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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Yen Ming Zhang and Pak Tee Ng

Yi Jing is one of the most archaic works among the Chinese classics. Various schools of thought developed their philosophies from the philosophical perspectives in this…

Abstract

Purpose

Yi Jing is one of the most archaic works among the Chinese classics. Various schools of thought developed their philosophies from the philosophical perspectives in this book and its influence is wide ranging and far reaching. This paper attempts to show how leaders can approach the Yi Jing beneficially by identifying the principles, values and virtues in each of the 64 scenarios, deriving insights about change and leadership. It also aims to show how the Yi Jing compares with Western management literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an analysis of Qian Gua of Yi Jing as an example of how leaders can draw insights from Yi Jing about change and leadership.

Findings

Qian Gua, which is the first scenario in the Yi Jing, offers us powerful insights about change and leadership by offering: a framework of understanding change and human enterprises, considering the aspects of beginning, process, benefit and sustainability; a framework to understand the leadership development process; and leadership principles of conscientious self‐cultivation, transformational leadership through virtues and riding the tides of change.

Practical implications

A change and leadership model inspired by the Yi Jing should interest business leaders both in the east and the west, and help Westerners gain success in doing business in China or collaborating with the Chinese on a joint venture.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to draw insights about change and leadership through an analysis of Qian Gua of Yi Jing.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Cham Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to concern the community festival of a Jing minority village in the China–Vietnam border area. Since it was designated as a national-level…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to concern the community festival of a Jing minority village in the China–Vietnam border area. Since it was designated as a national-level Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2006, the festival has undergone many changes. The festival has steadily expanded and evolved, assuming characteristics of globalization. How is the globalized character of the Wanwei festival manifested? What are the forces behind the elevation of this local festival onto the register of national events and how did it turn into an event organized by the township?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the results of the author’s research on the culture of Kinh people in Wanwei from 2000 to the present. From the anthropological approach, the author mainly uses method of participant observation and in-depth interviews. The author has observed the Wanwei communal festival from 2000 to the present, interviewing about 40 villagers in Wanwei in depth, they can be leaders, intellectuals, civil servants, officials or working people.

Findings

The paper is a case study of the new aspect of globalization of a village festival. The author argues that globalization can lead to a spread of global flows but in this process of globalization, villagers also want to define the local identity, they reinvent the tradition, rewrite history, create new nuances for the gods with many different purposes. Practicing the current Wanwei village festival is a vivid example of globalization from below and the politics of tradition.

Originality/value

The paper adds a theoretical dimension to current globalization research. The paper also points out the political, economic and social dynamics that govern the transformation of a village festival in particular and the village culture in general in the border areas. The paper is a testament to the dynamism and flexibility of villagers when participating in the current globalization process.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Allison Carr and Pearl Ly

The purpose of this paper is to show how images and videos of search strategies can enhance student experiences in reference interactions by providing a visual and/or…

2503

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how images and videos of search strategies can enhance student experiences in reference interactions by providing a visual and/or auditory explanation, rather than written step‐by‐step instructions. This paper explores how online screencasting tools, such as Jing, can be used to quickly create and share on‐the‐fly videos and images.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review briefly discusses uses of screencasting in higher education and the implications for Millennial students, followed by a discussion of how librarians at California State University, San Marcos are creating screencasting videos and images to enhance chat/instant messaging, e‐mail, and in‐person reference interactions.

Findings

Based on chat transcripts and anecdotal evidence, students find librarians' use of screencasting helpful in illustrating complex search strategies to find information resources.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to determine if screencasting is an effective learning tool for Millennial students, as well as, other library users in both reference interactions and instructional settings.

Practical implications

Online screencasting tools are easy‐to‐use, low‐cost, and can be used in any type of library, specifically for reference services. In virtual reference, librarians can quickly create and share instructional videos rather than type detailed instructions for accessing library and information resources.

Originality/value

While screencasting tools such as Captivate and Camtasia are widely used in library instruction, they are new to reference delivery. Since many reference interactions include instructional components, on‐the‐fly screencasting can be a useful tool to enhance the user's reference and learning experience.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Natalie Tagge

The purpose of this paper is to provide an examination of how web conferencing software and screencasting software has been used to provide training to librarians…

445

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an examination of how web conferencing software and screencasting software has been used to provide training to librarians participating in the Illinois State Library's AskAway Illinois virtual reference cooperative.

Design/methodology/approach

Brief overview of the features of the web conferencing and screencasting software used, Wimba and Jing, respectively, is provided followed by a discussion of the implementation of these products as librarian training tools within the AskAway Illinois. Recommendations for training with these tools are also made based on experience and a review of the literature.

