider the benefits and costs when hiring temporary employees. Moreover, management can motivate temporary employees to display higher service-oriented OCB by shaping their expectations of internal mobility possibilities, or reducing temporary employees’ perception of job insecurity to enhance their service-oriented OCB.

Originality/value

This study makes two contributions. First, this study extends the effect of employment status in the OCB literature by investigating the relationship between employment status and service-oriented OCB for customer contact employees. The results of the present study lend support for the partial exclusion theory to predict that socially excluded group (i.e. temporary employees) tends to be less engaged in service-oriented OCB. Second, this study contributes to the literature by investigating two important links (i.e. internal mobility opportunity and job insecurity) to explain why temporary employment may lead to lower service-oriented OCB.

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Bin Hu, Aaron McCune Stein and Yanhua Mao

Based on the socioemotional selectivity theory, this study aims to explore the differential influences of control and commitment human resource (HR) practices on employee…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the socioemotional selectivity theory, this study aims to explore the differential influences of control and commitment human resource (HR) practices on employee job crafting as well as the mediating role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP).

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a two-wave design to survey 53 HR managers and 339 employees of 53 Chinese firms. The hypotheses were tested by conducting multilevel structural equation modeling in Mplus 7.4.

Findings

The results show that control HR practices are negatively related to job crafting, while commitment HR practices are positively related to job crafting. Further, control HR practices are negatively associated with the remaining opportunities dimension of OFTP, whereas commitment HR practices are positively associated with remaining opportunities. However, both types of HR practices have no significant relationship with the remaining time dimension of OFTP. Finally, remaining opportunities mediate the relationships between both types of HR practices and job crafting.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware of how to promote or inhibit employee job crafting by implementing different HR practices.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the job crafting research by demonstrating that the relationship between HR practices and job crafting depends on the type of HR practices in use, as well as contributing to OFTP research by showing that different types of HR practices have differential relationships with the remaining opportunities dimension of OFTP.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Maral Darouei and Helen Pluut

Recent evidence from glass cliff research suggests that women are more willing than men to accept risky leadership positions. The purpose of this paper (based on three…

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2947

Abstract

Purpose

Recent evidence from glass cliff research suggests that women are more willing than men to accept risky leadership positions. The purpose of this paper (based on three studies) is to reveal and resolve the apparent paradox that women are more risk averse than men yet end up in risky leadership positions.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study I, risk attitudes of 125 participants were surveyed to understand gender differences in risk taking. In two experimental vignette studies, 119 university students (Study II) and 109 working adults (Study III) were offered a leadership position in either a risky or successful company and asked to rate their willingness to accept the job.

Findings

Together, the results showed that although women are generally more risk averse than men, women who scored low on career self-efficacy were more likely to perceive a risky job as a promotional opportunity and were therefore more willing to accept such a job. These findings shed light on the role of women’s career decision making in the glass cliff phenomenon.

Originality/value

Glass cliff research has focused almost exclusively on organizational decision makers. The authors aim to better understand the glass cliff phenomenon by incorporating the perspective of job seekers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Cristina M. Giannantonio, Amy E. Hurley-Hanson, Sharon L. Segrest, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the…

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1256

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the recruitment process.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 498 participants watched a videoed simulation of a recruitment interview and completed a questionnaire. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the interaction and main effect hypotheses.

Findings

Applicant reactions were more favorable with a friendly recruiter. The more favorable the verifiable job attribute information (JAI), the more favorable the applicant reactions were to the employment opportunity. Compared to applicants who received negative or no non-verifiable JAI, applicants who received positive or mixed non-verifiable JAI were more attracted to the recruiter, perceived the employment opportunity as more desirable, and were more willing to pursue the employment opportunity. Reactions were most favorable in the positive non-verifiable JAI condition, less favorable in the mixed condition, and least favorable in the negative condition. Surprisingly, the “no information” mean was above the negative information condition.

Originality/value

This fully crossed 2 × 3 × 4 experiment simultaneously examined 2 levels of recruiter friendliness, 3 levels of verifiable job attributes and 4 levels of non-verifiable job attributes. The five dependent variables were attraction to the recruiter, attraction to the employment opportunity, willingness to pursue the employment opportunity, the perceived probability of receiving a job offer and the number of positive inferences made about unknown organizational characteristics. Previous research examining the effects of employment inducements and job attributes were conducted in field settings where it is difficult to control the amount and favorability of JAI applicants receive.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Margery Povall

Composed earlier this century, the distributionof men′s and women′s jobs in the 1980sdemonstrates a concentration of women inlow‐paid, low‐opportunity jobs despite…

Abstract

Composed earlier this century, the distribution of men′s and women′s jobs in the 1980s demonstrates a concentration of women in low‐paid, low‐opportunity jobs despite women having longer working lives and being better educated. Barriers to women′s progress, both attitudinal and structural are examined, with examples from banking and other industries. The role of legislation in stimulating questioning of women′s under‐representation in management positions is acknowledged, and the reasons for starting positive action programmes are explored. An explanation is given of these programmes, which are similar to the American affirmative action programmes. How positive action can break down barriers is discussed in relation to the European banks studied. It is concluded that without positive action the position of women at work will deteriorate, but that employers will increasingly become involved in the programmes, as will unions and consultants.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Margery Povall

There are three recurring themes in the media that present three very different images of women—woman as the top executive, (as yet another woman becomes “the first to…”);…

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112

Abstract

There are three recurring themes in the media that present three very different images of women—woman as the top executive, (as yet another woman becomes “the first to…”); woman as the mother who is contributing to unemployment and juvenile delinquency by taking “men's” jobs and woman as the unemployed victim of technological change.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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