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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Job Taiwo Gbadegesin, Samson Ojekalu, Taiwo Frances Gbadegesin and Markson Opeyemi Komolafe

This paper empirically provides information on community-driven infrastructure provision through the collective efforts of community-based organizations (CBOs). It offers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically provides information on community-driven infrastructure provision through the collective efforts of community-based organizations (CBOs). It offers an insight into emerging events on community-based infrastructure procurement, scholarship and, creating gaps for new frontiers of knowledge on community development research agenda in the emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

It is drawn upon community-based associations, herein referred to as landlords-landladies community association (LLCAs) – representatives of households in the communities. After interviewing the key members of the groups, we administered copies of the semi-structured questionnaire randomly on the enumerated regular members of sampled seventeen LLCAs. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

Planning for a sustainable community, protection and security necessity and Government inadequate attention on emerging communities over the years are the main reasons for the joint decision. Electrification, drainage and road top the lists of the projects executed. Major challenges included diversity and inclusiveness. Development projects' design, execution and commission contribute to performance. Also, LLCAs' clarity of duties and purposes and tenure/duration of officials contribute to the overall membership satisfaction on governance structure and leadership.

Research limitations/implications

It is limited to the specific reasons for collective efforts, challenges of the participatory movement, membership satisfaction on governance and infrastructure recently procured in the communities. Frontier of studies should be extended to enabling factors.

Practical implications

Findings from this study indicate that community-driven governance with the support of the government enhances community-based infrastructure.

Social implications

Potential values of collective action embellished in the concepts of a social movement, active engagement, communalism, grassroots efforts, social cohesion and planning in bringing peoples of diversities together for common goals with less rigorous formalization.

Originality/value

The novelty of the research is the exposition on the evidence-based innovative concept of integrating the social practice of participatory design, representing a bottom-up model into infrastructure procurement in community settings.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Alfred Larm Teye, Jan de Haan, Marja Geessiena Elsinga, Francis Kwesi Bondinuba and Job Taiwo Gbadegesin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the risk factors in homeowners from the individual household’s perspectives within the owner-occupied housing sector of The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the risk factors in homeowners from the individual household’s perspectives within the owner-occupied housing sector of The Netherlands. Risk in home ownership from mortgage providers’ perspectives has received tremendous attention than individual home owner’s perspectives in existing literature following the financial crisis in 2007/2008 within the euro zone.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a broader review of extent literature on the different concepts and views on risk in homeownership. These concepts are unified into a framework that enhances our understanding of the perceived sophisticated risk in owner-occupier with focus on The Netherlands.

Findings

From the perspective of the homeowner, two main types of risks were identified: default payment and property price risk. The paper has unearthed a quantum number of factors which underline the above risks. These factors relate to the initial amount of mortgage loan taken out, the future housing expenses and the income development of the owner-occupier. Family disintegration is identified, as one of the main causes of mortgage default and that of property price risk are mainly influenced by income levels, interest rates and conditions in the social and private rental sectors.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of the paper are based on review of the extant literature in the context of the Dutch housing market. Possible rigorous situational analysis using other tools are recommended for further research.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the much needed body of knowledge in the owner-occupied sector and provides a better understanding of risk in home ownership from the individual perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Sunday Olarinre Oladokun and Job Taiwo Gbadegesin

Real estate professionals are a vital resource to the property firms and the industry at large. Employees’ skills, knowledge and competence contribute in great measure to…

Abstract

Purpose

Real estate professionals are a vital resource to the property firms and the industry at large. Employees’ skills, knowledge and competence contribute in great measure to organization’s business performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the adequacy of core knowledge and soft skills possessed by professional employees within the Nigerian real estate practicing firms. It also assesses the performance of the employees and establishes the correlation among the soft skills possessed by employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were elicited through the administration of questionnaires on principal partners/branch managers (the employers) of the practicing estate surveying and valuation firms in Lagos metropolis. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics, one-sample t-test and correlation analysis.

Findings

The result indicates that employees of estate firms in Nigeria demonstrate adequate knowledge in ten out of 21 core areas of real estate practice, while real estate agency has the highest mean, and inadequate knowledge in six others with least mean score in environmental impact assessment. The study also revealed that employees possess good listening and communication skills but are deficient in courteousness and writing skill, among others. It was also found that real estate employees were performing the best in inspection functions but below average in report writing and handling of transaction. The study also established a significant relationship among all the soft skills except communication skill and courteousness.

Research limitations/implications

Further study that looks at the performance of real estate graduates working in other sectors/organizations other than estate companies is required to establish their competence level in global employment market. Further study is also needed to cover the views of the employees in Nigerian market as this study focuses on the views of the employers.

