Search results

1 – 10 of 34
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Morgan E. Currie, Britt S. Paris and Joan M. Donovan

The purpose of this paper is to expand on emergent data activism literature to draw distinctions between different types of data management practices undertaken by groups…

Downloads
1071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand on emergent data activism literature to draw distinctions between different types of data management practices undertaken by groups of data activists.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors offer three case studies that illuminate the data management strategies of these groups. Each group discussed in the case studies is devoted to representing a contentious political issue through data, but their data management practices differ in meaningful ways. The project Making Sense produces their own data on pollution in Kosovo. Fatal Encounters collects “missing data” on police homicides in the USA. The Environmental Data Governance Initiative hopes to keep vulnerable US data on climate change and environmental injustices in the public domain.

Findings

In analysing the three case studies, the authors surface how temporal dimensions, geographic scale and sociotechnical politics influence their differing data management strategies.

Originality/value

The authors build upon extant literature on data management infrastructure, which primarily discusses how these practices manifest in scientific and institutional research settings, to analyse how data management infrastructure is often crucial to social movements that rely on data to surface political issues.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Knight's Industrial Law Reports goes into a new style and format as Managerial Law This issue of KILR is restyled Managerial Law and it now appears on a continuous…

Abstract

Knight's Industrial Law Reports goes into a new style and format as Managerial Law This issue of KILR is restyled Managerial Law and it now appears on a continuous updating basis rather than as a monthly routine affair.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Alastair Orr, Jason Donovan and Dietmar Stoian

Smallholder value chains are dynamic, changing over time in sudden, unpredictable ways as they adapt to shocks. Understanding these dynamics and adaptation is essential…

Downloads
4576

Abstract

Purpose

Smallholder value chains are dynamic, changing over time in sudden, unpredictable ways as they adapt to shocks. Understanding these dynamics and adaptation is essential for these chains to remain competitive in turbulent markets. Many guides to value chain development, though they focus welcome attention on snapshots of current structure and performance, pay limited attention to the dynamic forces affecting these chains or to adaptation. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops an expanded conceptual framework to understand value chain performance based on the theory of complex adaptive systems. The framework combines seven common properties of complex systems: time, uncertainty, sensitivity to initial conditions, endogenous shocks, sudden change, interacting agents and adaptation.

Findings

The authors outline how the framework can be used to ask new research questions and analyze case studies in order to improve our understanding of the development of smallholder value chains and their capacity for adaptation.

Research limitations/implications

The framework highlights the need for greater attention to value chain dynamics.

Originality/value

The framework offers a new perspective on the dynamics of smallholder value chains.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Marta Vernet

With a storytelling tone, this chapter narrates different examples of service-learning programs at The American School of Barcelona. The opportunities for international…

Abstract

With a storytelling tone, this chapter narrates different examples of service-learning programs at The American School of Barcelona. The opportunities for international schools to develop experiential/learning programs through partnerships with a variety of institutions from the local community such as hospitals, multinational corporations, local and international NGOs, business schools, and regional or national governments are described. Establishing these partnerships not only provides students with valuable opportunities for experiential learning and service-learning, but it also has a very positive impact on partner institutions and their constituents, enhancing the school’s image in the community. Processes, as well as problems and solutions, that arise when developing service-learning programs are examined. By reading this chapter, it is hoped that readers will be inspired and, if they are practitioners of service-learning, will be able to replicate some of these programs in their own contexts. The reader will be able to see the positive benefits both for those who are serving and those who are served.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Paul Nieuwenhuysen

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used…

Abstract

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used in online information and documentation work. They fall into the following categories:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Line Nielsen, Carsten Hinrichsen, Katrine Rich Madsen, Malene Kubstrup Nelausen, Charlotte Meilstrup, Ai Koyanagi, Vibeke Koushede and Ziggi Ivan Santini

Workplace and study environments generally provide opportunities for social connectedness, however, not all individuals in such settings are equally well connected. It is…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace and study environments generally provide opportunities for social connectedness, however, not all individuals in such settings are equally well connected. It is possible that potential mental health benefits of participation in social leisure activities may be greater for individuals that lack social connectedness through a workplace or study environment. This study aims to examine if the association between social leisure activities and mental health is moderated by the degree of social connectedness at work/school.

Design/methodology/approach

Data stem from 2,406 adults (age range 16-64 years old) from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016. Validated scales were used to measure mental well-being and depression/anxiety symptoms. Multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted.

