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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2023

Ha-Won Jang, Joanne Jung-Eun Yoo and Meehee Cho

Blockchain technology has created possibilities for environmental supply chain sustainability and climate protection. However, because of its early development stage…

Abstract

Purpose

Blockchain technology has created possibilities for environmental supply chain sustainability and climate protection. However, because of its early development stage, users tend to resist the adoption of this new technology. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of resistance on blockchain adoption intentions in the context of the foodservice industry. This study further explores if public pressures and climate change awareness could possibly weaken the negative relationships between blockchain resistance and adoption intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from managers and full-time employees in the foodservice industry, using an online research panel survey. A structural equation model was developed and tested to examine the hypothesized relationships. Additionally, a multi-group analysis was performed to test the moderating roles of public pressures and climate change awareness.

Findings

The findings from this study confirmed that foodservice employees’ characteristics, including traditional barriers, and blockchain technology factors, like perceived risk, are both significant in forming resistance to blockchain. This study also demonstrated the significant roles of internal and external stakeholders in weakening the negative associations between blockchain resistance and adoption intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study recommends that foodservice companies address how to reduce their employees’ negative perceptions about changes imposed by blockchain adoption. This study also suggests the joint consideration of the pressures from internal and external stakeholders to provide continued insights into developing environmental practices for the foodservice industry.

Originality/value

This study extends the theoretical underpinning of the innovation resistance theory by incorporating the stakeholder theory as a strong foundation for understanding how external pressures and internal awareness may influence foodservice employees’ responses to the implementation of blockchain technology to mitigate climate change.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2022

Eunyoo Jang, Joanne Jung-Eun Yoo and Meehee Cho

As commercial cooking is known as a source that generates great concentrations of particulate matter (PM) emissions first accumulating in kitchens before spreading to…

Abstract

Purpose

As commercial cooking is known as a source that generates great concentrations of particulate matter (PM) emissions first accumulating in kitchens before spreading to dining areas, this study aims to explore how to improve restaurants’ efforts to reduce PM emissions by the application of attribution theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from restaurant managers operating their business in South Korea, considered to be qualified to provide accurate information regarding the survey questions. A scenario-based experimental approach was used to test the hypothesized relationships. Cognitive and emotional risk judgements were assessed for its potential interaction effects on the relationships between restaurant perceptions of PM source attributions, preventions attitudes and mitigation behavioral intentions.

Findings

Results revealed that perceptions of PM main sources were attributed to internal rather than external factors, which improved mitigation behavioral intentions. Such an effect was partially mediated through PM pollution prevention attitudes. Additionally, when applying external source attributions, PM mitigation behavioral intentions were improved by cognitive risk judgements, and PM prevention attitudes were enhanced by affective risk judgements.

Research limitations/implications

Results assist restaurants to better understand their operations that may be emitting significant levels of PM, thereby encouraging them to set more ambitious and effective PM mitigation operational guidelines for their employees and diners.

Originality/value

This study provides a fundamental baseline of management perceptions regarding PM emissions related to restaurant mitigation behavioral intentions. Results are useful in designing appropriate communication strategies addressing restaurant PM pollution issues to improve internal restaurant practices regarding clean air quality.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2022

Joanne Jung-Eun Yoo, Junkyu Park and Meehee Cho

Following previous research highlighting the importance of gastronomy experience through cooking classes, this study aims to explore the relationships among gastronomy…

Abstract

Purpose

Following previous research highlighting the importance of gastronomy experience through cooking classes, this study aims to explore the relationships among gastronomy experience, cocreation, experience satisfaction, subjective well-being (SWB) and quality of life (QOL).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from domestic tourists who attended the Korean temple food cooking classes. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to verify the hypothesized relationships. The degree of cocreation was also tested for its potential moderating role on the relationships between gastronomy experience and experience satisfaction using a multigroup analysis.

Findings

Results revealed the strong and positive effects of the four dimensions of gastronomy experience on satisfaction. Furthermore, experience satisfaction was found to indirectly influence QOL through SWB. The effects of the education and entertainment experiences on satisfaction were found to be more positive in the high degree of cocreation group compared with the low degree of cocreation group. However, the influence of the escapism experience on satisfaction was greater in those less involved with the cocreated experiential activity.

Research limitations/implications

Findings may assist tourism marketers and local stakeholders to better understand the nature of gastronomy experiences and the importance of cocreation when designing and promoting gastronomy tourism experiences.