Findings

Using an online synchronous environment (Wimba) to provide AskAway Illinois introductory training ensures all librarians joining the cooperative have at least a basic level of knowledge. Follow‐up training is sometimes necessary and is best accomplished using an online asynchronous method (Jing) that is more convenient than a synchronous environment and is more informative than email or a phone call.

Originality/value

An example of how Wimba and Jing are implemented for librarian training is provided. Examples of best practices for using web conferencing and screencasting software to train librarians on new technology are also provided.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Juliette Koning and Can‐Seng Ooi

Researchers rarely present accounts of their awkward encounters in ethnographies. Awkwardness, however, does matter and affects the ethnographic accounts we write and our…

1325

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers rarely present accounts of their awkward encounters in ethnographies. Awkwardness, however, does matter and affects the ethnographic accounts we write and our understanding of social situations. The purpose is to bring these hidden sides of organizational ethnography to the fore, to discuss the consequences of ignoring awkward encounters, and to improve our understanding of organizational realities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents awkward ethnographic encounters in the field: encounters with evangelizing ethnic Chinese business people in Indonesia (Koning), and visiting an artist village in China (Ooi). Based on analysing their awkwardness, and in the context of a critical assessment of the reflexive turn in ethnography, the authors propose a more inclusive reflexivity. The paper ends with formulating several points supportive of reaching inclusive reflexivity.

Findings

By investigating awkward encounters, the authors show that these experiences have been left out for political (publishing culture in academia, unwritten rules of ethnography), as well as personal (feelings of failure, unwelcome self‐revelations) reasons, while there is much to discover from these encounters. Un‐paralyzing reflexivity means to include the awkward, the emotional, and admit the non‐rational aspects of our ethnographic experiences; such inclusive reflexivity is incredibly insightful.

Research limitations/implications

Inclusive reflexivity not only allows room for the imperfectness of the researcher, but also enables a fuller and deeper representation of the groups and communities we aim to understand and, thus, will enhance the trustworthiness and quality of our ethnographic work.

Originality/value

Awkwardness is rarely acknowledged, not to mention discussed, in organizational ethnography.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Jane Zheng

The purpose of this paper is to understand urban sculpture venues that emerged in the recent decade and their connections to the on-going entrepreneurial urban policies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand urban sculpture venues that emerged in the recent decade and their connections to the on-going entrepreneurial urban policies and urban strategies in Shanghai. How does this phenomenon relate to Shanghai’s urban policies? How does urban sculpture development reflect the nature and characteristics of the urban sculpture authority?

Design/methodology/approach

Case study is the major research method used to achieve an in-depth understanding of the developmental processes, mechanisms and characteristics of urban sculpture projects. Three cases were selected and studied using purposeful sampling methods, including Duolun Road Sculpture Project (2002), the Shanghai International Sculpture Center (2006) and the Jing’an Sculpture Park (2009).

Findings

A twofold main argument is established in this paper. Urban sculpture venues emerged as a new type of instrument to advance urban entrepreneurial policies; the use of this instrument, however, also involves politics in that art politically transforms the features and functions of open spaces in Shanghai.

Originality/value

Although scholarly interest in exploring cultural development through urban planning in the Chinese context is evident, urban sculpture planning (termed as “urban sculpture” in the Chinese ideological context) in Chinese metropolitan cities, in particular, is an unexplored topic, and thus leaves a gap in the knowledge. This paper introduces a new conceptual model, i.e., “aesthetic regime,” to describe the role of the urban sculpture authority in the development of the urban sculpture scene. It looks at the artistic representation of artworks, design of the sculpture venues, functionality of the artworks and social mechanisms for the actualization of these projects. An evolutional trend of the three sites across the decade is concerned.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

An Minh Ngoc, Hiroaki Nishiuchi and Nguyen Thi Nhu

This study aimed two objectives: The first objective was to explore carriers' intentions to use cargo electric vehicles (EVs) and the factors influencing these intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed two objectives: The first objective was to explore carriers' intentions to use cargo electric vehicles (EVs) and the factors influencing these intentions in last-mile delivery (LMD). The other objective was to provide recommendations for policymakers and manufacturers to promote and customize cargo EVs to meet the requirements of carriers in the LMD sector.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study the authors constructed a research framework that adjusted and extended the original technology acceptance model (TAM). The proposed model combines eight psychological factors, including attitude, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived risk, public engagement, face consciousness, financial incentive policy and carrier intention, in which four factors, namely attitude, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and intention, were obtained from the original TAM and the four remaining factors, namely perceived risk, public engagement, face consciousness and financial incentive policy, were added.