Findings

Participation in social leisure activities (i.e. participation in community/social groups such as a sports association, art club, book club, running group, card game club, cultural or political group) was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with depression/anxiety symptoms. The associations were stronger among individuals feeling less socially connected at work/school and strongest among individuals that were unemployed or not enrolled in education.

Originality/value

Mental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting social leisure activities especially among unemployed or otherwise socially isolated groups, as well as among individuals that are not well connected at their workplace or school. Workplaces and schools may also monitor employee/student social connectedness and potentially intervene accordingly.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Associate and Vick

Visual representations of teachers and teachers’ work over the past century and a half, in both professional literature and popular media, commonly construct teachers…

Abstract

Visual representations of teachers and teachers’ work over the past century and a half, in both professional literature and popular media, commonly construct teachers’ work as teacher‐centred, and built around specific technologies that privilege the teacher as the active, dominant and legitimate principal agent in the educational process. This article analyses a set of photographs that represent an ‘alternative’ educational approach to normalised mainstream schooling, to explore the ways such practices might enact pedagogy within different social relations. Butler’s discussions of performativity and Foucault’s concept of technologies of self, offer a theoretical framework for understanding the educative and political work such visual representations of teachers work might perform, in the construction of capacities to imagine what teachers’ work looks like, with implications for capacities to enact teaching. The photographs analysed present a pedagogy in which the teacher is less visibly central and less overtly directive in relation to children’s learning than in normalised pedagogy. Thus, in important respects, they offer material from which to construct a different vision of what teachers’ work looks like, and, consequently, to enact teachers’ work differently. In this article I explore a set of photographs of Montessori methods at Blackfriars School in Sydney in the early twentieth century. I do so in order to establish whether such photographs offer a representation of teaching that differs significantly from conventional ‘normalised’ understandings of teachers’ work. This in turn is intended to inform one part of a transformative agenda to address problematic aspects of contemporary schooling.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Ziggi Ivan Santini, Vibeke Koushede, Carsten Hinrichsen, Malene Kubstrup Nelausen, Katrine Rich Madsen, Charlotte Meilstrup, Ai Koyanagi and Line Nielsen

Previous studies have shown a positive association between being engaged or challenged through a leisure activity and good mental health; however, this relationship may…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have shown a positive association between being engaged or challenged through a leisure activity and good mental health; however, this relationship may vary by the extent to which individuals feel challenged at work or school. This study aims to examine whether a challenging work/study (or the lack of it) moderates the relationship between engaging in challenging leisure activity and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 2,406 adults 16–64 years old from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016 were linked to Danish national register-based data. Mental well-being (outcome) was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and depression/anxiety symptoms (outcome) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. Multivariable linear regressions were performed to estimate the association between challenging leisure activity (predictor) and challenging work/study (potential moderator).

Findings

Overall, engaging in a challenging leisure activity was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with anxiety symptoms. For these two, a challenging work/study significantly moderated the relationships. The positive association between a challenging activity and mental well-being was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Similarly, the negative association between a challenging activity and anxiety symptoms was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Among individuals with a very challenging work/study, challenging leisure activity was not associated with anxiety symptoms. Finally, engaging in a challenging leisure activity did not significantly predict depression symptoms.

Originality/value

Mental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting challenging leisure activities especially among groups not employed or enrolled in education or among individuals that do not feel challenged through their work or studies. The results may further have implications for efforts to address and protect employee/student mental health at workplaces or schools.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Joan Ball and Donald C. Barnes

The purpose of this paper is to combine the evolving fields of customer delight and positive psychology to investigate a broader conceptualization of customer delight…

Downloads
1305

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine the evolving fields of customer delight and positive psychology to investigate a broader conceptualization of customer delight. Furthermore, to investigate antecedent variables that impact this broader conceptualization.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed structural equation modeling in a hedonic context.

Findings

Key findings indicate that aside from joy and surprise, gratitude also has a positive impact on customer delight. Furthermore, psychological sense of brand community (PSBC) and transcendent customer experiences (TCE) were shown to positively impact the proximal antecedents of customer delight.

Research limitations/implications

Extending the domain of customer delight beyond joy and surprise contributes to the theoretical discussion on what customer delight represents to the service firm. Further, this research identifies new theoretical relationships between PSBC/TCE and customer delight.

Practical implications

By offering the broader conceptualization of customer delight, this research contributes to the discussion of whether delight is possible or even profitable. Namely, by moving past joy/surprise, this research suggests that managing gratitude can be a strategic lever that the modern service firm can utilize.

Originality/value

This is the first research to evaluate gratitude as an antecedent to customer delight. Further, by combining positive psychology and delight research this research identifies new predictors of positive customer experiences.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

1 – 10 of 34