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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Joanna Fox, Anne-Marie Smith, Lizzie Kenedler and George Evangelinos

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the development of a recovery-oriented training programme for mental health care-givers. It also considers the effectiveness of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the development of a recovery-oriented training programme for mental health care-givers. It also considers the effectiveness of using participatory research methods that promote involvement of people with diverse expertise to co-produce this programme. It presents a rationale for developing recovery-oriented training, which employs blended learning, comprising face-to-face and e-learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A small advisory group consisting of professionals, experts-by-experience (service users) and -by-caring (care-givers) and an academic developed a blended learning programme about the recovery approach for mental health carer-givers. This paper details the participatory approach supported by an action research cycle that contributed to the design of the programme, and the specific impact of experiential knowledge on its development.

Findings

Reflections on the advisory group process are described that led to the co-production of the course. This leads to consideration of the value of using this research approach to develop a carer-focused programme. The content of the recovery-oriented training programme is presented which adopts blended learning. This leads to discussion of potential of this format to improve carers’ access to training.

Originality/value

It is proposed that this recovery-oriented course, building on a previous study, has the potential to positively influence outcomes for the training programme participants (the care-givers) and the person they support. It is suggested that blended learning may in part overcome some of the barriers carers experience to accessing and participating in traditional interventions. Reflections on the process of co-production underline the value of participatory research in designing this recovery-oriented course for carers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Joanna Fox

User involvement in research is entering the mainstream of traditional mental health research. In practice, there are diverse ways in which the process of involvement is…

Abstract

Purpose

User involvement in research is entering the mainstream of traditional mental health research. In practice, there are diverse ways in which the process of involvement is experienced by mental health service user researchers. This paper aims to explore two diverse experiences of involvement by the researcher.

Design/methodology/approach

Auto-ethnography is the research methodology used in this study; it combines a process of reflective writing and critical analysis which enables the author to explore experiences of being both a service user and academic researcher. Two accounts of the author’s involvement in mental health research are presented: one which builds on a consultation model and the other based on co-production principles.

Findings

Experiences of power-sharing and collaborative decision-making, alongside disempowerment, are discussed, leading to exploration of the theoretical and practical processes for promoting participation of users in research.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited because it is undertaken by one individual in a local setting, and is therefore is not generalisable; however, it provides useful insights into the diverse processes of involvement that many service users experience.

Practical implications

Recommendations are presented to support the involvement of service users in research, with final remarks offered considering the possible future implementation of this still emerging tradition.

Originality/value

This paper reflects on the experiences of one service user academic involved in research and highlights diverse experiences of both empowering and disempowering involvement, providing recommendations for best practice.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Joanna Fox and Roz Gasper

This study aims to review how the mental ill-health of academic staff is regarded in higher education institutions (HEIs) and explore the decision to disclose (or not) a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to review how the mental ill-health of academic staff is regarded in higher education institutions (HEIs) and explore the decision to disclose (or not) a mental health condition whilst working in this sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The choice to disclose is explored by using duoethnography undertaken by two female academics working in this context who both experience mental ill-health. Both authors recorded their experiences, which were then shared with each other and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The themes that emerged from the authors’ reflections comprise: a discussion of the connection between work-life identities and the impact of mental ill-health in the workplace; a consideration of the elements that influence our decision to disclose (or not) mental health diagnoses within HEI; and an examination of the additional burden of identity work for those who experience mental ill-health.

Originality/value

The study contributes to this evidence base by exploring the choice to disclose a mental health diagnosis in HEIs. It investigates this highly personal decision and suggests that this choice depends on the context in which we are located and how we experience our different identities in the workplace. Furthermore, it highlights the importance for HEIs to develop positive employment practices to support academic staff with mental ill-health to disclose a mental health condition and to achieve a good workplace environment whilst emphasising the need for more empirical work to explore the decision to disclose (or not) in this sector.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Joanna Fox

Drawing partly on her own experience, Joanna Fox seeks to unpack the expertise that service users bring to the design and delivery of mental health services. Service user…

Abstract

Drawing partly on her own experience, Joanna Fox seeks to unpack the expertise that service users bring to the design and delivery of mental health services. Service user involvement cannot be imposed by policy diktat from above, she argues. Rather, it must be nurtured at the grass roots, by allowing service users to take control over their own lives, and their care and treatment.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Joanna Fox

Drawing partly on personal experience, the author of this article seeks to unpack the expertise that service users bring to the design and delivery of mental health…

Abstract

Drawing partly on personal experience, the author of this article seeks to unpack the expertise that service users bring to the design and delivery of mental health services. Service user involvement cannot be imposed by policy diktat from above, she argues. Rather, it must be nurtured at the grass roots, by allowing service users to take control over their own lives, and their care and treatment.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Joanna Fox

I describe the development of a group in North London that aimed to increase the involvement of carers in the development and monitoring of mental health services across…

Abstract

I describe the development of a group in North London that aimed to increase the involvement of carers in the development and monitoring of mental health services across the borough. I enabled the carers to evaluate their experiences of the group using a participatory action research model. The evaluation was divided into two phases. Phase 1 focused on how the carers developed effective processes to facilitate the individuals in the group to represent not only their experiences but those of the collective. I describe how a critical incident facilitated this discussion and how the carers used the action research cycle to enable this change. Phase 2 enabled the group to reflect on their experiences of the group's impact upon them. The carers identified the following main themes of their experience of the group: shared experience of mental health stigma; empowerment and increased confidence; increased knowledge to enable them to care for themselves and their loved one more effectively, although this was tinged with a sense of frustration. In this process, I reflect on the vision that I had for Carers Against Stigma (CAS) as a user researcher and practitioner working with carers. I discuss the potential conflict that I faced as a practitioner and researcher initiating a carer‐led group. The theoretical implications of the individual service representative representing the views of the collective are discussed, and their needs for access and support to be involved in research and service evaluation are identified.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Adam Pozner

Abstract

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Ian Shaw

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

This index covers all issues between February 2005 (Volume 9, Issue 1) and November 2008 (Volume 12, Issue 4). Numbers in bold refer to yolume, numbers in brackets refer…

Abstract

This index covers all issues between February 2005 (Volume 9, Issue 1) and November 2008 (Volume 12, Issue 4). Numbers in bold refer to yolume, numbers in brackets refer to issue, with subsequent numbers to pages.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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