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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Joan F. Marques

To encourage those who feel victimized by the tendency of “othering” or being part of an “outgroup” in any organization, in perceiving this reality from a more constructive angle.

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Abstract

Purpose

To encourage those who feel victimized by the tendency of “othering” or being part of an “outgroup” in any organization, in perceiving this reality from a more constructive angle.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective viewpoint, supported by observations, conversations, and readings.

Findings

Othering exists, but it is a perspective that we can choose as a source of oppression or growth.

Practical implications

Considering the five ideas in this article can assist readers in becoming more resilient and positive members of their work- and other environments.

Social implications

As more people decide to rethink othering, the ridiculousness of the entire tendency may get deposed, and othering may become an obsolete behavioral pattern.

Originality/value

Presenting five ideas pertaining to performance excellence, making a constructive difference, keeping a mindset of elevating rather than defeating perspectives, maintaining dignity, and moving to new horizons. Through these five ideas, the author proposes a constructive perspective to a trend that is usually considered discriminatory and subjugating.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Joan F. Marques

The aim of this paper is reaffirming the real purpose of studying, working, and acquiring a decent lifestyle, which is happiness.

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906

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is reaffirming the real purpose of studying, working, and acquiring a decent lifestyle, which is happiness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes reflections on workshops with professionals, coaching insights, and literature review.

Findings

Attaining happiness is not necessarily dependent on our employer but on our perception of our work. If our mind is at ease, and our outlook is positive, our work can be joy, and we can tread our personal path of happiness.

Practical implications

May serve as a source of self-reflection to readers and potential reconsideration of the reasons behind their professional performance: while earning money is important to pay the bills and care for our families, we owe it to ourselves to be happy while doing it. Finding contentment in our work is the critical step to enjoying it and, thus, being happy doing it.

Social implications

Individuals who focus on acquiring and maintaining their own happiness will be more likely to also exude positive energy to others, thus elevating the chances of these others to pursue happiness as well.

Originality/value

This is a call for refocusing on the true purpose of all our actions. While it is actually rather simple, we seem to keep losing focus and digress into converting means into ends, while disregarding the real end of all our actions, which is happiness.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2019

Joan F. Marques

The purpose of this paper is to challenge current and future organizational managers toward engaging in a process of reflecting on the purpose of their performance and the…

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263

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge current and future organizational managers toward engaging in a process of reflecting on the purpose of their performance and the purpose of the organization they serve and also to challenge management educators and coaches to reflect on the emphasis of their training of those who will step into management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the current criticism on organizational management education and practice, and brings global inequality in the scope to underscore the importance of correcting a flawed system based on a flawed perspective.

Findings

It is critical to change the narrative the authors use for management in organizations from, “organizations exist to maximize the value of their shareholders, and the managers in those organizations need to ensure that this happens” to, “organizations exist to support the communities in which they operate, and managers in those organizations need to ensure that this happens.”

Practical implications

Organizational managers will focus on a more socially acceptable set of priorities when adopting the narrative promoted in this paper. Business educators will focus on more transdisciplinary approaches to help their students think beyond self-centered and sheer profit-based boundaries, and plant seeds toward constructive and morally sound social change early on.

Social implications

Communities will fare much better when the organizations in their areas will focus more on well-being of those who reside in the community rather than a handful of often absent shareholders.

Originality/value

This paper questions the core of organizational existence and managerial performance therein. It reaches beyond technological, operational, and tactical levels of performance and questions the grand strategy of organizational existence and performance.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Joan Marques

The purpose of this paper is to underscore the changing perceptions of leadership as a whole, and more specifically, what is appreciated in contemporary leadership practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to underscore the changing perceptions of leadership as a whole, and more specifically, what is appreciated in contemporary leadership practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a reflective paper based on observations on leadership skills and how these are perceived and valued today.

Findings

Leadership today demands qualities that are not merely to be reflected on others or situations, but that have to, first and foremost, make sense to the leader internally. Qualities and skills discussed are authenticity, wakefulness, agility, kindness, equilibrium, neuroticism, and eagerness.

Practical implications

This paper aims to provide food for thought to those who consider themselves leaders or aspire to become leaders, whether in formal or informal settings.