Findings

The results showed that psychological factors such as attitude, perceived ease of use, perceived risk, public engagement and face consciousness might affect carriers' intentions to use electric cargo vehicles in LMD service in Vietnamese cities. These results agree with the previous studies and confirm that attitude, perceived ease of use, perceived risk, public engagement and face consciousness might be important for shaping intention to use electric cargo vehicles in emerging markets.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations, first, the data were collected in Vietnam, a country with weak academic contributions. Therefore, these findings might not be generalizable to other areas. The authors expect to apply the same research framework to other countries to explore the similarities and differences across the countries. Second, the authors conducted the surveys in three cities; except for Hanoi, the other two cities are not really large markets in the LMD service sector. Third, the authors ignored the relationship between the demographic characteristics and electric cargo vehicles. Further studies should address this gap.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, manufacturers should ensure the high-quality performance of electric cargo vehicles in terms of extending driving range and shortening recharging time. Policymakers should develop the roadmaps for electric cargo vehicles, starting from switching from conventional cargo motorcycles to electric motorcycles. In addition, developing public charging infrastructure should be prioritized, which is the fundamental basis for operating electric cargo vehicles. Finally, manufacturers should research and develop a product that would improve the reputation of carriers because carriers with higher face consciousness are more likely to pursue brand-name and high-priced products in order to enhance their reputation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in two aspects: First, the authors investigated intentions to use electric cargo vehicles in LMD service, which is rare from other studies, and they further identified the psychological determinants of carriers' intentions. Second, the findings increase the knowledge of carriers' intentions and suggest implications for policymakers and manufacturers to promote the adoption of electric cargo vehicles in last-mile deliver service.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Danielle Ashcroft, Temitope Egbelakin, John Jing and Eziaku Onyeizu Rasheed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the economic viability of a new and innovative seismic damage resisting system (SDRS) device by conducting a feasibility study. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the economic viability of a new and innovative seismic damage resisting system (SDRS) device by conducting a feasibility study. The SDRS device has been patented and specifically designed to be implemented in multi-storey modular buildings in seismic regions such as New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, two sample modular multi-storey buildings were purposively selected for the study. A cost-comparison analysis was conducted using the SDRS device in the two buildings, by carrying out a measure and price exercise of the construction elements.

Findings

The research results showed that the SDRS device is an economically viable option for mitigating seismic damage in modular multi-storey buildings in New Zealand. There is an average of 7.34 per cent of cost reduction when SDRS is used in modular multi-storey buildings when compared to other seismic resistance systems such as base isolation, moment resisting frames and friction damper systems.

Practical implications

The economic viability of the SDRS presents an opportunity for its usage in modular design and construction of multi-storey buildings. SDRS system is also applicable to other building typologies and construction methods. The use of SDRS also aligns with the current national objective to provide more affordable and resilient housing within a limited time; the opportunity is considered significant in New Zealand, including for export and manufacturing.

Originality/value

The confirmation of the SDRS device’s economic feasibility is the original contribution of the authors.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Maria Ghosn-Chelala and Wessam Al-Chibani

The purpose of this paper is to explore screencasting as a computer-mediated feedback approach for Arabic native (L1) speakers taking an English as a foreign language…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore screencasting as a computer-mediated feedback approach for Arabic native (L1) speakers taking an English as a foreign language (EFL) college remedial writing class.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study focused on an EFL remedial writing class consisting of eight Lebanese, Arabic L1 students at a private university in Lebanon. Students received screencast feedback through Jing® for one essay intended to assist them with subsequent revision. The multimodal screencast videos included indirect corrections, annotations, and oral commentary guided by a rubric. Students then completed a perspectives survey on screencast feedback. The instructor also led an informal group discussion to allow for further elaboration of students’ responses.

Findings

Students reported that screencasting’s multimodality provided for better engagement and support of learning preferences. They also perceived screencast feedback to be clearer and more useful than traditional written feedback.

Research limitations/implications

This study applied screencasting to address feedback challenges pertaining to clarity, learning preferences, and engagement. As this was a classroom case study, further research using a larger sample is recommended.

Originality/value

The aim of research into computer-mediated human feedback is to address such challenges as increasing student engagement, improving clarity, and responding to students’ preferences. Studies of screencast feedback have been few, particularly for EFL writing students. A survey of the literature indicates the need to explore contextualized classroom feedback case studies and approaches to enhance feedback.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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