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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Joanne B. Ciulla

Abstract

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2019

S. J. Oswald A. J. Mascarenhas

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Corporate Ethics for Turbulent Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-192-2

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Avis Austin

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Avis Austin

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Gayle Porter

Organizational change initiatives are successful only through the efforts of the people, so it is important to look beyond surface reactions and understand the deeper…

Abstract

Organizational change initiatives are successful only through the efforts of the people, so it is important to look beyond surface reactions and understand the deeper implications of employees' visible work habits. By integrating work from several disciplines, this paper poses a series of questions aimed at creating better awareness of differences in how and why people work. Historic tracking of beliefs about work in the USA is provided as an example of how a positive foundation of strong work ethic can become the dysfunctional extreme of workaholism.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Suvaroj Kemavuthanon and Joanne Duberley

This paper is concerned with the role of leadership in community organisations in Thailand. While previous studies of leadership have focused on leadership theories…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is concerned with the role of leadership in community organisations in Thailand. While previous studies of leadership have focused on leadership theories influenced by male‐dominated North American studies, the present paper aims to demonstrate that it is necessary to take the influence of cultural, historical and social structure into account. The purpose is to develop a model of leadership constructed through accounts of the leaders and their subordinates. The model of leadership can potentially enable the leaders, and their subordinates to have a better understanding of the qualities, structure, boundaries and processes of leadership, which can be useful in testing the application of the model in other settings and contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

To support the aim, the study uses two main qualitative methods of data collection, which are in‐depth semi‐structured interviews and a focus group. These two methods offer insight and help to explore unexpected phenomena and the complexity of leadership.

Findings

The results and analysis lead to the conclusion that there are three levels of leadership process beginning with the benefits to oneself, the benefits to others and mutual benefits. The findings suggest that “philanthropy” and “thinking beyond self‐interest” are the crucial qualities of leadership that make other people want to follow a leaders' path.

Practical implications

The process of leadership will help leaders and their subordinates to be more self‐reliant and develop themselves in the long term.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the influence of Buddhism on the role of leadership in community organisations in Thailand.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Sen Sendjaya, Nathan Eva, Mulyadi Robin, Lyfie Sugianto, Ivan ButarButar and Charmine Hartel

Interest in servant leadership has grown exponentially over the past decade as evident in the surge of academic- and practitioner-oriented publications on the subject…

Abstract

Purpose

Interest in servant leadership has grown exponentially over the past decade as evident in the surge of academic- and practitioner-oriented publications on the subject. While prior research has shown that servant leadership leads to citizenship behavior, no study has explored the ethical pathway as the underlying influence process despite the fact that servant leadership is an ethical approach to leadership. On the basis of social learning theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine psychological ethical climate as a key mediator between servant leadership and citizenship behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 123 leader–follower dyads from eight high-performing firms listed on the Indonesian Stock Exchange, and analyzed using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results showed that the relationship between servant leadership and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) (both for OCBI and OCBO) is mediated by psychological ethical climate.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the value of using a servant leadership approach in order to foster a psychological ethical climate and increase OCBs. As such, the authors highlight the importance of a systematic approach to develop servant leaders in organizations.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the understanding of the ethical mechanism that explains the relationship between servant leadership and follower outcomes. Drawing on social learning theory, the findings show that servant leaders are ethical climate architects through their role modeling behaviors and interactions with followers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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