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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Michael J. Gross, Songshan (Sam) Huang and Yi Ding

The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of mainland Chinese hotel firm internationalisation relative to traditional Western internationalisation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of mainland Chinese hotel firm internationalisation relative to traditional Western internationalisation theory through an analysis of the Shanghai Jin Jiang International Hotels Group’s joint venture with the Thayer Lodging Group to acquire Interstate Hotels & Resorts.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was used to examine the three firms involved in the joint venture acquisition. The technique of elite interviews was used to collect primary data. Semi-structured personal interviews were conducted with senior corporate executives who were engaged as principals with the conception, execution and administration of the joint venture. Content analysis was performed with the interview data, seeking themes and patterns consistent with the study purpose.

Findings

The findings demonstrated specific characteristics that distinguish the internationalisation that Jin Jiang has pursued. The five distinctive characteristics were as follows: a “leap” market entry mode, a pattern of “a small fish eats a big fish”, a preference for purchasing hotels in the West, capital sourcing from Chinese banks and strategic rather than operational control of the acquired firm.

Research limitations/implications

The findings indicate both similarities and differences between the China context of hotel firm internationalisation and that of Western firms. Theoretical implications are examined through an analysis of Dunning’s OLI (ownership, location, internalisation) framework. Generalisability of empirical findings may be limited by the China context and the unique combination of three firms.

Practical implications

The findings advance our understanding of the relationship between Chinese and Western practices, particularly in the approaches that firms take in internationalisation.

Originality/value

The story reported in this paper is about the first firm internationalisation endeavour in the mainland Chinese hotel industry. This is a landmark event for the international hospitality industry that will have historical significance, and represents the leading edge of mainland Chinese hotel firm cross-border expansion. This study contributes an early analysis of how the Chinese hotel sector may approach internationalisation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

Md Sadaqul Bari and Byoungho Ellie Jin

The purpose of this study is to identify the emergence of apparel brands in Bangladesh: their timing, order and the reasons behind the patterns. This study also examined…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the emergence of apparel brands in Bangladesh: their timing, order and the reasons behind the patterns. This study also examined whether these evolution patterns followed the same path in Korea and India.

Design/methodology/approach

By employing secondary research method, this study gathered and analyzed data from companies, trade organizations, news media and academic articles to determine the socioeconomic backgrounds and underlying dynamics that propelled the evolution patterns. Following Jin et al.'s (2013) approach, we analyzed three types of apparel brands (international, national and private) in Bangladesh.

Findings

The findings indicated that in contrast with Korea and India, in Bangladesh (a) the emergence of international brands occurred after the national brands' appearance in the More Advanced Production of Fabric and Apparel stage, (b) national brands also emerged at the same stage and earlier than the international brands developed, and (c) internationalization of national brands and emergence of private brands were not observed. The differences in the emergent timing and order were explained by socioeconomic and cultural aspects, along with industry life cycle perspectives.

Practical implications

Findings indicate that the Bangladeshi market is dominated by national apparel brands. Therefore, international brands are advised to consider the business strategies of local competitors and develop their own pricing and merchandising strategies to maintain their supremacy as premium brands.

Originality/value

This study addressed apparel brand evolution patterns in a lower middle-income country. The results revealed some unique aspects. Unlike in other developing countries, national brand development in Bangladesh was initiated by entrepreneurs.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2021

Yen-I Lee, Xuerong Lu and Yan Jin

Although uncertainty has been identified as a key crisis characteristic and a multi-faceted construct essential to effective crisis management research and practice, only…

Abstract

Purpose

Although uncertainty has been identified as a key crisis characteristic and a multi-faceted construct essential to effective crisis management research and practice, only a few studies examined publics' perceived uncertainty with a focus on crisis severity uncertainty, leaving crisis responsibility uncertainty uninvestigated in organizational crisis settings.

Design/methodology/approach

To close this research gap empirically, this study employed data from an online survey of a total of 817 US adults to examine how participants' crisis responsibility uncertainty and their attribution-based crisis emotions might impact their crisis responses such as further crisis information seeking.

Findings

First, findings show that participants' crisis responsibility uncertainty was negatively associated with their attribution-independent (AI) crisis emotions (i.e. anxiety, fear, apprehension and sympathy) and external-attribution-dependent (EAD) crisis emotions (i.e. disgust, contempt, anger and sadness), but positively associated with internal-attribution-dependent (IAD) crisis emotions (i.e. guilt, embarrassment and shame). Second, crisis responsibility uncertainty and AI crisis emotions were positive predictors for participants' further crisis information seeking. Third, AI crisis emotions and IAD crisis emotions were parallel mediators for the relationship between participants' crisis responsibility uncertainty and their further crisis information seeking.