Originality/value

This study provides an important feedback for the policy makers in the design/review of curriculum for real estate education towards enhancing employability of the graduates. This study also serves as the research blueprint in giving attention to assessment of soft skills among real estate employees in Nigerian real estate industry.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Markson Opeyemi Komolafe, Matthew Oluwole Oyewole and Job Taiwo Gbadegesin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative awareness and influence of stakeholders on sustainable residential property development in Lagos, Nigeria. This is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative awareness and influence of stakeholders on sustainable residential property development in Lagos, Nigeria. This is with a view to identifying the key stakeholders pertinent to enhancing sustainable residential property development in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on awareness and influence of stakeholders on decisions to adopt sustainable residential property were elicited from residential property users, building contractors, property investors, estate surveyors and valuers and government regulatory agencies in Lagos residential property sector. The data were collected by using a questionnaire and analysed using mean item score and analysis of variance.

Findings

The result showed that the government regulatory agencies and the building professionals were aware of sustainable buildings, as mean scores measuring their awareness were higher than 2.5 on a scale of 1–5. The level of awareness of users was, however, low (mean score of 2.39). The users and the government regulatory agencies were identified by the stakeholders as being most influential on their decisions to adopt sustainable residential property.

Practical implications

Findings from this study indicate that there is need to promote the users and government regulatory agencies’ activities on sustainable residential property development as the activities of these stakeholders have higher influence on sustainable residential property development decisions in the study area.

Originality/value

This study particularly examines the interrelationships between the activities of stakeholders in sustainable residential property development in Nigeria. This has not been adequately studied in extant literature.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Timothy Tunde Oladokun and Job Taiwo Gbadegesin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting academic performance of real estate students in a developing country like Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting academic performance of real estate students in a developing country like Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected with the aid of questionnaire served on 152 final year real estate students of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife and Federal University of Technology Akure, in southwestern Nigeria. Data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

Findings show that the factors relating to academic assessment, parent/family background and teaching methods or techniques have more impact on students’ academic performance, while school and general academic environment had less influence on students’ academic performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study complements the body of knowledge regarding the factors influencing real estate students’ academic performance from the point of view of an emerging economy where issues of socioeconomic, academic and training perspectives differ from what obtains in advanced economies.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few attempts at establishing factors that influence real estate students’ performance, especially from an emerging economy like Nigeria.

Details

Property Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Job Taiwo Gbadegesin, Harry van der Heijden and Peter Boelhouwer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature and dimension of non-compliance (defiance) with lease agreement obligations in private rental housing market between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature and dimension of non-compliance (defiance) with lease agreement obligations in private rental housing market between managers (agents/private rental housing providers or landlords) and end-users (tenants – rental housing consumers), with a view to identifying challenges in rental housing lease administration in Nigeria emerging rental market.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative data collected from practicing estate surveyor and valuers (statutorily registered agents), who manage private rental housing in their portfolios on behalf of owners and tenants, who occupy rental housing within Lagos state (the largest property market in Nigeria and West Africa). Using a theoretical model in the context of five lease agreement obligations, data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (one sample t-test, independent t-test and correlation).

Findings

While economic circumstances (economic factors) are considered the major vulnerable factor that cause acts of non-compliance, defiance against “covenant not- to- sublet (subletting covenant (SC))” and “prompt rental payment covenant” are the two most non-compliance attitudes (precipitation events) observed from both actors. There is correlation among all vulnerability elements and precipitating events. While a significant relationship was only observed between “SC” and all vulnerability elements on the part of agents, there is significant relationship among all the vulnerability elements and precipitating events on the part of tenants. Also, while tenants attached higher significance to all the vulnerability factors than managers, both actors attached different level of priority to precipitating events. Lastly, equitable remedies and peaceful entry are the two most adopted intervention tools.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to seeking both the professional opinion of licensed/registered agents and the rental housing consumers-tenants.

Practical implications

The research points to an increasing need for the stakeholders – Estate Surveyors and Valuers Registration Board of Nigeria (a Government parastatal) and the Nigerian Institutions of Estate Surveyors and Valuers (the constituted professional body), to establish and reform the code of practice in this direction with due consideration to the factors identified in this study. Effort also should be upgraded in the intervention techniques adopted in order to improve on emerging rental market.

Originality/value

The paper explores an important aspect of lease administration in private rental housing market. It also provides platform on which the acts of defiance can be wiped out in the emerging rental market.

Details

Property Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Sunday Julius Odediran, Job Taiwo Gbadegesin and Mujidat Olubola Babalola

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the diffusion of facilities management (FM) as a sustainable tool to facility performance within the perspective of public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the diffusion of facilities management (FM) as a sustainable tool to facility performance within the perspective of public universities in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature reveals the practices of FM in both the educational and institutional buildings. Factors influencing the practices and strategies for sustaining facilities condition were evaluated. Data were collected through a well-structured questionnaire administered on both the technical and managerial officers in charge of FM in Nigeria public universities. Data collected were subjected to both the descriptive and inferential statistical tools.

Findings

The FM practice in the Nigeria public universities is found to be lagging behind private sector experience, despite the significant benefits of FM to learning process. In particular, passive actions are being taken to manage facilities, even when most are obsolete and deteriorated. Critical challenges to FM practice are low level of technology, poor funding and poor policy implementation. Outsourcing of technical personnel is essential to ameliorate the conditions of public universities’ facilities in Nigeria.

Practical implications

This paper helps policymakers and administrators to know the condition of facilities and understand the FM practice in the Nigerian public universities.

