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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Carmen Orte, Lluís Ballester, Martí X. March, Joan Amer, Marga Vives and Rosario Pozo

The purpose of this paper is to first assess the long-term effects of the adaptation of the American Strengthening Families Programme in Spain (known as the Programa de

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first assess the long-term effects of the adaptation of the American Strengthening Families Programme in Spain (known as the Programa de Competencia Familiar, translated into English as the Family Competence Programme (FCP)). The second aim is to identify family typologies and family changes regarding family competence over time. The paper’s initial hypothesis is that families have different behaviours and take advantage of the FCP in different ways.

Design/methodology/approach

Monitored applications of the FCP were conducted using a quasi-experimental design consisting of a control group and pre-test, post-test and two-year follow-up assessments. The sample was made up of 136 families who took part in the programme and another 18 who participated in the control groups. Validated instruments were applied to assess the methodological processes and the family assessments. A cluster analysis was undertaken to identify different family typologies and their evolution in relation to the FCP goals.

Findings

The FCP shows effective and consistent results over time for families in a variety of difficult situations, with important result maintenance. The longitudinal analysis (i.e. the two-year follow-up) demonstrates that the majority of changes identified (using the factors under consideration) maintained their relevance for most of the families, producing positive change.

Originality/value

There is little long-term evaluation or longitudinal analysis of family prevention programmes that are evidence-based and include cognitive-emotional content. This paper analyses the long-term evaluation of family prevention programmes and identifies the ways in which families change over time.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Carmen Orte and Joan Amer

162

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Cátia C. A. Magalhães and Karol L. Kumpfer

The purpose of this paper is to compare the outcomes from the Portuguese Strengthening Families Programme (SFP) with those from other countries to see if they are equally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the outcomes from the Portuguese Strengthening Families Programme (SFP) with those from other countries to see if they are equally effective despite the new context. SFP was selected for cultural adaptation because comparative effectiveness reviews find that SFP is the most effective parenting and family intervention (Foxcroft et al., 2003, 2012). Standardised cultural adaptations of SFP have resulted in successful outcomes in 35 countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The outcomes for the SFP six to 11 years Portuguese families (n=41) were compared to the SFP six to 11 years international norms (n=1,600) using a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control two group pre- and post-test design. A 2×2 ANOVA generated the outcome tables including p-values and Cohen’s d effect sizes. Standardised test scales were used and measured 21 parenting, family and child risk and protective factors.

Findings

Statistically significant positive results (p < 0.05) were found for 16 or 76.2 per cent of the 21 outcomes measured for Portuguese families. The Portuguese effect sizes were similar to the SFP international norms for improvements in the five parenting scales (d=0.61 vs 0.65), five family scales (d=0.68 vs 0.70) and seven children’s scales (d=0.48 vs 0.48) despite these norms having larger effect sizes than the USA norms. Hence, the cultural adaptation did not diminish the outcomes and SFP Portuguese families can benefit substantially from SFP participation.

Originality/value

A Portuguese culturally adapted version of SFP had never been developed or evaluated; hence, this paper reports original findings.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Susana Torío-López, José Vicente Peña-Calvo, Mercedes Inda-Caro, Carmen María Fernández-García and Carmen Rodríguez Menéndez

The purpose of the Building Everyday Life programme is to improve parenting outcomes through better sharing of family responsibilities and to encourage a strong sense of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the Building Everyday Life programme is to improve parenting outcomes through better sharing of family responsibilities and to encourage a strong sense of solidarity and community.

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been obtained from the pre-test and post-test applications, respectively, using two instruments: the Inventory of Parenting and Family Life Patterns and Resources, and the Final Evaluation Questionnaire for parents. The authors also use these tools to evaluate the degree to which the changes are maintained six months after the completion of the programme. Participants in the study comprised a group of 35 individuals that included parents in nuclear families and single mothers. The assessment process involved three stages: a pre-test assessment, a qualitative report (summative assessment) and, finally, a post-test assessment at least six months after completion of the programme.

Findings

The results show lasting changes over time. Regarding domestic work, parents say that they are more aware of the need to achieve a fairer and more equal distribution of the tasks in question. Families also report that they have perceived changes in the dimensions of communication and conflict resolution. Bearing in mind the limited nature of the aforementioned changes, the results suggest the need for support processes over time, as well as the establishment of follow-up sessions with families.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the study is to show that the Building Everyday Life programme is effective and valuable in improving parental educational styles.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Gregor Burkhart

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the potential of technology transfer in prevention interventions. It argues that contextual factors are more identifiable and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the potential of technology transfer in prevention interventions. It argues that contextual factors are more identifiable and more malleable than the cliché of “culture” as a barrier to implementation might suggest. The key question is how various contextual factors impact on programme implementation and effectiveness in the different cultures of a multifaceted continent such as Europe, and how successful programmes adapt to various contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire survey, input was collected from people involved in the adaptation and implementation of the Strengthening Families Programme (SFP) in several European countries.

Findings

The publications and experiences of the SFP implementers and evaluators in most of the European countries where it was introduced suggest that the programme is both feasible and effective (where outcomes are available). To achieve this, however, the implementers spent a considerable amount of time and effort to prepare, pre-test and consult with their target populations in order to adjust SFP to culture and context. This paper suggests restricting the use of “culture” to a set of norms and values, and to distinguish this from “context” which describes social and political organisation. Even though both condition each other, it is helpful to address culture and context separately when adapting prevention programmes.

