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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Khaldoun I. Ababneh and Mohammed A. Al-Waqfi

Building on organizational justice and privacy literatures, the purpose of this paper is to test a model capturing the impacts of potentially inappropriate/discriminatory…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on organizational justice and privacy literatures, the purpose of this paper is to test a model capturing the impacts of potentially inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions on job applicant perceptions and behavioral intentions in a developing economy context with a multicultural workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design using senior undergraduate students (n=221) seeking or about to seek jobs in the United Arab Emirates was used to examine interviewees’ reactions to inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions. A questionnaire was used to collect the data. Structural equation modeling and bootstrapping were used for data analysis and hypothesis testing.

Findings

This study demonstrates that inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions influence privacy invasion perceptions, which in turn influence job applicants’ fairness perceptions and behavioral intentions. This study also demonstrates that privacy invasion perceptions fully mediate the effect of inappropriate/discriminatory employment interview questions on fairness perceptions. Moreover, the findings show that privacy invasion directly and indirectly, via fairness perceptions, influence litigation intentions. On the other hand, findings of this study indicate that privacy invasion influence organizational attractiveness and recommendation intentions only indirectly, via fairness perceptions.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the impact of inappropriate/discriminatory interview questions on applicant reactions in a developing economy context with social, cultural, and legal environment that is different from those prevailing in developed Western societies. This study demonstrates that privacy invasion is an important mechanism to understand job applicant reactions to inappropriate interview questions.

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Cristina M. Giannantonio, Amy E. Hurley-Hanson, Sharon L. Segrest, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the effects of recruiter friendliness and both verifiable and non-verifiable job attributes in the recruitment process.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 498 participants watched a videoed simulation of a recruitment interview and completed a questionnaire. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the interaction and main effect hypotheses.

Findings

Applicant reactions were more favorable with a friendly recruiter. The more favorable the verifiable job attribute information (JAI), the more favorable the applicant reactions were to the employment opportunity. Compared to applicants who received negative or no non-verifiable JAI, applicants who received positive or mixed non-verifiable JAI were more attracted to the recruiter, perceived the employment opportunity as more desirable, and were more willing to pursue the employment opportunity. Reactions were most favorable in the positive non-verifiable JAI condition, less favorable in the mixed condition, and least favorable in the negative condition. Surprisingly, the “no information” mean was above the negative information condition.

Originality/value

This fully crossed 2 × 3 × 4 experiment simultaneously examined 2 levels of recruiter friendliness, 3 levels of verifiable job attributes and 4 levels of non-verifiable job attributes. The five dependent variables were attraction to the recruiter, attraction to the employment opportunity, willingness to pursue the employment opportunity, the perceived probability of receiving a job offer and the number of positive inferences made about unknown organizational characteristics. Previous research examining the effects of employment inducements and job attributes were conducted in field settings where it is difficult to control the amount and favorability of JAI applicants receive.

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Debora Jeske and Kenneth S. Shultz

The purpose of this paper is to pursue several goals: first, what is the relationship between perceived respect for privacy and potential job pursuit of student applicants

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to pursue several goals: first, what is the relationship between perceived respect for privacy and potential job pursuit of student applicants in a hypothetical application scenario which includes social media screening as part of the selection process? Second, if the job involves vulnerable others, what are the implications for privacy perceptions? And third, to what extent does the use of social media for non-work purposes relate to perceived respect for privacy?

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional sampling approach, data were collected from 388 student participants in two different data collection rounds via an online survey.

Findings

Perceived respect for privacy was positively correlated, and information privacy concern was negatively correlated, with job pursuit intention. However, perceived respect for privacy differed across the different jobs. Specifically, respect for privacy was higher when the employer screened social media for jobs involving explicit work with children. Social media use and content effects also emerged. Those who either observed others online or interacted with others online to socialize reported lower respect for privacy. Participants with more sensitive content online and content they would be unwilling to share also reported lower scores for privacy.

Research limitations/implications

The results were based on cross-sectional data, correlational analyses and hypothetical job scenarios due to ethical considerations and causal restrictions in what may be bi-directional effects.

Originality/value

The current study adds to the limited research on the negative effects of social media screening by employers on applicant reactions and the role of job-specifics on how applicant may react to screening.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Leah Joyce Ellison, Tara McClure Johnson, David Tomczak, Alina Siemsen and Manuel Francisco Gonzalez

The use of game-based assessments (GBAs) is growing in selection contexts, yet test-takers have varying reactions to such assessments, which have important implications…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of game-based assessments (GBAs) is growing in selection contexts, yet test-takers have varying reactions to such assessments, which have important implications for applicant behavior. This paper reviews the literature on applicant reactions and explores classic assessment models in the context of GBAs, identifying best practice recommendations and pitfalls for enhancing the candidate experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 374 participants from MTurk completed cognitive GBAs and questionnaires regarding test-taker reactions (job-relatedness, perceived opportunity to perform, provision of selection information, face validity, task engagement, task motivation and willingness to refer others to the company), technology self-efficacy, and game/technology experience.

