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Article

Deborah Lee

Surveys have demonstrated that men and women are the victims and perpetrators of workplace bullying. Consequently, most researchers have failed to explore the gender…

Abstract

Surveys have demonstrated that men and women are the victims and perpetrators of workplace bullying. Consequently, most researchers have failed to explore the gender dynamics of this phenomenon. Draws upon qualitative interviews, which highlight the ways in which workplace bullying has developed in the context of new organisational arrangements and management techniques in the UK Civil Service, to show how the workplace bullying of women and men is informed by judgements of “appropriate” gender conduct and pressure to conform with such norms. As such, seeks to claim workplace bullying as a subject worthy of sustained feminist research.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Case study

Lynda L. Moore and Bonita L. Betters-Reed

This case is about Kija Kim, a Korean born founder and CEO of Harvard Design and Mapping Inc. (HDM). Founded in 1988, HDM is a cutting-edge GIS firm with $5 million in…

Abstract

This case is about Kija Kim, a Korean born founder and CEO of Harvard Design and Mapping Inc. (HDM). Founded in 1988, HDM is a cutting-edge GIS firm with $5 million in revenue and 35 employees in their Cambridge, MA and Washington D.C. offices. Through Kija Kim's leadership, HDM has become a significant niche player in homeland security and disaster relief. The case ends in fall 2005 just after HDM provided Hurricane Katrina mapping support, and Kija is nominated for the SBA Small Business Person of the Year. This case explores the intersection between cultural heritage, leadership effectiveness and organizational behavior. It particularly notes Kija's ability to turn her immigrant female minority status into a business advantage. This strength coupled with her ethos of care and ability to network in all walks of her life contributes to her distinctive and integrated leadership style. Definitions of leadership success and implications for decision making are also highlighted.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article

Daniel Parker and Gina Grandy

This paper aims to explore how varsity football athletes and coaches negotiate meanings when faced with the unmet expectations of a new head coach brought into lead a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how varsity football athletes and coaches negotiate meanings when faced with the unmet expectations of a new head coach brought into lead a turnaround process. It also aims to pay particular attention to the role of history in this meaning making process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on semi‐structured interviews with players and coaches at two points in time. To preserve the richness of their experiences and illuminate the historical aspects of change, it focuses on the stories of three players and one supporting coach.

Findings

Numerous symbols of change emerge that have multiple and contradictory meanings. The meanings around success and failure are renegotiated over time as individuals struggle with the unmet expectations of change. Moreover, individuals are unable to shed the failures of the past and move forward.

Practical implications

Change is a complex and messy process of managing multiple meanings. Understanding change entails more than a snapshot picture of an organization. New leaders have no control over the past, yet they need to be aware of how individuals experienced the past in order to increase the likelihood of success in the present.

Originality/value

Success and failure are experienced as an ongoing process as athletes and coaches experience, reflect on and interact with others. In illuminating the role of history in how change is experienced in the present, the paper demonstrates that the past can serve as both an immobilizing force, as well as a comparative point enabling individuals to rationalize their emotions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Case study

Tuvana Rua, Leanna Lawter, Jeanine Andreassi and Christopher York

“Jessica’s dilemma: honesty or loyalty” is the true story of a Staff Accountant, Jessica, who discovered embezzlement by the controller, Michael. Jessica worked at a US…

Abstract

Synopsis

“Jessica’s dilemma: honesty or loyalty” is the true story of a Staff Accountant, Jessica, who discovered embezzlement by the controller, Michael. Jessica worked at a US subsidiary of a multinational organization. One of the company’s vendors contacted Jessica regarding unpaid invoices. Following up on the inquiry, Jessica found suspicious manual journal entries in the general ledger. When she questioned her boss, Michael, about her findings, he first denied the situation, then blamed another employee, and ultimately tried to intimidate Jessica so that she would not press the issue. Jessica’s investigation led to the discovery that Michael had been embezzling money from the company. To complicate matters, Jessica and her husband had a close relationship with Michael and his wife outside the office. Jessica had to make a choice between being loyal to a family friend and being honest and loyal toward her employer.

Research methodology

The authors obtained the information for this case from the staff accountant and her husband via a series of interviews. The information was verified via publicly available news articles on the presented case. Additionally, legal documents, which were publicly available, were also used for information. The name of the company and the names of the individuals in the case were changed to protect the identities and privacy of the involved parties.

Relevant courses and levels

An instructor can use this case in business ethics, introductory management, human resource law or accounting courses targeting undergraduate or introductory MBA students. This case is best used in the beginning of the suggested courses, as the instructor introduces ethical dilemmas, ethical frameworks, and stakeholder theory. The case is designed so that students do not need a background in business or business ethics to be able to successfully complete the case analysis. Additionally, the case provides a platform to discuss the differences in an ethical vs an unethical manager and how to respond to such a situation.

Theoretical bases

Many employees are afraid to report ethical wrongdoing to upper management, or to engage in ethical dissent. When upper management is receptive to reports of wrongdoing, ethical dissent within the organization to upper-level management has more organizational benefits than when the issue is shared with coworkers or external agencies. This is because upper management has the power to make a difference in the situation and may be able to keep the situation within the organization to eliminate possible reputation problems for the organization. The presented case can be utilized to discuss the importance of feeling safe in an organization as it pertains to reporting wrongdoing within the organization and how organizational culture and leadership can enhance or diminish that feeling.

