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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Simarjeet Singh, Nidhi Walia, Sivagandhi Saravanan, Preeti Jain, Avtar Singh and Jinesh jain

This study aims to recognize the current dynamics, prolific contributors and salient trends and propose future research directions in the area of alternative momentum investing.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to recognize the current dynamics, prolific contributors and salient trends and propose future research directions in the area of alternative momentum investing.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a blend of electronic database and forward reference searching to ensure the incorporation of all the significant studies. With the help of the Scopus database, the present study retrieves 122 research papers published from 1999 to 2020.

Findings

The results reveal that alternative momentum investing is an emerging area in the field of momentum investing. However, this area has witnessed an exponential growth in last ten years. The study also finds that North American, West European and East Asian countries dominate in total research publications. Through network citation analysis, the study identifies five major clusters: industrial momentum, earnings momentum, 52-week high momentum, time-series momentum and risk-managed momentum.

Research limitations/implications

The present review will serve as a guide for financial researchers who intend to work on alternative momentum approaches. The study proposes several unexplored research themes in alternative momentum investing on which future studies can focus.

Originality/value

The study embellishes the existing literature on momentum investing by contributing the first bibliometric review on alternative momentum approaches.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Anchal Arora, Jinesh Jain, Sanjay Gupta and Ajay Sharma

In today's competitive environment, sustainability is talked out in every sphere of life. Sustainability is a key to stability and for that roots are being focused by…

Abstract

Purpose

In today's competitive environment, sustainability is talked out in every sphere of life. Sustainability is a key to stability and for that roots are being focused by incorporating sustainability in higher education. The basic purpose of this paper is to prioritize the sustainability drivers in the higher education system. This research will provide fruitful insight into the sustainability drivers in the higher education system to the education industry and policymakers.

Design/methodology/approach

The present research is conducted on the 400 students studying in four major universities in the state of Punjab. Fuzzy analytical hierarchy process was applied to prioritize the sustainability drivers in the higher education system. The primary factors considered for the present study include social-people (social responsibility), environmental-planet (sustainable environmental practices) and financial-profit (economic value created).

Findings

The most influential criteria were environmental-planet (sustainable environmental practices) and social-people (social responsibility). The five most influential subcriteria were “Student engagement in eco co-curricular activities (C21)”, Energy efficiency measures (C23)”, “The HEI as a job driver in the city (C11)”, “Total direct energy consumption (C31)” and “Support from the HEI for local initiatives and help in growing the sustainability of the community or region (C12)”.

Research limitations/implications

Although the sample survey conducted in this study was focused on a small sample selected from the state of Punjab which genuinely represented the total population, it is still considered as a limitation for the present study.

Practical implications

The outcome of this research provides policymakers with a better understanding of the sustainability drivers in higher education. This will further help them toward achieving the aim of sustainability.

Originality/value

The present research is based on the available literature on sustainability and the results of the study would add value to the existing knowledge base.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Jinesh Jain, Nidhi Walia and Sanjay Gupta

Research in the area of behavioral finance has demonstrated that investors exhibit irrational behavior while making investment decisions. Investor behavior usually…

Abstract

Purpose

Research in the area of behavioral finance has demonstrated that investors exhibit irrational behavior while making investment decisions. Investor behavior usually deviates from logic and reason, and consequently, investors exhibit various behavioral biases which impact their investment decisions. The purpose of this paper is to rank the behavioral biases influencing the investment decision making of individual equity investors from the state of Punjab, India. This research would provide valuable insight into the different behavioral biases to investors and other participants of the capital market and help them in improving investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is conducted on the individual equity investors of Punjab, India. Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process was applied to rank the factors influencing the decision making of individual equity investors of Punjab. The primary factors considered for the study are overconfidence bias, representative bias, anchoring bias, availability bias, regret aversion bias, loss aversion bias, mental accounting bias and herding bias.

Findings

The three most influential criteria were herding bias, loss aversion bias and overconfidence bias. The five most influential sub-criteria were “I readily sell shares that have increased in value (C61),” “News about the company (Newspapers, TV and magazines) affects my investment decision (C84),” “I invest each element of my investment portfolio separately (C71)” and “I usually hold loosing stock for long time, expecting trend reversal (C52).”

Research limitations/implications

Although sample survey conducted in the present study was based on a limited sample selected from a particular area that truly represented the total population, it is considered as the limitation of this study.

Practical implications

The outcome of this research provides investors with a better understanding of behavioral biases that influence their decision making. This study provides them a guideline on different behavioral biases that they should consider while making investment decisions.

Originality/value

The research model is based on the available literature on behavioral finance and the research results and findings would add value to the existing knowledge base.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

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