Findings

Fairness mediated the relationship between procedural justice rules and willingness to recommend the company to others. Technology self-efficacy was significantly related to fairness perceptions and procedural justice perceptions. Males had significantly higher procedural justice perceptions of GBAs than females.

Research limitations/implications

The study underscores the importance of considering fairness perceptions and individual differences in reactions to GBAs. Future research should study participants within high-stakes hiring situations and examine other individual difference factors such as ethnicity.

Practical implications

GBAs are a viable assessment method for personnel selection, yet organizations must recognize that individuals are more likely to respond positively to GBAs if they perceive such assessments as fair and job-related, and perceive themselves as capable of performing well on the assessment.

Originality/value

This study tests a classic model of procedural fairness in a novel and timely assessment context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Barry Goldman, Dylan Cooper and Tamar Kugler

A surprisingly large proportion of the working population of the USA consists of individuals with felony convictions. Moreover, the issue of employability of these…

Abstract

Purpose

A surprisingly large proportion of the working population of the USA consists of individuals with felony convictions. Moreover, the issue of employability of these individuals is compounded for minorities. This paper aims to present two experimental studies investigating whether minorities with felony backgrounds have a more difficult time being selected for employment than identically situated white applicants. The authors ground the paper in realistic group conflict theory. Results indicate discrimination is more acute against minorities with felony backgrounds than whites with the same background and shed light on the mechanisms leading to this discrimination. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper involves two experimental studies involving working adults engaging with realistic survey situations using mTurk.

Findings

Results of both studies indicate discrimination is more acute against minorities with felony backgrounds than whites with the same background, and shed light on the mechanisms leading to this discrimination.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the methodology is that the authors used fictional candidates and jobs. This may have led to understating the effects of discrimination on minorities because it allowed applicants to answer in socially desirable ways (e.g. absent of racial bias) without suffering any of the anticipated negative consequences of actually hiring individuals about whom they hold negative stereotypes.

Practical implications

This research has several important implications for practice. First, organizations should be keenly aware of the potential for subtle and unconscious bias to affect the job application process even among well-intentioned hiring managers. Second, as the bias is often triggered by threats, organizations should share with their employees the nature of the threat involved with former felons.

Social implications

Organizations should deliberately address issues associated with the use of criminal background checks. For many organizations, a felony conviction in an applicant’s background automatically eliminates that person from employment. However, a substantial amount of the workforce now has a felony in their background. Indeed, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (2012) has issued guidelines that detail important factors that organizations should consider on a case-by-case basis when considering employment for former felons. Organizations may consider updating any blanket exclusions regarding the hiring of ex-felons – not only because it makes good policy but also because it may help the organization hire the best people.

Originality/value

This research studies an important – and growing – societal problem related to the hiring of convicted felons, and the related issue of racial discrimination that affects black convicted felons particularly hard. There has been very little work in the management area on this topic. Moreover, there has been very little work in all areas that includes experimental methods. The use of such methods is particularly useful to eliminate confounds found in field data.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Arpita Agnihotri and Saurabh Bhattacharya

The purpose of this paper is to explore a conceptual model on the influence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) “fit” on organizational attractiveness among job

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a conceptual model on the influence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) “fit” on organizational attractiveness among job applicants under the boundary conditions of chief executive officer (CEO) activism and CSR credibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on archival research, largely reviewing extant in CSR and drawing propositions based on existing theory.

Findings

Paper draws propositions based on CSR fit, credibility and CEO activism. The paper asserts the influence of CSR fit on organizational attractiveness among job applicants. It further explains moderated mediating mechanism through which CSR fit influences organizational attractiveness among job applicants.

Originality/value

Recruitment has primarily explored the role of CSR in attracting potential job candidates. This paper presents the role of CSR “fit,” an aspect not explored before in recruitment. This paper also introduces the role of CEO activism in recruitment.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Diane Lawong, Gerald R. Ferris, Wayne Hochwarter and Liam Maher

Researchers have identified various recruiter and organization characteristics that individually influence staffing effectiveness. In extending contemporary research, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have identified various recruiter and organization characteristics that individually influence staffing effectiveness. In extending contemporary research, the purpose of this paper is to address a straightforward question unexamined in previous research, namely, does recruiter political skill interact with organization reputation to influence applicant attraction in the recruitment process? Specifically, the authors hypothesized that for recruiters high in political skill, as organization reputation increases, applicant attraction to the organization increases. Alternatively, for recruiters low in political skill, as organization reputation increases, there is no change in applicant attraction to the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted to create the experimental manipulation materials, pilot test them and then conduct tests of the hypotheses. Study 1 created and tested the content validity of the recruiter political skill script. Study 2 reported on the effectiveness of the recruiter political skill experimental manipulation, whereby a male actor was hired to play the part of a recruiter high in political skill and one low in political skill. Finally, Study 3 was the primary hypothesis testing investigation.