Social implications

The paper strives to instill deeper awareness in those who perform in leadership positions, toward treating themselves and others toward greater fulfillment and accomplishment.

Originality/value

The leadership qualities discussed in this paper demonstrate that leadership is not necessarily a practice in which followers and a situation have to be included. Each quality requires deep reflection and, first and foremost, pertains to self-leadership as a precursor to leadership onto others.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2018

Joan Marques

Through an overview of the perceptional evolution of progress over the past two centuries, this paper aims to review a changed, yet constructive paradigm that has emerged…

Abstract

Purpose

Through an overview of the perceptional evolution of progress over the past two centuries, this paper aims to review a changed, yet constructive paradigm that has emerged in business leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a general review-based deliberation presenting standards of the twentieth century, the need for a shift in paradigms and the shift as it unfolds in the twenty-first century.

Findings

Focusing on optimal stakeholder inclusion, yet not disregarding the concept of progress in a competitive environment, this paper presents a set of interrelated leadership skills and characteristics, including a discussion about their applicability and ways to develop them.

Research limitations/implications

While globally applicable, the views in this paper are primarily based on the American performance environment.

Practical implications

Management practices would not have evolved to today’s level if we did not have the past experiences to learn from. The deliberations and insights shared in this article should be seen as a way of evaluating the path that led us to our current, multi-tiered leadership paradigm.

Social implications

The model presented in this article should be seen as a useful, yet incomplete set of skills and characteristics to be considered by today’s and future leaders to ensure greater stakeholder inclusion.

Originality/value

Within the framework of focusing on the management horizon, this paper places the driving motives of two centuries that influenced our current society alongside each other and contemplates on the necessary shifts needed to move forward.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Joan Marques

This paper aims to contribute or rekindle internal and external dialogues about the interactions, decisions and behaviour in the work environments; while also consider…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute or rekindle internal and external dialogues about the interactions, decisions and behaviour in the work environments; while also consider some critical overarching values that can help workforce members cope with the stress and pressure, which augment as the speed of life increases.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this project is an integrative literature review, supported by, findings and reflections from two doctoral dissertations: one in workplace spirituality and one in Buddhist psychology; and the researcher’s analysis and joint application of these two streams over the past decade.

Findings

Workplace spirituality and Buddhist psychology share overlapping, multi-interpretable traits, with as the main discrepancies that workplace spirituality is a relatively new concept, while Buddhist psychology has been around for more than 2,500 years; and workplace spirituality focusses only on the workplace, while Buddhist psychology focusses on every area of the life. Yet, the overarching notion of doing right while respecting and accepting others and aiming for an overarching better quality of life remains a strong driver in both realms.

Research limitations/implications

This paper will hopefully entice future researchers to engage in additional studies on spiritual intersections to expand on such databases and enhance awareness, acceptance and implementation amongst scholars and practitioners in business settings.

Practical implications

Exploring intersections of behavioural disciplines such as workplace spirituality and Buddhist psychology addresses an important need within workforce members and therewith also those within their social circles, as they evoke deeper and consistent contemplation on the aspects that connect us together and can enhance overall well-being and happiness at a greater magnitude than, this study experiences it today.

Social implications

The study aims to deliver a contribution to the database of awareness-enhancing literature, in an effort to help spawn dialogue and critical thinking about the attitudes and behaviours towards ourselves, others and the future.

Originality/value

This paper presents an overview of themes in two psychological streams, both focussing on living and acting with greater consciousness, to make more mindful decisions, improve the overall experience of cooperating towards a common good and understand the responsibility towards creating a future that will be sustainable rather than destroyed.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Joan Marques

The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative way of perceiving the constant state of flux in today’s workplaces, and help encourage managers as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative way of perceiving the constant state of flux in today’s workplaces, and help encourage managers as well as non-managerial employees, who find themselves in transitional situations, to perceive these as a natural progression of life.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a reflective paper based on observations and experiences with Buddhist psychological techniques leading to enhanced personal awareness and how these can enhance the quality of life at work.

Findings

Workforce shifts could be perceived as abhorrent, and require mourning and psychological guidance, but they can also be seen as elements of the natural process of arising and passing, thus the impermanence, of everything. When considered that way, letting go gets elevated from a challenge into a well-mastered art.

