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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Joanna Kidd and Jill Manthorpe

The inclusion of modern slavery in the Care Act 2014 as a form of abuse means that the subject of modern slavery is now included in the remit of adult safeguarding in…

Abstract

Purpose

The inclusion of modern slavery in the Care Act 2014 as a form of abuse means that the subject of modern slavery is now included in the remit of adult safeguarding in England. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to the Modern Slavery Act 2015 and its provisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A policy analysis was undertaken in 2016 drawing on research and commentary related to the interface between modern slavery and adult safeguarding.

Findings

There is little material as yet focussing on adult safeguarding and modern slavery but the inclusion of modern slavery in this area of practice and organisations will require practitioner responses, organisational collaboration and revisions of data collection and analysis. Newspaper accounts of criminal charges under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 may be important first evidence of the interface potentially between modern slavery and adults at risk of abuse and neglect that are the focus of adult safeguarding concern.

Practical implications

Information about modern slavery may provide relevant background and contextual detail for adult safeguarding communities, furnishing links and resources for this new area of their work.

Originality/value

This paper is likely to be of interest to policymakers, researchers and practitioners in examining their new duties under the Care Act 2014 and the Modern Slavery Act 2015, and to wider public and private bodies considering their responsibilities in responses to modern slavery more broadly.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Janice M. Bogstad

For many years, science fiction has been perceived as “rayguns and rocket ships” boys' literature. Any number of impressionistic and statistical studies have identified…

Abstract

For many years, science fiction has been perceived as “rayguns and rocket ships” boys' literature. Any number of impressionistic and statistical studies have identified the typical SF reader as male, between the ages of twelve and twenty and, in the case of adults, employed in some technical field. Yet I continually find myself having conversations with women, only to find that they, like myself, began reading science fiction between the ages of six and ten, have been reading it voraciously ever since, and were often frustrated at the absence of satisfying female characters and the presence of misogynistic elements in what they read. The stereotype of the male reader and the generally male SF environment mask both the increasing presence of women writers in the field of science fiction and the existence of a feminist dialog within some SF novels. This dialog had its beginnings in the mid‐sixties and is still going strong. It is the hope of the feminist SF community that this effacement can be counteracted.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Peter Raisbeck

Abstract

Details

Architecture as a Global System: Scavengers, Tribes, Warlords and Megafirms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-655-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Judith Donoghue, Jenny Graham, Julie Gibbs, Suzanne Mitten‐Lewis and Nicole Blay

Falls are a significant burden on the Australian health care budget and can result in loss of personal independence, injury or death. A sustained high rate of inpatient…

Abstract

Falls are a significant burden on the Australian health care budget and can result in loss of personal independence, injury or death. A sustained high rate of inpatient falls in a 550‐bed acute care hospital has made it imperative for nurses to identify patients at highest risk, in order to implement preventive interventions. This study examined the prevalence of “intrinsic high risk” characteristics identified by the literature in people who fell during hospitalisation, to confirm the validity of these predictors in detecting risk. Over ten weeks 91 inpatients fell (total 118 falls) and were assessed for intrinsic risk factors. Most prevalent was impaired ambulatory status resulting in balance instability. Other high prevalence factors included cognitive impairment and age > 75. Commonly cited factors, such as urinary or faecal incontinence, medications and history of prior falls, were found less frequently. No significant differences in risk factors by gender were identified.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Aideen Maria Foley

Climate data, including historical climate observations and climate model outputs, are often used in climate impact assessments, to explore potential climate futures…

Abstract

Purpose

Climate data, including historical climate observations and climate model outputs, are often used in climate impact assessments, to explore potential climate futures. However, characteristics often associated with “islandness”, such as smallness, land boundedness and isolation, may mean that climate impact assessment methods applied at broader scales cannot simply be downscaled to island settings. This paper aims to discuss information needs and the limitations of climate models and datasets in the context of small islands and explores how such challenges might be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing existing literature, this paper explores challenges of islandness in top-down, model-led climate impact assessment and bottom-up, vulnerability-led approaches. It examines how alternative forms of knowledge production can play a role in validating models and in guiding adaptation actions at the local level and highlights decision-making techniques that can support adaptation even when data is uncertain.

Findings

Small island topography is often too detailed for global or even regional climate models to resolve, but equally, local meteorological station data may be absent or uncertain, particularly in island peripheries. However, rather than viewing the issue as decision-making with big data at the regional/global scale versus with little or no data at the small island scale, a more productive discourse can emerge by conceptualising strategies of decision-making with unconventional types of data.

Originality/value

This paper provides a critical overview and synthesis of issues relating to climate models, data sets and impact assessment methods as they pertain to islands, which can benefit decision makers and other end-users of climate data in island communities.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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