Practical implications

Organizations need to pay attention to the perceived uncertainty about crisis responsibility and attribution-based crisis emotions since they can impact the decision of seeking crisis information during an ongoing organizational crisis.

Originality/value

This study improves uncertainty management in organizational crisis communication research and practice, connecting crisis responsibility uncertainty, attribution-based crisis emotions and publics' crisis information seeking.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Milo Shaoqing Wang and Michael Lounsbury

Narrow, managerially centered notions of organizational culture remain hegemonic, marginalizing richer, anthropological approaches as well as efforts to understand how the…

Abstract

Narrow, managerially centered notions of organizational culture remain hegemonic, marginalizing richer, anthropological approaches as well as efforts to understand how the beliefs and practices of organizations are fundamentally shaped by the wider societal dynamics within which they are embedded. In this paper, the authors draw upon recent efforts to explore the interface of scholarship on practice and the institutional logics perspective to highlight the utility of a practice-driven institutional approach to the study of organizational culture that brings society back in. Empirically, the authors present a longitudinal case study of a Chinese private enterprise, and analyze how the unfolding dynamics of a strong community logic increasingly affected by a rising market logic, shaped the formation of political coalitions internally and externally as organizational members aimed to maintain truces between the push and pull of logics over a period of 22 years. Through an analysis of seven episodes that we conceptualize as “cultural encounters,” the authors find that a combination of compartmentalization and overall integration of logics contributes to provisional truces, and that people in the same cohort who share common geographic socialization are more likely to form allies. Our aim is to encourage future scholars to study how societal beliefs and practices work their way into organizations in a variety of explicit as well as more mundane, hidden ways.

Details

On Practice and Institution: New Empirical Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-416-5

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Xin Jin and Karin Weber

The purpose of this study was to provide a holistic view of exhibition destination attractiveness by examining perceptions of two of the three key stakeholders (exhibition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to provide a holistic view of exhibition destination attractiveness by examining perceptions of two of the three key stakeholders (exhibition organizers and visitors) and contrasting them with those of exhibitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a mixed method approach, collecting 535 responses from visitors attending nine business-to-business exhibitions in four major cities in China via structured surveys. In addition, eight in-depth interviews with CEOs/owners of leading global and Chinese exhibition companies were conducted.

Findings

The findings revealed that exhibitors may go almost anywhere where there is potential for successful business. In contrast, visitors prefer exhibition destinations with good accessibility to minimize travel time and an attractive leisure environment that offers a degree of enjoyment in addition to taking care of business. A destination’s “economic environment” and “cluster effects” were comparatively less important to them. Organizers were cognizant of these differences, contributing to their reluctance in taking large-scale, branded exhibitions to second-tier destinations, despite considerable efforts by these cities to improve their infrastructure.

Practical implications

This study offers practical guidelines for destination administrators and exhibition organizers with regard to evaluating destination resources for long-term exhibition development.

Originality/value

In contrast to prior studies, this research identifies significant differences in perceptions of exhibition destination attractiveness among all three key industry stakeholders. It also presents a persuasive case for the need to clearly differentiate between the attractiveness of a destination for attracting/hosting exhibitions versus conventions, rather than approaching the subject from a more generic meetings, incentives, conferences, and exhibitions (MICE) segment/business events perspective.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Celeste C. Wells, Rebecca Gill and James McDonald

– The purpose of this paper is to explore intersectionality as accomplished in interaction, and particularly national difference as a component of intersectionality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore intersectionality as accomplished in interaction, and particularly national difference as a component of intersectionality.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use ethnographic, shadowing methods to examine intersectionality in-depth and developed vignettes to illuminate the experience of intersectionality.

Findings

National difference mitigated the common assumption in scientific work that tenure and education are the most important markers of acceptance and collegiality. Moreover, national difference was a more prominent driving occupational discourse in scientific work than gender.

Research limitations/implications

The data were limited in scope, though the authors see this as a necessity for generating in-depth intersectional data. Implications question the prominence of gender and (domestic) race/gender as “the” driving discourses of difference in much scholarship and offer a new view into how organizing around identity happens. Specifically, the authors develop “intersectional pairs” to understand the paradoxes of intersectionality, and as comprising a larger, woven experience of “intersectional netting.”

Social implications

This research draws critical attention to how assumptions regarding national difference shape workplace experiences, in an era of intensified global migration and immigration debates.

Originality/value

The study foregrounds the negotiation of national difference in US workplaces, and focusses on how organization around said difference happens interactively in communication.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Michael J. Gross and Songshan (Sam) Huang

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the internationalisation prospects of Chinese domestic hotel firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the internationalisation prospects of Chinese domestic hotel firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined the Jin Jiang Hotel Group, China's largest domestic hotel firm. The qualitative method of semi‐structured personal interviews was selected in the design of this exploratory study to address the research question: What are the factors guiding Jin Jiang's considerations for internationalisation? Personal interviews were conducted with the senior corporate headquarters' management in Shanghai.