Originality/value

Reactive/passive practice is the norm in FM of public universities in Nigeria. However, outsourcing of technical personnel in FM has a great potential for functional facilities in public universities.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

JOB TAIWO GBADEGESIN and Theophilus Olugbenga Babatunde

This paper aims to empirically investigate the factors and the level of influence on facilities management practice and analyze the relationship among the factors. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically investigate the factors and the level of influence on facilities management practice and analyze the relationship among the factors. It also examines the level of effectiveness of outsourcing decision. Recent research effort on outsourcing identified some factors that influence outsourcing decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

Copies of instrument titled “Questionnaire on Outsourcing Decision” designed through a review of outsourcing literature, pilot-tested on the professionals, with valid reliability test results, were used to collect data. Collected data were analyzed using percentage, t-test, Pearson correlation and chi-square.

Findings

Majority of the respondents reported that outsourcing is an effective decision. Except for functional characteristics, all other factors (strategic, management, technical, economical and quality) are significantly different from the group mean values. While there is a positive and significant relationship among the influencing factors, there is no significant relationship between the years of experience and the perception on the effectiveness of outsourcing decision.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to five selected tertiary institutions. The justification for their selection is attributed to their relative adequate infrastructural facilities, the existing practice of outsourcing and the size of the institutions. The further frontier of knowledge can be extended from here.

Practical implications

The findings exposed the policymakers and stakeholders in the public universities to the major factors that affect the effectiveness of outsourcing and the direction for future practical research in the area of facilities management within the tertiary institutions of learning.

Originality/value

The thrust of this paper provides check and balance in the adoption of outsourcing approach with tested instrument that ranks the influencing factors in facilities management practice in a developing economy within educational institutions.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2014

Job Taiwo Gbadegesin and Bioye Tajudeen Aluko

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that influence the adoption of private finance initiatives (PFIs) for infrastructure projects in tertiary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that influence the adoption of private finance initiatives (PFIs) for infrastructure projects in tertiary institutions of learning. It also determines the relationship between the levels of awareness, years of experience and the identified factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were gathered from administration of questionnaires. The instruments were administered after validation on the stakeholders in the concerned departments. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive, cluster and correlation analyses.

Findings

There is a high level of awareness and experience in public private partnerships (PPPs) among the respondents on the initiative. It is found that nature of project, risk involvement and the technical capabilities are the three most influential factors. There is correlation between the identified factors. There is also a significant relationship between the respondents’ years of experience in PPP and “technical capabilities factors.”

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to four selected public tertiary institutions in a single geo-political zone (six states) in southwestern Nigeria, out of four geo-political zones in Nigeria. Southwestern Nigeria is a major zone where tertiary institutions embrace PPP/PFIs initiative.

Practical implications

Empirically, PPPs in the educational sector of a developing economy have been explored and consequently implied that there is a relationship among the factors that determine the adoption of PPP. Hence, findings would be useful for the policy makers and stakeholders on decision relating to infrastructure provision in tertiary institutions.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few empirical studies in relation to educational sector in developing/emerging economies on the subject of PPP/PFIs for infrastructure projects.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Job Taiwo Gbadegesin and Olatoye Ojo

The purpose of this study is to investigate the presence of ethnic bias in residential tenancy and the relationship between ethnic bias tendency of property…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the presence of ethnic bias in residential tenancy and the relationship between ethnic bias tendency of property managers/landlords and their demographic features.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were gathered from administration of questionnaires, designed with items measuring bias tendency and the driving factors on the perceived wave of discrimination on residential tenancy. The structured questionnaires were administered on an intact sample of licensed property managers/agents (practicing Estate Surveyors and Valuers) at annual Mandatory Continuing Professional Development Programme (MCPD) held in metropolitan Ibadan, the largest indigenous city in West Africa and one of the commercial nerve‐centres in the country. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive analysis, chi square and factor analysis.

Findings

The study confirmed a significant relationship between the ethnic status of the principal managers (managing directors) who were mainly Yoruba aliens and the tenants selected to fill vacancies, which implies that there is presence of ethnic discrimination in tenant selection in the area. It is also confirmed that landlord/property manager (agents) experience, environmental influence and landlord/property manager preference are the most driving factors for discriminating against tenants in the city. It is further revealed that there is a significant relationship between two demographic features; professional qualifications and ages of the property managers’ firms and bias tendency.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the metropolitan city of Ibadan, a city with expatriates and diverse ethnic groups working at different sectors of the economy. Further research and statistical tests that covers all the 36 capital cities of the country are required to examine the tenancy nature of other classes of property.

Practical implications

The implication of the study to the practice is reinforced by the consensus character of the study with the professional body (property managers). Insight and findings prove useful in developing a blueprint for curbing acts of discrimination which needs to be well addressed in property management practice. It implies that effective property rights that protect the rights and rental market planning policy in the developing nations require further reform.

Originality/value

Emphasis on tenants’ rights, campaign against racism and discrimination in the developing nations which support equal housing right for all races is the feature and uniqueness of this study.

Details

Property Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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