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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Abstract

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Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Richa Chaudhary, Santosh Rangnekar and Mukesh Kumar Barua

Improving work engagement can have significant implications for performance at individual, team and organisational level. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving work engagement can have significant implications for performance at individual, team and organisational level. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of occupational self efficacy and human resource development (HRD) climate on work engagement among business executives of select business organisations in India. In addition, it aims to attempt to examine the mediating effect of HRD climate on self efficacy and work engagement relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 150 business executives from both public and private sector manufacturing and service organisations in India. Data were collected through both personal visits and online questionnaires. Correlation and regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses. Specifically, Baron and Kenny's method was used for testing the hypotheses of mediation.

Findings

A significant relationship was found between all variables in the study. All the study hypotheses were supported. HRD climate was found to partially mediate the relationship between occupational self‐efficacy and work engagement. Interestingly, both HRD climate and self‐efficacy affect work engagement both directly and indirectly through influencing the other.

Practical implications

Work engagement requires the workforce that is endorsed with self‐efficacy as dispositional trait. In addition, improving the HRD climate can have significant implications for enhancing the work engagement among Indian business executives.

Originality/value

By investigating the relationship between self‐efficacy, HRD climate and work engagement the present study made an effort to fulfil the gap in academic literature where there is a significant dearth of academic literature on work engagement from developing economies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Arnold B. Bakker and Evangelia Demerouti

The purpose of this paper is to give a state‐of‐the art overview of the Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give a state‐of‐the art overview of the Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model

Design/methodology/approach

The strengths and weaknesses of the demand‐control model and the effort‐reward imbalance model regarding their predictive value for employee well being are discussed. The paper then introduces the more flexible JD‐R model and discusses its basic premises.

Findings

The paper provides an overview of the studies that have been conducted with the JD‐R model. It discusses evidence for each of the model's main propositions. The JD‐R model can be used as a tool for human resource management. A two‐stage approach can highlight the strengths and weaknesses of individuals, work groups, departments, and organizations at large.

Originality/value

This paper challenges existing stress models, and focuses on both negative and positive indicators of employee well being. In addition, it outlines how the JD‐R model can be applied to a wide range of occupations, and be used to improve employee well being and performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Lucy T.B. Rattrie and Markus G. Kittler

The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis and evaluation of literature surrounding the job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti et al., 2001) in the first…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis and evaluation of literature surrounding the job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti et al., 2001) in the first decade since its inception, with particular emphasis on establishing an evidence-based universal application towards different national and international work contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a systematic review approach following the stages suggested by Tranfield et al. (2003). Based on empirical data from 62 studies, the authors systematically analyse the application of the JD-R model and queries whether it is applicable outside merely domestic work contexts.

Findings

The authors find convincing support for the JD-R model in different national contexts. However, the authors also found an absence of studies employing the JD-R model in cross-national settings. None of the empirical studies in the sample had explicitly considered the international context of today’s work environment or had clearly associated JD-R research with the IHRM literature.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the wide acceptance of the JD-R model in domestic work contexts and the increased interest in work-related outcomes such as burnout and engagement in the IHRM literature, the study identifies a gap and suggests future research applying the JD-R model to international work and global mobility contexts.

Originality/value

This study is the first to systematically assess the application of the JD-R model in domestic and international work contexts based on a systematic review of empirical literature in the first decade since the inception of the model. The study identifies a lack of internationally focussed JD-R studies and invites further empirical research and theoretical extensions.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2013

Anja Van den Broeck, Joris Van Ruysseveldt, Els Vanbelle and Hans De Witte

Several job characteristics have been suggested to influence workers’ well-being. For example, Herzberg (1968) differentiated job characteristics that offset…

Abstract

Several job characteristics have been suggested to influence workers’ well-being. For example, Herzberg (1968) differentiated job characteristics that offset dissatisfaction such as social relations from job aspects that foster job satisfaction such as opportunities for advancement. While Hackman and Oldham (1976) focused on the motivational potential of job characteristics such as task identity and feedback, Karasek (1979) accentuated time pressure as a pivotal job demand. Together these models point out that various job characteristics may influence workers’ functioning.

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to integrate leadership into the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. Based on self-determination theory, it was argued that engaging leaders…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate leadership into the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. Based on self-determination theory, it was argued that engaging leaders who inspire, strengthen, and connect their followers would reduce employee’s levels of burnout and increase their levels of work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted among a representative sample of the Dutch workforce (n=1,213) and the research model was tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

It appeared that leadership only had an indirect effect on burnout and engagement – via job demands and job resources – but not a direct effect. Moreover, leadership also had a direct relationship with organizational outcomes such as employability, performance, and commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a cross-sectional design and all variables were based on self-reports. Hence, results should be replicated in a longitudinal study and using more objective measures (e.g. for work performance).

Practical implications

Since engaged leaders, who inspire, strengthen, and connect their followers, provide a work context in which employees thrive, organizations are well advised to promote engaging leadership.