Research limitations/implications

Outcome data were not available for all implementations of SFP and some very recent ones in Austria, France and Italy could not be included in the questionnaire survey.

Practical implications

An examination of social capital might help implementers to anticipate resistance from the target population that seems to emanate from history, culture and context. The level of trust of others and institutions and the willingness to co-operate with them can heavily influence the readiness of drug prevention service planners, commissioners and providers, as well as the target population, to adopt interventions and other behaviours. Programmes seem to have key principles that make them effective and that should not be modified in an adaptation: a particular example is the programme protocol. Other aspects, such as wording, pictures and the content of examples used to illustrate some issues do have to be modified and are essential for an intervention to be well-accepted and understood. In some programmes, the effective principles – so-called “kernels” – are identifiable although, overall, prevention research still strives to identify them.

Social implications

Implementing complex programmes that require the cooperation of many stakeholders might increase social capital in the communities involved.

Originality/value

The paper examines the common belief among many European prevention professionals that programmes from abroad, particularly from North America, cannot be implemented in Europe.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Carmen Orte, Lluís Ballester, Martí X. March, Josep L. Oliver, Belén Pascual and Maria Antònia Gomila

This research assesses the predictive capacity of key factors in the development of family competences: parent-children relationship, family involvement, family resilience and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research assesses the predictive capacity of key factors in the development of family competences: parent-children relationship, family involvement, family resilience and positive parenting. It also aims to establish which are the most discriminating factors between the groups showing the most and the least prosocial behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves a longitudinal study of one child from 181 families; 155 families in the experimental group and 26 in the control group. Both boys and girls are included and their ages range from 8 to 14 years. The instruments employed are all validated for use with a Spanish population and include Karol Kumpfer’s questionnaires on family competence and the BASC questionnaire.

Findings

All of the factors analysed, with the exception of family involvement, proved to be predictive for prosocial behaviour, and the most discriminating among these were: parent-children relationship, family resilience and positive parenting.

Originality/value

One key issue in family prevention programmes is the development of prosocial behaviour. In this sense, the research developed here aims at highlighting protective factors as key to developing a prosocial behaviour.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Metin Özdemir

Parenting programmes are seen as feasible and cost-effective in preventing early behavioural problems in children and adolescents. A number of studies have concluded that such…

Abstract

Purpose

Parenting programmes are seen as feasible and cost-effective in preventing early behavioural problems in children and adolescents. A number of studies have concluded that such programmes are effective in reducing child problem behaviours and improving the skills and well-being of parents. Nevertheless, less is known about long-term programme effects. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A non-meta-analytic discussion.

Findings

Long-term evaluations of parenting programmes suffer from a number of methodological weaknesses resulting in an inability to make robust causal inferences about child and parent outcomes in the longer term. The current evidence is favourable but is likely to be biased by methodological weaknesses. There is a need for more studies of greater methodological strength to obtain conclusive evidence that would guide empirical research, practice and policy.

Originality/value

The paper discusses weaknesses in long-term evaluations of parenting programmes and highlights concrete future directions towards improving the quality of study design, evaluation and data analysis.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Li‐teh Sun

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American…

Abstract

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American preemptive invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq and the subsequent prisoner abuse, such an existence seems to be farther and farther away from reality. The purpose of this work is to stop this dangerous trend by promoting justice, love, and peace through a change of the paradigm that is inconsistent with justice, love, and peace. The strong paradigm that created the strong nation like the U.S. and the strong man like George W. Bush have been the culprit, rather than the contributor, of the above three universal ideals. Thus, rather than justice, love, and peace, the strong paradigm resulted in in justice, hatred, and violence. In order to remove these three and related evils, what the world needs in the beginning of the third millenium is the weak paradigm. Through the acceptance of the latter paradigm, the golden mean or middle paradigm can be formulated, which is a synergy of the weak and the strong paradigm. In order to understand properly the meaning of these paradigms, however, some digression appears necessary.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Li‐teh Sun

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American…

Abstract

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American preemptive invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq and the subsequent prisoner abuse, such an existence seems to be farther and farther away from reality. The purpose of this work is to stop this dangerous trend by promoting justice, love, and peace through a change of the paradigm that is inconsistent with justice, love, and peace. The strong paradigm that created the strong nation like the U.S. and the strong man like George W. Bush have been the culprit, rather than the contributor, of the above three universal ideals. Thus, rather than justice, love, and peace, the strong paradigm resulted in in justice, hatred, and violence. In order to remove these three and related evils, what the world needs in the beginning of the third millenium is the weak paradigm. Through the acceptance of the latter paradigm, the golden mean or middle paradigm can be formulated, which is a synergy of the weak and the strong paradigm. In order to understand properly the meaning of these paradigms, however, some digression appears necessary.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

David Everett

According to the introduction, this five volume set is intended to update Eric H. Boehm and Lalit Adolphus's Historical Periodicals: An Annotated World List of Historical and

Abstract

According to the introduction, this five volume set is intended to update Eric H. Boehm and Lalit Adolphus's Historical Periodicals: An Annotated World List of Historical and Related Serial Publications (Santa Barbara, CA: Clio Press, 1961). That goal is met admirably. The editors have combed the standard periodical sources, as well as the periodical lists of relevant European indexing services, and produced a list of 8,900 periodicals in history and related fields. The coverage is worldwide. While the United States has the most entries, these entries represent only about fifteen percent of the total.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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