Search results

1 – 10 of 79
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to investigate new undergraduate student library engagement in the Minrva mobile app during the months of May 2015 through December 2015.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate new undergraduate student library engagement in the Minrva mobile app during the months of May 2015 through December 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

This research investigated what parts of a mobile app new students were using in their first semester after downloading the app. The quantitative study used application programming interface log analysis to better understand what parts of the app new students use in the mobile app.

Findings

By undertaking this study, the author has a better understanding about what students are finding useful within the app and what tools are not being used by this cohort in their first semester.

Originality/value

The value of this research is in helping system designers and first-year experience planners know what mobile support tools students are finding useful in their first semester. Implication for mobile interface design based on module popularity are discussed.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to undertake a formative evaluation of growth over time that would demonstrate diverse library users’ development as they interact with mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to undertake a formative evaluation of growth over time that would demonstrate diverse library users’ development as they interact with mobile digital library services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper incorporated a server log analysis to evaluate first, the location of users. To study the nature of diverse user development, users from unique locations were identified and tracked over several years. The type of growth that this paper analyzes is the development of a library user from the beginning stages of use into one who is more experienced. For the purposes of this paper, the authors define library experts as experienced library users. These are users who have come back to the library over multiple sessions of learning and branched out into multiple areas of library functionality and services.

Findings

The findings of modular mobile use over time suggest that, while over half of users only utilized one module, 39 per cent of all users accessed more than one module. This formative approach to assessing student library engagement suggests alternative metrics for assessing outreach and distance learning.

Originality/value

The underlying departure point for this study is that formative models may introduce descriptive data valuable to the learning analytics toolkit. The library research literature on learning analytics, and perhaps library service offerings that support learning, may gain additional value by attending to students’ formative development as they interact with library resources. Describing the way in which mobile app users develop can yield insights about learning over time, both on campus and at a distance.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Jim Hahn and Courtney McDonald

This paper aims to introduce a machine learning-based “My Account” recommender for implementation in open discovery environments such as VuFind among others.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce a machine learning-based “My Account” recommender for implementation in open discovery environments such as VuFind among others.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to implementing machine learning-based personalized recommenders is undertaken as applied research leveraging data streams of transactional checkout data from discovery systems.

Findings

The authors discuss the need for large data sets from which to build an algorithm and introduce a prototype recommender service, describing the prototype’s data flow pipeline and machine learning processes.

Practical implications

The browse paradigm of discovery has neglected to leverage discovery system data to inform the development of personalized recommendations; with this paper, the authors show novel approaches to providing enhanced browse functionality by way of a user account.

Originality/value

In the age of big data and machine learning, advances in deep learning technology and data stream processing make it possible to leverage discovery system data to inform the development of personalized recommendations.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Jim F. Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a case study on virtual reality (VR) learning environments, focused on the development and integration of multi-user…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a case study on virtual reality (VR) learning environments, focused on the development and integration of multi-user reference support.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a case study methodology to understand applied software development incorporating textual browsing experiences within the HTC Vive virtual reality headset. An open corpus of text from the HathiTrust Digital Library accessed via the API was used as a data source.

Findings

In collaboration with students from a senior undergraduate Computer Science project course, the project team developed software to pilot a multi-user VR experience, with functionality for users to search, discover and select e-books and other digitized content from the HathiTrust digital library.

Originality/value

Overall, the system has been developed as a prototype e-book experiment to model several VR affordances for browsing, user support and educational endeavors within libraries. Within the VR reading room pilot, users are able collaboratively explore digital collections. Aspects of reference librarian user support were modeled in the VR system including communication in real-time using chat features and text highlighting and manipulation tools that are unique to learning in VR environments.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Michelle Leigh Jacobs

The purpose of this paper is to look at the big picture of where academic libraries fit into the mobile revolution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the big picture of where academic libraries fit into the mobile revolution.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Jim Hahn's accompanying article, “On the remediation of Wikipedia and the iPod,” the author comments on what remediation means for the academic library culture as a whole. The reflections are based on observations of current trends in technology and the emergence of a mobile culture. A definition of this generation of library users is suggested – the ING (information now generation). Editorial in nature, the paper also discusses some new technologies and how they might be applicable to the technological growth of libraries.

Findings

This reflection of current trends encourages librarians to look/listen, explore, apply, prevail when it comes to applying emerging technologies to the library world.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into how librarians can prepare themselves for the “Remediation Revolution.”

