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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Gerard P. Hodgkinson, Jo Padmore and Anne E. Tomes

Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis techniques arecommonly employed for the analysis of consumer perceptions of products.However, within the past 10‐15 years, a…

Abstract

Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis techniques are commonly employed for the analysis of consumer perceptions of products. However, within the past 10‐15 years, a growing volume of research has shown that the processes underlying similarities judgements of stimuli are incompatible with the fundamental underlying axioms of these techniques. A series of papers in the psychometrics and cognitive psychology literatures by Tversky and his associates have demonstrated the inability of these procedures to handle similarities data from many domains by virtue of the restrictive assumptions they impose on the data. Recently, several procedures have been proposed that overcome the limitations of traditional multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis techniques. The potential benefits are illustrated of applying two of these newer techniques, additive similarity trees (ADDTREE) and extended similarity trees (EXTREE) in the context of marketing research. Consumers′ similarity judgements data are presented from three disparate product domains (newspapers, shops and breakfast cereals). In each case, non‐metric multidimensional scaling and average linkage cluster analysis yield less interpretable solutions than ADDTREE. In the case of the newspapers data, much richer insights are obtained with reference to EXTREE. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for market research studies and the development of consumer behaviour theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Julieta Ojeda‐Gomez, Mike Simpson, S.C. Lenny Koh and Jo Padmore

To provide a systemic view of competitive advantage in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). Gaining a competitive advantage involves a process that evolves over…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a systemic view of competitive advantage in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). Gaining a competitive advantage involves a process that evolves over time and which considers the role of three factors: the entrepreneur, the firm's resources and capabilities and the supporting institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was selected as an exploratory research method. Many of the findings were based on secondary data while results were confirmed or complemented to some extent by primary data. Primary data were collected via an electronic questionnaire and semi‐structured telephone interviews with SMEs' owners in the Mexican footwear industry.

Findings

Changes in the business environment may transform the grounds on which SMEs conduct their business. Consequently, adaptation, new relationships and creativity may emerge as a way to overcome scarcity of resources and/or difficulties in gaining access to resources that contribute to their competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The results present only a preliminary picture limited to the period 1985‐1999. Furthermore, most findings from the primary data refer to responses provided by medium‐sized enterprises so the position of small enterprises may need to be revised.

Originality/value

Findings may pose interesting implications for entrepreneurs, policymakers and supporting institutions, for the way in which they work together and the impact this may have on SMEs' competitive advantage.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Mike Simpson, Jo Padmore, Nick Taylor and Jane Frecknall‐Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to report on a full‐scale testing of the role of marketing and its relevance in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The objective is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a full‐scale testing of the role of marketing and its relevance in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The objective is to present the results of a rigorous assessment of a new model of marketing in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist approach relied on the use of the hypothetico‐deductive method to produce the theoretical model. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were applied to investigate the model. This paper reports on a large‐scale questionnaire survey, follow‐up interviews with SMEs owner‐managers and the use of published accounts to show how companies have performed during this study.

Findings

The role and relevance model of marketing in SMEs has been thoroughly investigated and tested. The model offers a straightforward way of diagnosing the situation within an SME. The simplicity of the model allows for a clearer understanding of what is often a complex and messy situation within these companies and their business environment. Some findings suggest a positive link between a company's financial performance and its approach to marketing within the model.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that the model goes a long way to explaining the behaviour of SMEs with regard to marketing. The model appears to be viable and could be used to analyse and diagnose the situation regarding marketing within SMEs.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique theoretical and practical insight into the issue of marketing in SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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