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Abstract

Details

inTOXICating FOLLOWERSHIP
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-458-8

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Article

Eric Liguori, Jeff Muldoon and Josh Bendickson

Experiential education is key if the authors as scholar-educators are to empower the next generation of students to recognize opportunities, exploit them and succeed in…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential education is key if the authors as scholar-educators are to empower the next generation of students to recognize opportunities, exploit them and succeed in entrepreneurship. Experiences facilitate the bridge between theory and practice; experiencing something serves as the linking process between action and thought. Capitalizing on technological advances of the last two decades, this paper depicts how film can be (and why it should be) incorporated into entrepreneurship classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the learning literature, broadly defined, to assess and articulate the experiential nature of film. More specifically, this paper establishes a framework for film as an experiential pedagogical approach, offering theoretical connections and best practice recommendations. In doing so, this paper assesses two feature films and provide educators with a guide for their use in the classroom.

Findings

This paper establishes a framework for film as an experiential pedagogical approach, offering theoretical connections and best practice recommendations. It concludes with two actionable case examples, broad enough they are deployable in almost any entrepreneurship classroom, assuming English is the primary language.

Originality/value

This paper brings to life a concept some have long assumed is effective, but the literature often neglects: the use of film as an experiential medium. In doing so, two new case examples are developed and available for immediate deployment into classrooms.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

F.W. Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to provide a transcript of Fredrick W. Taylor's 1907 lecture on his “task” system of management.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a transcript of Fredrick W. Taylor's 1907 lecture on his “task” system of management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows its advantages over traditional personal initiative styles, suggesting that managers should not allow employees to think for themselves but make sure they simply carry out tasks as instructed. Demonstrated this by using as an example pig‐iron handlers at Bethlehem Steel Company. Relates how he established scientific principles to ascertain the maximum load a man could carry and the optimum wage.

Findings

Instead of asking if workers felt able to move heavier loads, by telling them he only employed “high‐priced men”, he found plenty of willing employees.

Originality/value

The paper offers an example of how primary sources can be of critical importance to management scholars, not just management historians.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article

Provides transcript of Frederick W. Taylor′s 1907 lecture on his“task” system of management. Sets out to show its advantagesover traditional personal initiative styles…

Abstract

Provides transcript of Frederick W. Taylor′s 1907 lecture on his “task” system of management. Sets out to show its advantages over traditional personal initiative styles, suggesting that managers should not allow employees to think for themselves but make sure they simply carry out tasks as instructed. Demonstrates this by using as an example pig‐iron handlers at Bethlehem Steel Company. Relates how he established scientific principles to ascertain the maximum load a man could carry and the optimum wage. Instead of asking if workers felt able to move heavier loads, by telling them he only employed “high‐priced men”, he found plenty of willing employees.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article

Bob Garvey

This is the second piece in a series of three. Analyses two specificmentoring partnerships. The mentor relationships are part of an MBAlinked mentor scheme that is running…

Abstract

This is the second piece in a series of three. Analyses two specific mentoring partnerships. The mentor relationships are part of an MBA linked mentor scheme that is running within the Northern Region of the NHS. Explores the dimensions of the mentoring relationship and attempts to suggest a “best fit” set of dimensions for mentoring to be effective. Touches on the gender issue and Learning Style match. Goes on to debate the effectiveness of mentor development within the scheme and suggests ways in which this might be improved.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part

Dylan Rodríguez

A devastating racial logic remains at play in the moment of a “post-civil rights” Black presidency. Barack Obama's ascent has amplified a national mythology of racial…

Abstract

A devastating racial logic remains at play in the moment of a “post-civil rights” Black presidency. Barack Obama's ascent has amplified a national mythology of racial progress in the US multiculturalist age. This mythology has fundamentally undermined both the credibility and critical traction of existing scholarly-activist languages of racism, antiracism, white supremacy, and institutionalized racial dominance. Thus, the discourse of national-racial vindication that animates Obama's ascendance can and must be radically opposed with creative historical narrations. These narrations must attempt to explain how and why systems of racial dominance and state-condoned, state-sanctioned racist violence remain central to the shaping of our present tense. The chapter approaches this problematic by examining how the historical social logics of racial chattel slavery cannot be historically compartmentalized and temporally isolated into a discrete “past,” because they are genocidal in their structuring and are thus central to the constitution of our existing social and cultural systems. The apparatus of the North American racial chattel institution must be theorized in its present tense articulations because its logics of power, domination, and violence have never really left us. The essay offers a schematic elaboration of this reconceptualization of racial genocide focusing on how the slavery's abolition in the latter-19th century provides the political, cultural, and legal basis for slavery's “reform” into the apparatuses of policing, criminalization, widespread and state-sanctioned antiblack bodily violence, and ultimately massive imprisonment. This examination allows for an elaboration of how slavery's genocidal social logics permeate the present tense social formation, particularly at the site of massive racial criminalization and imprisonment.

Details

Rethinking Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-911-1

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