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Jim Hahn

This paper seeks to suggest a model for location‐based recommendation services that enable greater access to print and electronic resources.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to suggest a model for location‐based recommendation services that enable greater access to print and electronic resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a synthesis of previous work in basic and applied collections‐based wayfinding incorporating library and information science (LIS) literature on user context and system recommendations.

Findings

The paper identifies problems that will need to be solved before implementation of the production‐level recommendation service and suggests possible implications the system may have on reference and instruction services.

Originality/value

The paper provides computing workflows necessary to implement a library recommendation service based on user location. iPhone Software Developer Kit templates are leveraged for modeling data and interface prototypes. Use cases and user models are developed.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 September 2012

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to introduce mobile augmented reality applications for library uses and next generation library services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce mobile augmented reality applications for library uses and next generation library services.

Design/methodology/approach

Examples are drawn from museum and archives informatics, computer science applied research, and computer vision research as well as original research and development work from the Undergraduate Library at the University of Illinois.

Findings

Mobile augmented reality uses include augmenting physical book stacks browsing, library navigation, optical character recognition, facial recognition, and building identification mobile software for compelling library experiences.

Originality/value

The paper suggests uses of mobile augmented reality applications in library settings and models a demonstration prototype interface.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to report results of a formative usability study that investigated first-year student use of an optical character recognition (OCR) mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report results of a formative usability study that investigated first-year student use of an optical character recognition (OCR) mobile application (app) designed to help students find resources for course assignments. The app uses textual content from the assignment sheet to suggest relevant library resources of which students may not be aware.

Design/methodology/approach

Formative evaluation data are collected to inform the production level version of the mobile application and to understand student use models and requirements for OCR software in mobile applications.

Findings

Mobile OCR apps are helpful for undergraduate students searching known titles of books, general subject areas or searching for help guide content developed by the library. The results section details how student feedback shaped the next iteration of the app for integration as a Minrva module.

Research limitations/implications

This usability paper is not a large-scale quantitative study, but seeks to provide deep qualitative research data for the specific mobile interface studied, the Text-shot prototype.

Practical implications

The OCR application is designed to help students learn about availability of library resources based on scanning (e.g. taking a picture, or “Text-shot”) of an assignment sheet, a course syllabus or other course-related handouts.

Originality/value

This study contributes a new area of application development for libraries, with research methods that are useful for other mobile development studies.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a usability study which inquired into undergraduate student information seeking with Wikipedia on the iPod touch.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a usability study which inquired into undergraduate student information seeking with Wikipedia on the iPod touch.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are drawn from iPod search logs and student survey responses. Search log data are coded with FRBR subject entities (group 3 entity sets) for analysis.

Findings

Students characterize the overall nature of information searched for with the Wikipedia app to be for recreational and for short factual information. Recreational searching as a way in which undergraduate students utilize mobile technology is an earlier finding of Wikipedia iPod usage, and is verified as a trend of undergraduate student search using the iPod. All undergraduate student participants of the Wikipedia app on a mobile interface report this tool as helping to become more efficient in their research. Students viewed Wikipedia articles about people and concepts more so than other article types.

Originality/value

Undergraduate student mobile search log analysis over a specific type of information resource on the iPod Touch is an original usability project. Previous mobile search log analysis analyzes thousands of unknown users and millions of anonymous queries, where the devices used for searching are not always identifiable and trends about touch screens cannot be ascertained.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a usability study of information search on mobile devices, seeking to understand mobile computing best practice in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a usability study of information search on mobile devices, seeking to understand mobile computing best practice in the design of library services.

Design/methodology/approach

Three second‐year undergraduate students took part in this semester long study. They are loaned iPods with a Wikipedia copy to use as desired. Usability data are drawn from search logs recording titles of the articles searched and an internet‐based survey completed by students.

Findings

Students characterize the nature of information searched for on the Wikipedia iPods as recreational. Students did not utilize the iPods for academic research. Search logs show students viewed articles primarily about objects.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper do not show generalized principles of mobile search. More data collected from additional sets of users are needed in order to articulate principles of mobile search.

Practical implications

If it is the case that students will primarily make use of mobile computing for recreational or leisurely purposes then library services on mobile computing platforms must be designed accordingly.

Originality/value

The paper presents methods for the study of information search though mobile computing and poses questions resulting from this paper that require further study.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

1 – 10 of 79