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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Joan Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meanings of walkability and relevance for tourism in modern Asian cities, including barriers to its implementation. Particular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meanings of walkability and relevance for tourism in modern Asian cities, including barriers to its implementation. Particular reference is made to conditions in the city state of Singapore and the manner in which urban planning and transport policies are influencing the tourist walking experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was selected as most suitable for the exercise accompanied by a literature review. Findings are derived from material in the public arena collected from a range of sources.

Findings

The government is shown to be actively pursuing policies to encourage both walking and cycling by residents as components of wider strategies directed at improving liveability. Several initiatives which positively affect the comfort and enjoyment of city walking by tourists are identified, but so too are Singapore’s shortcomings as a destination in which to walk. Balancing the demands on public space is a critical challenge for authorities.

Originality/value

The subject has been neglected within both an urban tourism and Asian city context and this paper illuminates aspects of significance pertaining to the concept and practice of walkability. Insights are afforded into factors which facilitate walkability and impediments to overcome.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Joan Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between global cities and international tourism with particular reference to the recent experiences of Tokyo which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between global cities and international tourism with particular reference to the recent experiences of Tokyo which has recently seen a marked increase in arrivals. It addresses questions of the standing of Tokyo as a global city and tourist destination, how the two functions are connected and why changes are occurring.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed is that of an empirical case study based on the analysis of published materials drawn from a diversity of sources.

Findings

The defining characteristics of global cities are generally conducive to their function as international tourist destinations. They possess a wealth of tourism resources and amenities which facilitate inbound tourist flows. Tokyo is a prominent example of a global city, but has tended to attract fewer visitors than others in that category. The recent significant growth in arrivals is attributed to changes in the tourism industry and wider environment, yet some challenges remain before it can catch up with its counterparts.

Originality/value

Fresh insights are afforded into the implications of global city status for tourism and the development of Tokyo as a destination which tends to have been neglected in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Joan C. Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to examine aspects of the contemporary relevance of the Michelin Guide as efforts are made to extend its reach in Asia. The focus is on recent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine aspects of the contemporary relevance of the Michelin Guide as efforts are made to extend its reach in Asia. The focus is on recent endeavours by the producers of the restaurant guide to represent local conditions by acknowledging the importance of street food and hawkers.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is that of a case study based on analysis of published material about the inaugural Singapore Michelin Guide and its consequences.

Findings

The Michelin Guide confronts challenges in retaining its authority and establishing itself in new Asian locations. The Singapore edition indicates attempts at responsiveness to distinctive circumstances through the recognition of street food and hawkers, but questions can be raised about the appropriateness of their inclusion and rating.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the absence of primary data, important topics about food and dining landscapes and modes of restaurant reviewing and grading are explored. A research agenda for the future is also proposed.

Practical implications

Attention is given to the impacts of the guide for individual enterprises, suggesting positive and negative outcomes of endorsement.

Social implications

Findings enhance understanding of the place of food and dining within societies and the influence of restaurant guides.

Originality/value

The paper offers an Asian perspective on and fresh insights into the role of local food cultures as well as the meanings and functions of the Michelin Guide.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Joan Henderson, Rodney McAdam and Edel O’ Neill

Northern Ireland Electricity is the largest listed plc in Northern Ireland. This article describes how the organization has managed its approach to total quality…

Abstract

Northern Ireland Electricity is the largest listed plc in Northern Ireland. This article describes how the organization has managed its approach to total quality management since privatization, in 1992. Examines specifically the third stage of a three‐stage approach, describing the strategic and operational integration of total quality management/business improvement. Describes the strategic partnership with the University of Ulster and discusses how this relationship has focused the organization on a journey of soul searching and learning. Explains how the self assessment approach, linked to balanced scorecards and performance planning review cycles, allows employee involvement in setting and achieving objectives. Finally, describes how the adoption of a learning based approach to business improvement, integrating thinking and doing, allows a fuller understanding of the issues and contributes to better results.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

The paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The paper finds that Muhammad Asad Sadi and Joan Henderson, in their article “In search of greener pastures: Al‐Marai and dairy food business in Saudi Arabia”, have provided a glimpse into a middle‐eastern commercial success story. The authors have gathered as much information as possible concerning the Saudi dairy company, Al‐Marai, their market position, their competition, and their operations, in order to provide a basis for discussion and analysis for future expansion and distribution policies.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Rodney McAdam, Shirley‐Ann Hazlett and Joan Henderson

Increasing competitive pressure from global markets and technological developments has resulted in the continual demand for business improvement philosophies and…

