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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Chih Sin, Ayesha Janjua, Annie Hedges, Chloe Cook and Joanna Sloman

The National Health Service Breast Screening Programme set up 20 years ago in the UK has to evolve continuously to meet changing needs as a result of fundamental transformations…

Abstract

The National Health Service Breast Screening Programme set up 20 years ago in the UK has to evolve continuously to meet changing needs as a result of fundamental transformations in the age and ethnic profile of the population. This article draws on evidence generated as part of the Healthcare Commission's national study aimed at identifying issues that may contribute to different groups not having equal access to, experience of, or outcomes from services relating to breast screening and breast cancer treatment. Findings indicate that ethnicity has an effect on the awareness of services and of breast cancer. Access to screening and the experience of screening and treatment are influenced by the interaction of ethnicity with age. Younger women from certain black and minority ethnic groups face particular barriers. There can be additional barriers experienced by those from linguistic minorities. Equality of access, experience and outcomes does not mean treating everyone the same way.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Joanna Poon

This paper aims to report the detailed findings of a Centre for Education in the Built Environment (CEBE) funded study into good practice in the use of blended learning in…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the detailed findings of a Centre for Education in the Built Environment (CEBE) funded study into good practice in the use of blended learning in property education. “Blended learning” is a combination of face‐to‐face learning experiences and online learning experiences which aim to complement each other in order to support and enhance student learning. The aim of this paper is to examine the benefits that blended learning provides to students' learning experience and engagement in property education. It also seeks to discuss lessons learnt from academics who deliver Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) accredited property‐related courses, in developing blended learning and students' interaction with the blended learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the research findings from interviews and questionnaire surveys of RICS and CIOB accredited property‐related course providers and the students who currently study these courses. Eight course directors of property‐related courses were interviewed and through discussion with the academic interviewees a questionnaire was developed and sent to all RICS and CIOB undergraduate and postgraduate course directors in the UK. The eight interviewed course directors were requested to send out a questionnaire to their students, and 442 completed students' questionnaires were returned. Further telephone interviews with seven students were conducted. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded to identify similar themes. The frequency of the answer in the questionnaire and comments from interviewees is presented.

Findings

Both academics and students find that blended learning gives greater flexibility for student learning in terms of learning style and study pace. With the adoption of a wide range of delivery methods, blended learning can successfully improve students' experience and enhance their engagement. It is also important to ensure that blended learning is really “blended” and includes a good mix of delivery methods. “Face‐to‐face interaction” with students is important as students require reassurance and on‐going support from lecturers. Providing training for students to use specialist software in order to equip them to fully utilise blended learning is also essential. Finally, allocation of sufficient time and resources for the development and maintenance of blended learning programmes is also key to its success.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to investigate the lessons learnt from academics in developing blended learning and also students' interaction with the blended learning environment in property‐related courses in the UK. Property‐related course providers can use the results of this study to inform the design of blended learning in their programme in order to enhance students' learning experience and engagement.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Martyn Sloman

The purpose of this paper is to review apprenticeship policy in the UK and to present examples of good practice.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review apprenticeship policy in the UK and to present examples of good practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a review of three cases.

Findings

Apprenticeships are not an easy option. An apprenticeship scheme, and indeed any training initiative, will not command support within an organisation unless it can be seen to assist the business in economic terms. Context is critical.

Practical implications

The paper argues for a more realistic assessment of the role of apprenticeship at the level of government policy and in the organisation.

Originality/value

The paper offers a different and more measured perspective on apprenticeships, which contrast with current uncritical hype and over-selling.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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