Originality/value

This study introduced an integrative framework that provides a better knowledge of the cocreated experience in the context of gastronomy tourism, and this model may be useful in designing impactful gastronomy experiences that lead to true value cocreation and consequently enhancing QOL.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Meehee Cho and Joanne Jung-Eun Yoo

Today’s consumers are aware of restaurants’ effects on the environment and pressure them to implement green practices. As restaurant success largely depends on how…

1099

Abstract

Purpose

Today’s consumers are aware of restaurants’ effects on the environment and pressure them to implement green practices. As restaurant success largely depends on how employees meet customer expectations, employee green creative behavior (EGCB) is critical. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how to enhance EGCB by integrating a comprehensive set of three-dimensional components: external, organizational and individual factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data analysis was conducted using responses from full-time employees in the US restaurant industry. The PROCESS macro was used to test the direct and indirect relationships between the study variables. A series of mediation analyzes were conducted to investigate the mediation effects of “restaurant ethical standards” and “employee green passion” on their relationships to “customer pressure” and EGCB.

Findings

The results verified a direct effect of “customer pressure” on “restaurant ethical standards” and EGCB. The study also demonstrated positive direct relationships of “restaurant ethical standards” – “employee green passion” and “employee green passion” – EGCB. The result showed that “restaurant ethical standards” and “employee green passion” sequentially explained the partial impact of “customer pressure” on EGCB.

Practical implications

The study recommends that restaurant managers acknowledge growing customer environmentalism and prepare to address their customers’ stricter green requirements. Restaurants need to review their ethical standards on a regular basis to meet rising customer pressure. The study also offers empirical evidence regarding the importance of selecting employees who are passionate about sustainability and empowering them to encourage their green creative behavior.

Originality/value

Although past studies have introduced various determinants of employee creative behavior, they have mainly focused on organizational and individual-level factors but have ignored a critical external factor, which is customer pressure. The study addresses this research gap by investigating the interrelationships between customer pressure and EGCB through restaurant ethical standards (organizational-level) and employee green passion (individual-level).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Joanne Jung-Eun Yoo and Meehee Cho

As the event industry is supported by a wide range of suppliers that provide different products and services, all these partners in the supply chain can play a crucial…

1120

Abstract

Purpose

As the event industry is supported by a wide range of suppliers that provide different products and services, all these partners in the supply chain can play a crucial role in green practices. The industry needs to have a sufficient degree of supply chain flexibility to cater to the demands in today’s dynamic environment and the flexibility in the supply chain will help event businesses to be sustainable. This study aims to explore the role of the supply chain flexibility fit between event planner’s requirements and supplier offerings on the implementation of green practices. The study also attempted to provide insights into the adoption of green event practices by identifying the moderating roles of green organization image and public pressure.

Design/methodology/approach

Data analysis was conducted based on 207 useable responses from event planners. Polynomial regression and response surface analysis were performed to verify the hypothesized relationships. Additionally, hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the moderating effects of green organization image and public pressure on the proposed relationships.

Findings

Results revealed that product flexibility fit was positively related to green practices; however, such effect was not found in the volume flexibility fit model. Findings also showed that public pressure significantly improved the positive effect of product flexibility fit on green practices. However, the green organization image was found to have no significant moderating effect.

Practical implications

The adoption of green practices requires well-designed collaboration among supply chain partners. This study offers empirical evidence regarding the importance of achieving product flexibility fit between event planners’ requirements and supplier offerings when conducting green practices. The findings provide useful implications that can be applied for successful green event management.

Originality/value

Despite the significance and relevance of the topic, barely any study has been conducted to assess supply chain flexibility and its relationship with green event practices. The study adopted resource orchestration theory to examine the role of supply chain flexibility on green event practices by focusing on the planner-supplier flexibility fit. A number of implications regarding supply chain management and future research are identified.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Joanne Jung‐Eun Yoo and Kaye Chon

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether factors that may affect potential attendees' convention participation decision change over time. In today's competitive…

2915

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether factors that may affect potential attendees' convention participation decision change over time. In today's competitive environment, marketers of associations and destinations make considerable efforts to increase the number of attendees for the conventions they host. Optimizing attendance relies on a clear understanding of the dynamic decision‐making process of prospective attendees.

Design/methodology/approach

The study panel was selected from a pool of hospitality and tourism association members, and they were surveyed with an identical questionnaire on two separate occasions. The 107 paired sets were used for data analysis.

Findings

The study showed that there were significant changes in the effects of the following factors on the convention participation decision: networking opportunities, safety and health situation, and travelability.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the research is limited by its time scope and sample size. A three‐month split between the two sampling periods may not be sufficient to assess the temporal changes. The empirical results of the study can serve as a base to reveal how potential attendees' convention participation decision may change over time. Using the measurement scale, industry practitioners can evaluate the impact of their marketing strategies and assist in changing potential attendees' convention participation decision into one for convention attendance.