Abstract

Increasing competitive pressure from global markets and technological developments has resulted in the continual demand for business improvement philosophies and methodologies in operations management to address this challenge. The Six Sigma approach to business improvement has emerged in both the practitioner and academic literature as having a significant role in this area. There are many documented case studies of organizational applications of Six Sigma, where large‐scale improvements in defect and process measures have been attributed to this approach, mainly in the mass‐manufacturing sector. Moreover, there are claims, less well documented, that Six Sigma can be used as a change management approach at a strategic level and thus it can be applied to other sectors such as service industries. It is contended that there is a paucity of critical reviews of the Six Sigma literature, beyond that of descriptive accounts. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to critically review the literature of Six Sigma in relation to its effect on organizations and those that work in them. A broad theoretical perspective is used to guide the review process. The paper structure is based on the dichotomies within the Six Sigma literature, namely, what is Six Sigma — strategic change or operational methods; is Six Sigma a TQM appendage, or something new; will workers in a Six Sigma environment have more empowerment or be more controlled and is Six Sigma applicable to the service sector or only for that of the manufacturing sector?

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Joan C. Henderson

Singapore has seen success as an international destination with a steady rise in arrivals since the city-state became an independent republic in 1965. Tourism development…

Abstract

Singapore has seen success as an international destination with a steady rise in arrivals since the city-state became an independent republic in 1965. Tourism development is part of a broader program of economic and physical centralized planning which has transformed the island. The government has been very active and its pro-tourism policies have created an infrastructure and supply of attractions which render the country a center for leisure and business tourism. One element of the strategy has been constant upgrading and investment aimed at revitalization and sometimes reinvention. However, the authorities are facing unprecedented challenges due to general development pressures. Changing circumstances will demand a reappraisal of tourism policies and underlying assumptions.

Details

Tourism as an Instrument for Development: A Theoretical and Practical Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-680-6

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Joan C. Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to review the characteristics of new style visitor attractions and their role in sustainable destination development with specific reference…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the characteristics of new style visitor attractions and their role in sustainable destination development with specific reference to two projects in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a case study approach and is based on the analysis of information in the public domain obtained from a variety of print and electronic media sources.

Findings

Large scale purpose built facilities are seen to typify the new style of visitor attraction preferred by some officials and investors. They have the potential to be successful and contribute to sustainable destination development, but there are also some limitations to consider.

Originality/value

The paper illuminates the destination development strategies favoured by authorities and the challenges confronting those responsible for opening and operating new attractions.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Rodney McAdam, Shirley‐Ann Hazlett and Joan Henderson

The aim of this paper is to analyse how critical incidents or organisational crises can be used to check and legitimise quality management change efforts in relation to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to analyse how critical incidents or organisational crises can be used to check and legitimise quality management change efforts in relation to the fundamental principles of quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies analyse critical incidents that demonstrate the importance of legitimisation, normative evaluation and conflict constructs in this process. A theoretical framework composed of these constructs is used to guide the analysis.

Findings

The cases show that the critical incidents leading to the legitimisation of continuous improvement (CI) were diverse. However all resulted in the need for significant ongoing cost reduction to achieve or retain competitiveness. In addition, attempts at legitimising CI were coupled with attempts at destabilising the existing normative practice. This destabilisation process, in some cases, advocated supplementing the existing approaches and in others replacing them. In all cases, significant conflict arose in these legitimising and normative evaluation processes.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that further research could involve a critical analysis of existing quality models, tools and techniques in relation to how they incorporate, and are built upon, fundamental quality management principles. Furthermore, such studies could probe the dangers of quality curriculum becoming divorced from business and market reality and thus creating a parallel existence.

Practical implications

As demonstrated by the case studies, models, tools and techniques are not valued for their intrinsic value but rather for what they will contribute to addressing the business needs. Thus, in addition to being an opportunity for quality management, critical incidents present a challenge to the field. Quality management must be shown to make a contribution in these circumstances.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to both academics and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Joan C. Henderson

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the evolution of Singapore as a destination for international tourists, comparing contemporary circumstances with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the evolution of Singapore as a destination for international tourists, comparing contemporary circumstances with those existing 50 years ago when full independence was attained.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology is adopted and findings are derived from the analysis of materials in the public domain.

Findings

Function as a tourist destination cannot be understood without an appreciation of a place’s history and evolving general economic, political and socio-cultural conditions. These determine opportunities and constraints and thus the character and image of the destination from a tourism industry perspective. Singapore is shown to have undergone transformation as a country and consequently as a tourist centre under the leadership of a strong government which has brought prosperity to the now highly urbanised and industrialised city state. Achievements are considerable, although the future is one of some uncertainty as the wider context continues to change in ways which pose new challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s core argument is that performance as a destination cannot be separated from broader circumstances demonstrated by comparisons of Singapore’s tourism in 1965 and 2015 and the political, economic, socio-cultural and environmental contexts of the two periods.

Originality/value

While possessing many unique attributes related to its defining characteristics, the republic’s experiences afford valuable insights into the dynamics of destination development and especially in nations which are young, small and rapidly modernising.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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