Practical implications

This paper aims to provide food for thought to those who are members of the workforce, and regularly struggle with the shifts in personnel compilations based on changing needs.

Social implications

The paper strives to instill deeper awareness within those who are part of the work environment, to achieve greater wakefulness, resulting in better understanding, acceptance, and inner-calm.

Originality/value

The invitation for a paradigm shift in this paper is not a traditional one in Western thinking, but may be a very helpful one, as we continue to experience accelerated paces of change in work circumstances.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Joan Marques

This paper aims to advance the view that employees should be allowed to evaluate their supervisors, with a review of these evaluations by the next level of management.

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1103

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance the view that employees should be allowed to evaluate their supervisors, with a review of these evaluations by the next level of management.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws on reflections from a workshop in which members of the workforce shared their concerns about the arbitrariness of supervisors in judging their performance, and these employees' lack of power and influence to critique the supervisor's performance in return.

Findings

Shows that, even in workplaces that claim to have initiated mechanisms for employees to evaluate their supervisors, these often fall short, either because employees have to place their names on their evaluations or because supervisors hand pick the employees who take part.

Practical implications

Contends that reciprocal reviews would improve the performance of supervisors.

Originality/value

Details a useful role for HR in the reciprocal‐review process.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Joan Marques

The purpose of this paper is to present challenges in leadership performance today, as well as leadership styles that have potential, given the contemporary shifts in…

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7042

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present challenges in leadership performance today, as well as leadership styles that have potential, given the contemporary shifts in performance climate.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on empirical research, obtained through methodological triangulation, partly through critical literature review, and partly through the author’s ongoing leadership studies during the past ten years, to be subdivided in three phenomenological studies, and 72 structured leadership interviews.

Findings

There is a multitude of factors that keep changing the leadership landscape, and there is a series of leadership skills that suffice well given the parameters of today’s work environments. Nine of these leadership styles are presented, including their main characteristics and contemporary usefulness.

Research limitations/implications

The studies reviewed, although in-depth, applied to a limited set of options. Because leadership is such a broad and dynamic topic, neither literature review nor qualitative studies and interview series provide an entirely comprehensive overview, especially when conducted in one part of the world.

Practical implications

Leaders may reconsider the skills required for themselves and their workforce to guarantee successful performance in an increasingly interconnected world. Leaders may engage in reflection and work toward stronger emphasis and development of skills in which they consider themselves weak. Leaders may examine their work environment and consider how to apply the factors that could facilitate one or more of the presented leadership styles in their organization.

Originality/value

The leadership styles presented are multi-applicable and are mainly based on inter-human respect, so leaders may reflect and consider the style they feel most attracted to.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Joan Marques

This article aims to present the findings from data gathered from 1,160 individuals who participated over the course of five years in a series of workshops, university…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present the findings from data gathered from 1,160 individuals who participated over the course of five years in a series of workshops, university courses and business dialogue sessions on the subject of personal and professional excellence.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from dialogue sessions and workshops with LA‐based workforce members, and classroom sessions in higher business education. The shift from general management teaching to focused self‐management dialogues was explained, emerged themes from five years of data gathering were examined and the themes and keywords were visualized and results noted.

Findings

The paper finds that in today's rapidly changing world of work, people are seeking ways to reinvent themselves in order to become more resilient. The findings listed in this paper are not exhaustive but should rather be used as a pragmatic tool for further research on the topic.

Research limitations/implications

The population used for data was large, yet geographically limited, as it consisted of members of the Los Angeles workforce and business and management students in Los Angeles. The themes to be formed could have been named differently, as the clustering process was done by the author and not the audience. It is suggested that future research should concentrate on applying this study among other geographical and cultural audiences for a greater foundation in findings and for capturing additional, possibly deviating, perspectives.

Practical implications

Four main themes are presented as a result of the analysis of the collected data: right action, right thinking, right mindfulness, and right connection, along with 20 keywords. Personal and professional excellence is not a one‐time achievement, but a continuous effort in which multiple aspects need to be addressed at the same time. It could be seen as an ongoing paradigm renewal.

Originality/value

The paper tailors a model for personal and professional excellence in the twenty‐first century AD to a model that was developed in the twenty‐fifth century BC.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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