Originality/value

The study is the first attempt to assess the dynamic aspects of the convention participation decision‐making process.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Srikanth Beldona, Kunwei Lin and Joanne Yoo

As mobile devices amass greater capabilities that include broadband internet and global positioning systems (GPS), the relevance of location based marketing (LBM) services…

1520

Abstract

Purpose

As mobile devices amass greater capabilities that include broadband internet and global positioning systems (GPS), the relevance of location based marketing (LBM) services has gained increased attention among tourism researchers and marketers alike. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of personal travel innovativeness, information privacy and the type of delivery method (pull vs push) on the perception of potential value in LBM programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from travelers at two large airports in the USA. A 2*2 design that comprised LBM (services vs promotions) and the delivery method (pull vs push) combined with two primary covariates, namely personal travel innovativeness and information privacy, evaluated the potential value of LBM programs amongst consumers.

Findings

The findings indicate that personal travel innovativeness has a significant impact on the perception of potential value in LBM. Additionally, the pull delivery method was more amenable to customers when compared with the push delivery method.

Research limitations/implications

There are significant implications for practitioners in the way LBM programs can be conceived and implemented. Also, marketing messages can be produced based on the relevance of the findings.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to directly ascertain the impact of the delivery method and travel innovativeness in an emerging domain of LBM using a synthesis of constructs.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Taegoo (Terry) Kim, Joanne Jung‐Eun Yoo and Gyehee Lee

The purpose of this study is to develop and test an integrative model that explores the structural relationships among perceived justice, service recovery satisfaction…

2974

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and test an integrative model that explores the structural relationships among perceived justice, service recovery satisfaction, post‐recovery customer relationships, and post‐recovery customer partnerships.

Design/methodology/approach

The self‐administered survey was distributed to restaurant customers who had experienced service recovery in the previous six months. Path analysis was performed to estimate the research model and to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The study findings advance the understanding of the beneficial effects of effective service recovery on long‐term relationships and on partnership building with the customers.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines post‐recovery customer relationships and post‐recovery customer partnerships as outcome variables of service recovery satisfaction. Future research should be followed to deepen the understanding of the two consequence variables in different contexts of the hospitality industry.

Practical implications

The proposed model may help restaurant service providers to understand many facets of the service recovery process by identifying the range of recovery strategies.

Originality/value

The proposed model extends the conventional justice‐based model and provides a starting point for investigating the structural relationships among the variables from a holistic perspective. Such information may offer richer insights into the structure, processes, and outcomes of service recovery satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Suna Koh, Joanne Jung‐Eun Yoo and Carl A. Boger

Spas have become increasingly popular with consumers and have emerged as important profit centers for hotels. However, the uniqueness of this market has been largely…

5731

Abstract

Purpose

Spas have become increasingly popular with consumers and have emerged as important profit centers for hotels. However, the uniqueness of this market has been largely overlooked in hospitality literature. The purpose of this paper is to fill the research gap by identifying different market segments among spa goers, based on a set of benefit variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to customers visiting hotel spas in Texas. Factor analysis was performed on 214 completed surveys to identify the dimensions underlying the benefits sought by spa goers. Cluster analysis was then applied to classify spa goers into different groups based on the benefit variables. Finally, importance‐performance analysis (IPA) was performed according to the groups to determine significant patterns.

Findings

Three distinct customer segments are identified based on the benefits sought by spa goers: escapists, neutralists, and hedonists. IPA results showed what each segment perceives as important and how well the hotel spas perform to meet expectations. The results of this paper support the effectiveness of the use of IPA with benefit segmentation.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper should be interpreted cautiously and considered tentatively until they are replicated by a larger spa population. Currently, there are very few benchmark studies on spas to aid in the understanding of this promising market segment. It is hoped that this paper will stimulate much‐needed spa research in hospitality literature.

Originality/value

Future researchers and industry practitioners can gain insight into the motives and benefits sought by spa goers through the use of IPA in conjunction with benefit segmentation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Taegoo (Terry) Kim, Joanne Jung‐Eun Yoo, Gyehee Lee and Joungman Kim

The study aimed to test the antecedents and consequences of emotional labor (EL) acting strategies in the hotel industry. More specifically, the purpose of this study was…

7817

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to test the antecedents and consequences of emotional labor (EL) acting strategies in the hotel industry. More specifically, the purpose of this study was to examine the impacts of emotional intelligence (EI) on the relationships among EL acting strategies, emotional exhaustion (EE) and service recovery performance (SRP).

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was administered in five‐star hotels in Korea. Frontline employees of the hotels participated in the survey and a total of 353 returned questionnaires were used for data analysis.

Findings

The research confirmed the importance of EI in the context of EL. The paper provided empirical evidence that EI affected the EL acting strategies and their consequential behavioral outcomes.

Practical implications

The study suggests that hospitality managers must find ways to elevate employees' EI level. Performance management processes should incorporate identification and positive reinforcement of EL acting strategies that enhance SRP and customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study explored the under‐researched subject of EL and its role within a hospitality industry context. The study is among the first to examine EI as an emotional resource, EL acting strategies, EE and SRP as a form of job‐related performance simultaneously.

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