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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2007

Mari W. Buche and Joanne L. Scillitoe

New technology‐based ventures (NTBVs) gain access to beneficial social capital through their affiliation with technology incubators, organizations created to facilitate…

Abstract

New technology‐based ventures (NTBVs) gain access to beneficial social capital through their affiliation with technology incubators, organizations created to facilitate learning leading to the successful development of nascent firms. Scillitoe and Chakrabarti (2005, 2) identified three sources of beneficial social capital within human networks, “historical ties, organizational facilitation, and trustbased shared pursuit of common goals”, with organizational facilitation identified as the primary source of beneficial social capital for ventures within technology incubators. The current study extends this prior research investigating the development of social capital of NTBVs through incubator facilitation, focusing on the influence of female founders. Results are based on surveys collected from fifty‐four technology‐based firms affiliated with technology incubators in the United States and Finland. The results from this exploratory study show that the speed of technological learning is negatively affected by the interpersonal network access in firms with female founding management team members. Technological learning includes acquiring knowledge of legal protection of intellectual property, complex technological and scientific knowledge, and design and production skills that enable the development and commercialization of NTBV products and services (Deeds, DeCarolis, and Coombs, 1999). This finding contradicts prior research that suggests technological development of ventures is positively influenced by interpersonal network access through incubators (Hansen, Chesbrough, Nohria, and Sull 2000; Scillitoe and Chakrabarti 2005). Implications for technology incubator managers, NTBV founders, and economic development agencies that support technology incubators are discussed.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Joanne L. Scillitoe and Muthuraj Birasnav

The purpose of this study offers a theoretical model, hypotheses and empirical analyses of how formal and informal institutions influence the ease of market entry of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study offers a theoretical model, hypotheses and empirical analyses of how formal and informal institutions influence the ease of market entry of startups in the context of India.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model based upon institutional and market entry theories is presented with hypotheses. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results of the study suggest that college preparations and a culture of creativity and innovation are positively related to ease of market entry by Indian startups. A culture of personal success is negatively related to ease of market entry. Government assistance related to ease of market entry is not significant.

Originality/value

This paper offers a new perspective, linking formal and informal institutional influences to startup ease of market entry. In addition, informal institutions are viewed from the cultures of personal success and creativity/innovation within the entrepreneurial domain, which is also new to the literature. This paper offers specific insights in the context of India startups and offers some interesting findings that can contribution to the literature, policy and practice.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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