Social implications

Leadership seems to be a crucial factor which has an indirect impact – via job demands and job resources – on employee well-being.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates that engaging leadership can be integrated into the JD-R framework.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Jessica van Wingerden, Arnold B. Bakker and Daantje Derks

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a job demands-resources (JD-R) intervention on psychological capital (PsyCap), job crafting, work engagement, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a job demands-resources (JD-R) intervention on psychological capital (PsyCap), job crafting, work engagement, and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quasi-experimental pre-test-post-test design with a control group. Healthcare professionals (n=67) were assigned to the JD-R intervention or a control group and filled out questionnaires before and after the intervention. To test the hypotheses, multivariate analyses of covariance were conducted.

Findings

Results showed that participants’ PsyCap, job crafting, work engagement, and self-ratings of job performance significantly increased after the JD-R intervention.

Research limitations/implications

Only healthcare professionals participated in the intervention study, which restricts the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The results illustrate that organizations can foster work engagement and improve performance by offering a JD-R intervention aimed at increasing PsyCap and job crafting at work. Organizations should acknowledge the importance of facilitating and stimulating a resourceful and challenging work environment.

Originality/value

This is the first study that examined a JD-R intervention. The results contribute to JD-R theory by offering a first causal test. For the first time, a significant increase of job crafting behaviors after an intervention was found.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Todd D. Smith and Mari-Amanda Dyal

The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a safety-oriented job demands-resources (JD-R) model that supports the notion that excessive job demands in the fire…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and present a safety-oriented job demands-resources (JD-R) model that supports the notion that excessive job demands in the fire service, when not controlled or countered, may increase firefighter burnout and diminish firefighter safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach for the present project includes a review of the JD-R literature and the presentation of a conceptual model specific to fire service organizations.

Findings

A conceptual model, relevant to fire service organizations was derived. The model argues that excessive job demands associated with workload, physical demands, emotional demands, and complexity can result in burnout if not controlled or countered. Safety-specific resources, including recovery, support, safety-specific transformational leadership and safety climate are theorized to buffer these effects and are suggested to enhance firefighter engagement. These effects are argued then to improve firefighter safety. Ultimately, the findings will help guide future research, intervention projects and workplace safety and health management programs and initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper and conceptual model extends the application of the JD-R model to fire service organizations. Further, the conceptual model supports the application of safety-specific job resources vs more traditional job resources as a means to enhance firefighter safety.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Anastasia A. Katou, Michael Koupkas and Eleni Triantafillidou

The purpose of this paper is to integrate an extended by personal resource job demands-resources (JD-R) model in the relationship between transformational leadership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate an extended by personal resource job demands-resources (JD-R) model in the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational performance. It is argued that the responsive, supportive and developmental leader's style will reduce employees' levels of burnout and increase their levels of work engagement and ultimately will increase organizational performance expressed by productivity, growth and creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested among a national sample of 1,011 employees in 107 Greek public and private organizations operating within an environment of economic and financial crises. The operational model was tested using a multilevel structural equation modelling.

Findings

It appeared that job demands and work burnout and job resources and work engagement, serially and fully mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational performance. Further, it is found that personal resources negatively and fully mediate the relationship between job resources and work burnout and positively and partially mediate the relationship between job resources and work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected using a cross-sectional design, not allowing dynamic causal inferences.

Practical implications

Considering that the transformational leadership style reduces employees' levels of burnout and increases their levels of work engagement and accordingly improves organizational performance, organizations are well advised to encourage this leadership style.

Social implications

Transformational leadership by balancing job demands and job resources could have a positive impact on employee well-being.

Originality/value

The study, using multilevel testing, demonstrates that the extended JD-R model can be integrated into the transformational leadership– organizational performance relationship.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Qiao Hu, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Toon W. Taris

The purpose of this paper is to differentiate between two types of job resources (i.e. task resources and social resources) and extends the job demands-resources (JD-R

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to differentiate between two types of job resources (i.e. task resources and social resources) and extends the job demands-resources (JD-R) model with a typically Chinese form of social exchange – guanxi exchange – to increase its applicability in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Multigroup structural equation analysis was used to test the hypotheses in two cross-sectional Chinese samples of 463 police officers and 261 nurses.

Findings

Results supported the distinction between social resources and task resources. Social resources were positively related to engagement and organizational commitment (for police officers), task resources were positively related to engagement (for both nurses and police officers), organizational commitment (for police officers), and negatively to burnout (for police officers). Guanxi exchange with supervisors was positively associated with social resources (for both nurses and police officers), task resources (for nurses), and organizational commitment (for police officers). Moreover, guanxi exchange was positively related with work engagement in both nurses and police officers. Unexpectedly, guanxi exchange was positively related with burnout in police officers.

Research limitations/implications

Due to its cross-sectional design, longitudinal replication of the findings is desirable in order to establish causality.

Practical implications

The effects of informal interpersonal relations (i.e. guanxi exchange) on employees’ well-being and organizational commitment should be acknowledged, especially when developing strategies to reduce burnout and increase work engagement.

Originality/value

For the first time, task resources and social resources are distinguished and a Chinese traditional concept (guanxi exchange) is integrated into the JD-R model.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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