Findings

Results from a 2×2 between-subjects experimental study (N=576) supported the hypotheses. Specifically, high recruiter political skill and favorable organization reputation each demonstrated significant main effects on applicant attraction to the organization. Additionally, the authors hypothesized, and confirmed, a significant organization reputation × recruiter political skill interaction. Specifically, findings demonstrated that increases in organization reputation resulted in increased applicant attraction to the organization for those exposed to a recruiter high in political skill. However, the effect was not for a recruiter low in political skill.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the single source nature of data collections, the authors took steps to minimize potential biasing factors (e.g. time separation, including affectivity). Future research will benefit from gathering multiple sources of data. In addition, no experimental research to date exists, examining political skill in a laboratory context. This finding has important implications for the growing research base on political skill in organizations.

Practical implications

First impressions are lasting impressions, and it is very costly to organizations when recruiters lose good candidates due to the failure to make a memorable and favorable impression. This paper supports the use of political skill in the recruitment process and highlights its capability to influence and attract job applicants to organizations successfully.

Originality/value

Despite its scientific and practical appeal, the causal effects of political skill on important work outcomes in an experimental setting have not been formally investigated. As the first experimental investigation of political skill, the authors can see more clearly and precisely what political skill behaviors of recruiters tend to influence applicant attraction to organizations in the recruitment process.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Christopher A. Ballweg, William H. Ross, Davide Secchi and Chad Uting

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and influence of social network website (SNW) content about alcohol use and abuse on job applicant reactions to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and influence of social network website (SNW) content about alcohol use and abuse on job applicant reactions to their prospective immediate supervisor and toward applying for the job.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, raters coded photographs and photo captions found on 1,048 personal SNWs of US managers or business owners. Approximately 22 percent of managers’ personal SNWs contained references to alcohol, providing a base rate large enough to warrant further research. In Study 2, laboratory experiment participants saw a fictitious company’s website including a professional managerial profile. A 3 × 3 factorial design then varied whether the prospective manager’s comments on his personal SNW emphasized professional activities, social drinking, or alcohol abuse; also, the manager’s friends’ comments emphasized work activities, social drinking, or alcohol abuse. A control group did not see a personal SNW.

Findings

Alcohol abuse information on personal SNWs – whether posted by the manager or by the manager’s friends – negatively affected attitudes toward the manager. Alcohol abuse information posted by the manager (but not by the manager’s friends) decreased the willingness of participants to apply for the position. These findings were consistent with the Brunswick Lens Model and the warranting hypothesis.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate managerial SNW content and it effects upon prospective job seekers’ attitudes.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Astin D. Vick and George Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to examine bias among White raters against racial minority women seeking employment in fitness organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine bias among White raters against racial minority women seeking employment in fitness organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a 2 (applicant perceived racial identity) × 2 (applicant race) × 2 (hiring directive) factorial design experiment, with participant rater gender serving as the within-subjects variable. Adults in the USA (n=238) who had or were currently working in the fitness industry participated in the study.

Findings

Results indicate that applicant presumed racial identity and rater gender had direct effects, while applicant presumed racial identity, applicant race and rater gender had interactive effects, as well.

Originality/value

Results show that perceived racial identity affects raters’ view of job applicants, and the pattern of findings varies among racial groups.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

John Bret Becton, H. Jack Walker, J. Bruce Gilstrap and Paul H. Schwager

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how HR professionals use social networking website information to evaluate applicants’ propensity to engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how HR professionals use social networking website information to evaluate applicants’ propensity to engage in counterproductive work behaviors and suitability for hire.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental design, 354 HR professionals participated in a two-part study. In part 1, participants viewed a fictitious resume and rated the applicant’s likelihood to engage in counterproductive work behavior as well as likelihood of a hiring recommendation. In part 2, participants viewed a fictitious social networking website profile for the applicant and repeated the ratings from part 1. The authors analyzed their responses to determine the effect viewing a social network website (SNW) profile had on ratings of the applicant.

Findings

Unprofessional SNW information negatively affected ratings of applicants regardless of applicants’ qualifications, while professional SNW profile information failed to improve evaluations regardless of qualifications.

Originality/value

Anecdotal reports suggest that many employers use SNW information to eliminate job applicants from consideration despite an absence of empirical research that has examined how SNW content influences HR recruiters’ evaluation of job applicants. This study represents one of the first attempts to understand how HR professionals use such information in screening applicants. The findings suggest that unprofessional SNW profiles negatively influence recruiter evaluations while professional SNW profile content has little to no effect on evaluations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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