Findings

The findings indicate that the firm is in a stage of pre‐internationalisation in its organisational development, and has adopted a cautious and passive approach on its path towards internationalisation. This paper identifies company abilities, government support, marketing and brand strategy, network and management standards, state‐owned enterprise (SOE) related problems, human resources and other external opportunities/challenges as factors that may affect the firm's internationalisation.

Practical implications

This paper develops a better understanding of the evolution of Chinese SOEs' internal capabilities as internationally competitive providers of hospitality management services. It also explores the nature of relevant relationships that will determine the activities, pace, and progress along such firms' internationalisation paths. The paper specifically provides understanding of a firm's prospects of internationalisation, internationalisation activities that the firm has already undertaken, factors that support or inhibit internationalisation, and future intentions and plans for internationalisation.

Originality/value

This paper analyses factors underlying a Chinese SOE domestic hotel firm's approach to internationalisation. While most internationalisation studies are conducted after the firm has already internationalised, this study examines the pre‐internationalisation stage.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Shuming Cai, Ngai Weng Chan, Hsiang‐te Kung and Pin‐Shuo Liu

This study examines the causes of flood disasters in Jianghan Plain, China and provides practical solutions to mitigate them. Results from this study indicate that both…

Abstract

This study examines the causes of flood disasters in Jianghan Plain, China and provides practical solutions to mitigate them. Results from this study indicate that both historical archives and more recent recorded data point to an increasing frequency in flood disasters since 1961. Furthermore, damage and losses from flood disasters have also increased significantly in the region. By analyzing the physical geographic factors and human activities, this study found that the main causative factors contributing to increasing flood disasters are landform/topography, climate elements, reduced drainage capacity of rivers in contrast to increased flood discharge, and human activities. Finally, the study examines various practical solutions to mitigate flood disasters in the Jianghan Plain.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Nan Liu, Lin Ruan, Ruoyu Jin, Yunfeng Chen, Xiaokang Deng and Tong Yang

The purpose of this paper is to target on individual perceptions of BIM practice in terms of BIM benefits, critical success factors (CSFs) and challenges in Chongqing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to target on individual perceptions of BIM practice in terms of BIM benefits, critical success factors (CSFs) and challenges in Chongqing which represented the less BIM-developed metropolitan cities in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a questionnaire-survey approach followed by statistical analysis, the study further divided the survey population from Chongqing into subgroups according to their employer types and organization sizes. A further subgroup analysis adopting statistical approach was conducted to investigate the effects of employer type and organization size on individual perceptions.

Findings

Subgroup analysis revealed that governmental employees held more conservative and neutral perceptions toward several items in BIM benefit, CSFs and challenges. It was inferred that smaller organizations with fewer than 100 full-time employees perceived more benefits of BIM in recruiting and retaining employees, and considered more critical of involving companies with BIM knowledge in their projects.

Originality/value

This study contributed to the body of knowledge in managerial BIM in terms that: it extended the research of individual perceptions toward BIM implementation by focusing on less BIM-mature regions; it contributed to previous studies of influencing factors to BIM practice-based perceptions by introducing factors related to organization type and sizes; and it would lead to future research in establishing BIM climate and culture which address perceptions and behaviors in BIM adoption at both individual and organizational levels.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Negin Dahya, W.E. King, Kung Jin Lee and Jin Ha Lee

Virtual reality (VR) is becoming a more available technology including in public spaces like libraries. The value and role of VR as a tool for learning and social…

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual reality (VR) is becoming a more available technology including in public spaces like libraries. The value and role of VR as a tool for learning and social engagement are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which library patrons and librarians perceive VR and experience VR through library drop-in programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on research conducted in seven Washington State Libraries where VR was adopted for drop-in programming for the first time. Data was collected between March and June 2018 and involved interviews with librarians and patrons, a patron user experience survey, and observational field notes from researchers on site during library programs.

Findings

Findings are presented in relation to user perceptions of VR compared to their actual VR experiences, and in relation to informal learning and social engagements. The authors frame the analysis and discussion in relation to sociotechnical imaginaries – culturally situated ideas about the relationship between society and technology, and considering the larger cultural landscape that informs collective views about the present and future.

Social implications

The paper discusses pending and potential inequalities related to gender, race and class in conversation with technology industry and VR. Issues discussed include unequal access to technology in public libraries and representation of minoritized groups in VR.

Originality/value

This work takes a critical perspective considering the inequities in relation to mainstreaming VR through public spaces like libraries.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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